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20-1105 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

20-1105 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

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Thursday, 5 November 2020

  1. Commerce/BIS: “Order Denying Export Privileges — Abdul Majid Saidi”
  2. Commerce/BIS: “Orders Denying Export Privileges — Oswaldo Sanchez”
  3. Commerce/BIS: “Order Denying Export Privileges — Patrick Germain”
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. State/DDTC: Minutes from DTAG Meeting of 22 October 2020 Posted  
  4. Australia DEC Updates its Website
  5. EU Commission Publishes Proposal Granting a Union General Export Authorisation for Certain Dual-Use Items for UK and Northern Ireland
  6. EU Council: “Declaration by the High Representative on the Alignment of Certain Third Countries About Restrictive Measures Concerning Libya”
  1. Armenian Weekly: “ANCA Taking Action Against Manufacturers of US Parts Found in Turkish Drones Used by Azerbaijan to Kill Civilians in Artsakh and Armenia”
  2. ECD: “Three Companies Disclose Potential Export, Sanctions Violations”
  3. EUS: ” Huawei Files FOIA Complaint Against US Government Agencies”
  1. Husch Blackwell: “BIS Amends License Review Policy for National Security Controlled Items Destined for China, Venezuela, and Russia”
  2. Kelley Drye: “EU Targets November 10 for Imposition of Nearly $4 Billion in Tariffs on U.S. Goods in Aircraft Case”
  3. MME: “China – Additional Export Control Regime and its Impacts”
  1. ECTI Presents 15 Dec; The Export Control Year in Review Webinar
  2. FCC Academy Presents: 1 and 3 Dec; “U.S. Export Controls: ITAR/EAR” and “FMS”
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  4. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  5. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

(Source: Federal Register, 5 Nov 2020) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 70581: Notice
  On March 13, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan, Abdul Majid Saidi (“Saidi”), was convicted of violating 18 U.S.C. 371. Specifically, Saidi was convicted of knowingly and willfully conspiring to export from the United States to Lebanon guns and gun parts designated as defense articles on the United States Munitions List, without first obtaining the required licenses from the U.S. Department of State. Saidi was sentenced to three (3) months in prison, with credit for time served, two (2) years of supervised release, a $5,000 fine, and a $100 special assessment. . . .
  Accordingly, it is hereby ordered:
First, from the date of this Order until March 13, 2026, Abdul Majid Saidi, with a last known address of 2948 Pease Drive, Apt. 201, Rocky River, OH 44116, and when acting for or on his behalf, his successors, assigns, employees, agents or representatives (“the Denied Person”), may not directly or indirectly participate in any way in any transaction involving any commodity, software or technology (hereinafter collectively referred to as “item”) exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, including, but not limited to:
A. Applying for, obtaining, or using any license, license exception, or export control document
B. Carrying on negotiations concerning, or ordering, buying, receiving, using, selling, delivering, storing, disposing of, forwarding, transporting, financing, or otherwise servicing in any way, any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or engaging in any other activity subject to the Regulations; or
C. Benefitting in any way from any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or from any other activity subject to the Regulations.  . . .

Sixth, this Order is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until March 13, 2026.
 
Karen H. Nies-Vogel,
Director, Office of Exporter Services.

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(Source: Federal Register, 5 Nov 2020) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 70582: Notice
  On February 14, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, Oswaldo Sanchez (“Sanchez”), was convicted of violating 18 U.S.C. 554(a). Specifically, Sanchez was convicted of knowingly facilitating the transportation and concealment and aiding and abetting the facilitation and attempted facilitation of a .50 caliber rifle from the United States to Mexico, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 554. Sanchez was sentenced to probation of four years and a $100 special assessment.
 
Accordingly, it is hereby ordered:
  First, from the date of this Order until February 14, 2029, Oswaldo Sanchez, with a last known address of 17216 Running Doe Street, Laredo, TX 78045-5509, and when acting for or on his behalf, his successors, assigns, employees, agents or representatives (“the Denied Person”), may not directly or indirectly participate in any way in any transaction involving any commodity, software or technology (hereinafter collectively referred to as “item”) exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, including, but not limited to:
A. Applying for, obtaining, or using any license, license exception, or export control document;
B. Carrying on negotiations concerning, or ordering, buying, receiving, using, selling, delivering, storing, disposing of, forwarding, transporting, financing, or otherwise servicing in any way, any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or engaging in any other activity subject to the Regulations; or
C. Benefitting in any way from any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or from any other activity subject to the Regulations.  . . .

