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20-1029 Thursday “Daily Bugle “

20-1029 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

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Thursday, 29 October 2020

  1. Commerce/BIS: “Amendments to EAR National Security License Review Policy re China, Russia, and Venezuela”
  2. Commerce/BIS: “Order Denying Export Privileges for Jimy Joseph”
  3. Commerce/BIS: “Order Denying Export Privileges for Junior Joel Joseph”
  4. Treasury/OFAC Amends Yemen Sanctions Regulations
  5. Treasury/OFAC: “Blocking or Unblocking of Persons and Properties”
  6. USTR: “Modifications to the Harmonized Tariff Schedule Concerning the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement; Effective Date”
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. State/DDTC: (No new postings)
  4. Treasury/OFAC: “Publication of Amended Yemen Sanctions Regulations”
  5. UK GOV Updates List of Export Licences and Certificates from 1 January 2021
  1. EUS: “US Rescinds Sudan Designation as a State Sponsor of Terrorism”
  2. FT: “Taiwan’s UMC Pleads Guilty to US Charges of Trade Secret Theft”
  3. Janes: “China Enacts New Defence Export Legislation”
  1. Gleiss Lutz: “The New Chinese Export Control Law”
  2. Thompson Hine: “OFAC Restricts Remittances to and from Cuba to Exclude Entities on Cuba Restricted List”
  1. ECS Presents: 16-17 Nov; “ITAR/EAR Controls for Non-U.S. Companies”
  2. FCC Academy Presents: 1 and 3 Dec; “U.S. Export Controls: ITAR/EAR” and “FMS”
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  4. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  5. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68448: Rule
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce.
* ACTION: Final rule.
* SUMMARY: In this final rule, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amends the 15 CFR 742.4 of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to revise the license review policy for items controlled for national security reasons destined to the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Venezuela, or the Russian Federation (Russia). With this revision, BIS and reviewing agencies will determine whether the export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) of items controlled for National Security (NS) reasons will make a material contribution to the development, production, maintenance, repair, or operation of weapons systems of the PRC, Venezuela, or the Russian Federation, as well as setting forth several factors that will be considered in reviewing license applications.
* DATES: This rule is effective October 29, 2020.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:Sharron Cook, Regulatory Policy Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, Email: Sharron.cook@bis.doc.gov or Phone: 202-492-2440.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68558: Notice
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce.
* ACTION: Notice.
* SUMMARY: On May 22, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida, Jimy Joseph was convicted of violating 18 U.S.C. 371 and 18 U.S.C. 554(a). Specifically, Jimy Joseph was convicted of conspiring to illegally export and send firearms and ammunition from the United States to Haiti without having obtained the required authorization, license, or approval, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371; and for fraudulently and knowingly exporting, sending, and attempting to export AR-15 Type Rifles, Glock semi-automatic pistols, and ammunition from the United States to Haiti, in violation 18 U.S.C. 554. Jimy Joseph was sentenced to 16 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and a $200 assessment.
 
Based upon my review of the record, including Jimy Joseph’s written submissions, and consultations with BIS’s Office of Export Enforcement, including its Director, and the facts available to BIS, I have decided to deny Jimy Joseph’s export privileges under the Regulations for a period of seven years from the date of Jimy Joseph’s conviction. I have also decided to revoke any BIS-issued licenses in which Jimy Joseph had an interest at the time of his conviction.  . . .

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68557: Notice
 
* AGENCY:Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce.
* ACTION: Notice.
* SUMMARY: On April 12, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida, Junior Joel Joseph (“Junior Joseph”) was convicted of violating 18 U.S.C. 371, Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act, 22 U.S.C.A. 2778 (2012) (“AECA”), the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C 1701et seq. (2012)) (“IEEPA”) and 18 U.S.C. 554(a). Specifically, Junior Joseph was convicted of conspiring to illegally export and send firearms and ammunition from the United States to Haiti without having obtained the required authorization, license, or approval, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371...
 
Based upon my review of the record and consultations with BIS’s Office of Export Enforcement, including its Director, and the facts available to BIS, I have decided to deny Junior Joseph’s export privileges under the Regulations for a period of seven years from the date of Junior Joseph’s conviction. I have also decided to revoke any BIS-issued licenses in which Junior Joseph had an interest at the time of his conviction.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68461: Final Rule
 
* AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury.
* ACTION: Final rule