Sixth, this order is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until February 14, 2029.
 
Karen H. Nies-Vogel,
Director, Office of Exporter Services.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register, 5 Nov 2020) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 79583: Notice
  On May 16, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Patrick Germain (“Germain”) was convicted of violating 18 U.S.C. 554(a). Specifically, Germain was convicted of knowingly and fraudulently attempting to export firearms and ammunition from the United States to Haiti, contrary to the laws and regulations of the United States. Germain was sentenced to time served, two years supervised release and a $100 special assessment. …
Accordingly, it is hereby ordered:
 
First, from the date of this Order until May 16, 2029, Patrick Germain, with a last known address of 1837 Leland Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201, and when acting for or on his behalf, his successors, assigns, employees, agents or representatives (“the Denied Person”), may not directly or indirectly participate in any way in any Start Printed Page 70584transaction involving any commodity, software or technology (hereinafter collectively referred to as “item”) exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, including, but not limited to:
A. Applying for, obtaining, or using any license, license exception, or export control document;
B. Carrying on negotiations concerning, or ordering, buying, receiving, using, selling, delivering, storing, disposing of, forwarding, transporting, financing, or otherwise servicing in any way, any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or engaging in any other activity subject to the Regulations; or
C. Benefitting in any way from any transaction involving any item exported or to be exported from the United States that is subject to the Regulations, or from any other activity subject to the Regulations.  . . .

Sixth, this Order is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until May 16, 2029.
 
Karen H. Nies-Vogel,
Director, Office of Exporter Services.

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OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

(Source: Federal Register)
 
* Commerce/BIS: PROPOSED RULES; Commerce Control List: Proposed Controls on “Software” for the Operation of Certain Automated Nucleic Acid Assemblers and Synthesizers [6 Nov 2020] (PDF)

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OGS_a25. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)

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(Source: DDTC)

The Directory of Defense Trade Controls has posted the minutes of the 22 Oct 2020 meeting of the Defense Trade Advisory Group HERE.

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   The Department of Defence of the Australian Government has updated its website, offering a variety of documents and educative materials on Export Controls, Legislation, Regimes and relevant Agreements. Find more information here.

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  Commission Proposal for a REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL amending Council Regulation (EC) No 428/2009 by granting a Union General Export Authorisation for the export of certain dual-use items from the Union to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland was adopted on 4 November 2020.
Find the relevant publication here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
   On 21 September 2020, the Council adopted Council Decision (CFSP) 2020/1310[F/N1].
   The Council decided that two persons responsible for human rights abuses and three entities involved in violating the UN arms embargo should be added to the list of persons and entities subject to restrictive measures as set out in Annexes II and IV to Decision (CFSP) 2015/1333.
   The Candidate Countries the Republic of North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Albania[FN/2], and the EFTA countries Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, members of the European Economic Area, as well as Ukraine and Armenia align themselves with this Council Decision.
   They will ensure that their national policies conform to the Council Decision.
The European Union takes note of this commitment and welcomes it.

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COM NEWS

(Source: The Armenian Weekly, 4 Nov 2020) [Excerpts]

 
  Battlefield evidence confirms that Turkey’s Bayraktar drones-deployed by Azerbaijan against civilians in Artsakh and Armenia-contain parts and technology from US firms, US-based affiliates of foreign firms and firms located in NATO ally countries (UK, France, Germany, Austrian and Netherlands), reported the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA).
  The ANCA has organized a two-pronged campaign, targeting both Congress and the US companies selling drone parts that have been used by Turkey and Azerbaijan to kill Armenians-asking Congress to enforce Arms Export Control laws and the companies themselves to cease any and all sales or transfers that place Armenians at risk.
  Documentation can be found at anca.org/proof, a link recently retweeted by New York Times columnist Nick Kristof to his two-million followers.
  Through a grassroots letter-writing campaign and direct outreach, the ANCA is providing information documenting violations of US and international law-including US Arms Export Control laws-to the State Department, Pentagon, Justice Department and Congress.
   Separately, the ANCA is leading a daily call-tweet-write campaign to US manufacturers encouraging them to stop sales and transfers, starting with Garmin.
  A part-by-part analysis obtained by the ANCA reveals that the following Bayraktar drone parts and technology are sourced in the US:
-Airborne Modem Transceiver, produced by ViaSat in Carlsbad, CA
-Antenna, produced by Comant Industries in Fullerton, CA
-GPS Receiver, Trimble Navigation, Sunnyvale, CA
-Fuel Filter, produced by the US affiliate of German firm Hengst, in Camden, SC
-Stub Bus Coupler, produced by MilesTek, in Lewisville, TX
-GPS Navigation Unit, produced the U.S. affiliate of Swiss firm Garmin, Olathe, KS
-Optical Unit, produced by U.S. affiliate of Canadian firm produced by Wescam, Orlando, FL
-Radar Altimetre, produced by U.S. affiliate of German firm Smart Microwave Sensors, Irvine, CA
-Sealed Fuel Reservoir, produced by U.S. affiliate of French firm Beringer, Greenville, SC

(Source: Export Compliance Daily, 5 Nov 2020) [Excerpts]

 
  Three U.S. companies said they may have violated U.S. sanctions or export controls related to overseas sales and illegally processed payments, according to their most recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The potential violations include disclosures of dealings with sanctioned businesses, including sales to Iran. … [Paywalled article.]

 
  Huawei has filed a complaint in a Washington DC federal court under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) against various US government agencies, including the Justice, Commerce, Treasury and State Departments, to compel the expedited release of documents requested over 1 year ago. The FOIA requests relate to the US’ investigation into Huawei, the prosecution of its Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, trade relations between the US and China, and competition over 5G technology.
  Huawei alleges that the agencies have not responded to 9 of 12 requests, and that the agencies’ responses to the remaining 3 were inadequate. Huawei argues that the majority of the agencies have failed to comply with regulations providing for the expedited processing of requests that involve “matters of widespread and exceptional media interest”, and “raise possible questions about the government’s integrity which affect public confidence”. Due to the nature of the case, Huawei says that its requests satisfy this standard.

COM COMMENTARY

 
* Principal Author: Beau Jackson, Esq., 1-202-378-2406, Husch Blackwell 
 
  The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) issued a final rule effective October 29, 2020 amending Section 742.4(b)(7) of the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) to revise the license review policy for items controlled for National Security reasons (“NS items”) destined for the People’s Republic of China (“China”), Venezuela, or the Russian Federation (“Russia”).
  According to the final rule, BIS will review all NS item applications involving China, Russia or Venezuela to determine the risk of diversion to a “military end user” or for a “military end use.” Exports, reexports and transfers of NS items destined for civil end users and civil end uses in China, Venezuela or Russia are subject to a presumption of approval, while BIS will apply a presumption of denial when reviewing applications for exports, reexports or transfers of NS items that will make a “material contribution” to the “development, production, maintenance, repair, or operation” of weapon systems, subsystems and assemblies in those three countries.
  This amendment follows a similar update to Section 744.21 of the EAR which, as of June 29, 2020, significantly expanded the EAR’s definition of “military end use” and also prohibited exports, reexports and in-country transfers of specified items to China, Russia or Venezuela when those items will be used by “military end users” or for a “military end use.” BIS’s amendments to Section 744.21 only applied to specific items listed on Supplement No. 2 to EAR Part 744, but BIS did change its licensing review standard to a presumption of denial for those specific items.
  BIS set forth several factors that it will now consider when reviewing license applications involving NS items destined to China, Russia or Venezuela. These factors include:
  • The appropriateness of the export, reexport or transfer for the stated end use;
  • The significance of the item to the importing country’s weapons systems capabilities;
  • Whether any party is a “military end user” as defined in § 744.21(g) of the EAR, or is involved in military activities including the “development, production, maintenance, repair, or operation of weapons systems, subsystems, and assemblies”;
  • The reliability of the parties to the transaction;
  • Government strategies/policies that support diversion of civil end use exports towards a military end user; and
  • The scope and effectiveness of the importing country’s system of export controls.
  It is important to note that exports, reexports and transfers destined for civil end users and civil end uses in China, Venezuela or Russia are subject to a presumption of approval license policy. The review will also assess and consider the impact of the export of a certain controlled item on the U.S. domestic industry, including the negative impact of a denial of application.

 
* Principal Author: Jennifer McCadney, Esq., 1-202-342-8416, Kelley Drye & Warren LLP 
 
  The WTO has given final approval for the EU to impose tariffs on at least $4 billion of U.S. goods in retaliation over illegal aid in connection with the Boeing/Airbus aircraft dispute.  The EU has set a target date of November 10, 2020 to impose tariffs, regardless of the outcome of the U.S. presidential election.  Press accounts indicate the EU Commission has given EU member states until November 3 to provide input on the targeted products.
  While the U.S. and the EU have indicated general support for a settlement of the 16-year aircraft dispute, the two sides continue to disagree on settlement terms.  The EU has urged the U.S. to remove tariffs over EU subsidies to Airbus because it has repealed those programs, while the U.S. contends that since it has already removed the subsidies to Boeing, there is no legitimate basis for EU retaliation.  It seems unlikely the parties will reach a settlement by the November 10, 2020 deadline.  The EU has stated that it will move forward with the tariffs if there is no settlement by November 10, 2020. 
  President Trump has warned that the U.S. will strike harder should the EU impose tariffs.  The U.S. to date has not applied the maximum tariff level in the $7.5 billion damages award against the EU from the WTO in 2019.  Instead, the U.S. has imposed 15% tariffs on Airbus aircraft and 25% levies on various other European exports such as French wine, Scotch whisky and Spanish olives.  The U.S. could raise these import taxes to 100%, which would effectively bar many of these European products from entering the U.S. market.
  It is widely anticipated that the updated list of U.S. goods subject to the new EU retaliatory tariffs will be based on the EU’s preliminary April 2019 list, which identified U.S. products under consideration for the application of additional tariffs.  Products of note on the April 2019 list include: fresh and frozen fish of a variety of species; fresh and dried fruits and vegetables, sugar, cocoa powder and chocolate, nuts and seeds, orange juice and grapefruit juice, wine and alcohol, polymers, suitcases and handbags, shovel loaders and tractors, and video game consuls.
  While any listed product may be subject to additional tariffs, the EU may not apply tariffs exceeding the approved level of countermeasures, totaling just under $4 billion.

(Source: MME, Nov 2020) [Excerpts]

 
* Principal Author: Raphael Brunner, 41-44-254-99-66, MME Legal | Tax | Compliance 
 

BACKGROUND

  The National Congress of China has passed a completely revised Export Control Law (“ECL”) on October 17, 2020, which will take effect on December 1, 2020. This new ECL will restrict not only the export of dual-use and military products, technology and services to support non-proliferation objectives, but will also allow China to restrict the export of technology for national security and public policy reasons. Prohibitions of export or licensing requirement will be based on the items, as well as their end users, end-uses or destinations.
Although China is a member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), they are not members of the various multinational trade control regimes, such as the Australia Group, the Missile Technology Control Regime, the Nuclear Suppliers Group, or the Wassenaar Arrangement, which establish measures to prevent the proliferation of dual use, nuclear and biological weapons, arms and other weapons of mass destruction.
  As such, China has previously sought to control sensitive imports and exports via a number of specific regulations which approximate international commitments. The new ECL will serve as China’s first comprehensive law on trade controls and will unify existing regulations. 

 
II. WHAT WILL BE CONTROLLED?

  The ECL seeks to impose export controls over “dual-use items, military items, nuclear items and other goods, technologies, services and items relating to the maintenance of national security and national interests, as well as the performance of anti-proliferation and other international obligations”, together referred to as “Controlled Items” listed on the export control list.
  The new law equally introduces the concept of “temporary controls” (article 9), which unlike Controlled Items, are temporary measures required for the “maintenance of national security and national interests and the performance of anti-proliferation and other international obligations”. Temporary controls are enforced for up to two years, after which controls may be extended, cancelled or permanently listed as a Controlled Item.
  Controlled Items and items under temporary control are subject to the ECL if they undergo the following activities:
  • Export: a transfer of controlled items from Chinese territory
  • Deemed export: a provision of controlled items, technology or know-how by Chinese citizens, legal persons or other entities to foreign individuals or organizations, whether physically located within China or abroad.
  • Re-Export: The definition of re-export is not fully clear yet. In previous versions of the draft legislation, the re-export of controlled Chinese goods, or foreign-made goods with controlled Chinese content were meant to be subject to licensing. This wording has not been transferred to the final law, but the current version leaves a certain degree of uncertainty whether the re-export of controlled Chinese goods from third countries may be subject to Chinese licensing.
  • Transit or transhipment from or through customs-controlled areas such as free zones, export processing zones or bonded warehouses.

III. NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERESTS 

  Besides the inclusion of list-based and temporary controls, the law also spells out a catch-all provision (article 12) that puts any goods under control that may i) endanger national security and interests, (ii) be used to design, develop, produce or use weapons of mass destruction or their transportation vehicles, or (iii) be used for terrorism purposes. The notion of how China will restrict the trade and transfer of goods in the interest of public and national security may open the door to the use of very broad catch-all provisions.
 

IV. EXTRATERRITORIALITY

  While the licensing of re-export controlled goods is not fully established yet, the law clearly defines extraterritoriality in Article 44, which provides that organizations or individuals outside China that violate the ECL or endanger the national security and national interest of China, or otherwise hinder the performance of non-proliferation and other international obligations, shall be subject to investigation and legal liability in accordance with the law.
 

V. RETALIATION MEASURES

  Article 48 allows reciprocal measures against foreign countries or regions that make use of national export control measures to endanger Chinese security or interests. 
 

VI. SWISS IMPACT: CHINA’S ECL

  Swiss entities with Chinese subsidiaries or foreign entities who engage in trading activities in China and, in doing so declare exports to Chinese customs (e.g. procurement from China under Incoterms EXW), should be aware of their export control licensing obligations. This may likely include a requirement to classify all items subject to export controls, ensure that controlled items are declared at export and license conditions are observed. License management, including applications for trade-facilitating general licenses, will fall under the joint responsibility of the Chinese departments of the State Council and the Central Military Commission, collectively referred to as the “State Export Control Administrative Departments” (SECADs).
  To date, there seems to be no clarity on license requirements for the re-export of controlled goods of Chinese origin or foreign assemblies containing controlled Chinese content above a given de minimis level. This however must be closely monitored. 
 

VII. SWISS IMPACT: HONG KONG AND NEW SANCTIONS

  Along with the observance of China’s new comprehensive export controls, Swiss entities should ensure that counterparty screening activities incorporate updated US and Chinese sanctions, as China may impose unilateral sanctions as a retaliatory measure against US and international sanctions targeting Chinese nationals that “undermined human rights and fundamental freedoms in Hong Kong” by helping to develop or implement the Hong Kong National Security Law.
  For commercial activities involving dual-use or military items, goods or technology subject to the US extra-territorial controls, Swiss and other global entities should be aware that US re-export authorisations for transfers from HK to China may be denied. U.S. license exceptions (LVS, GBS, TSR, APP, AVS, GOV…) formerly available for HK have been rescinded by the US Bureau of Industry and Security, owing in part to the perceived risk that US technology (including deemed exports) exported to Hong Kong are at higher risk for diversion to China under new Chinese increased authority.
 

VIII. CONCLUSION

  Companies are advised to carefully evaluate the commercial, legal and reputational risks of non-compliance with national / unilateral sanctions and export controls in key jurisdictions such as the US and China, as consequences may include supply chain disruptions, market access limitations and costly penalties.

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

 
* What: The Export Control Year in Review 
* When: 15 Dec; 1:00 p.m. (EST)
* Where: Webinar
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Training Institute (ECTI)
* ECTI Speaker: Scott Gearity
* Register: here or contact Ashleigh Foor, 1-540-433-3977, ashleigh@learnexportcompliance.com.
 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

U.S. Export Controls: ITAR & EAR from a non-U.S. Perspective (Tuesday, 1 Dec 2020)
Presenters: Jim Bartlett & Marco Crombach
Register or find more information here

 
The ABC of Foreign Military Sales (FMS) (Thursday, 3 Dec 2020)
Presenters: Mike Farrell & Jim Bartlett
Register or find more information here
* Register for both and take advantage of our discounted price!
 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a118. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)

 
* Ella Wheeler Wilcox (5 Nov 1850 – 20 Oct 1919; was an American author and poet. Her works include Poems of Passion and Solitude, which contains the lines “Laugh, and the world laughs with you; weep, and you weep alone.” Her autobiography, The Worlds and I, was published in 1918, a year before her death.)
  – “To sin by silence, when we should protest, Makes cowards out of men.”
  – “With every deed you are sowing a seed, though the harvest you may not see.”
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.

 

5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499:

Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation. 
DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. 

9 Oct 2020: 
85 FR 64014:  Revisions to the Unverified List (UVL)

DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.  
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)

: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense. 

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810.    23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359: comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.  

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 
DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War. 
14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 

28 Sep 2020: 85 FR 60874: Temporary Amendment for Republic of Cyprus. The latest edition of the BITAR is 28 Sep 2020. 

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders
Amendment of Cuban Assets Control Regulations.
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.

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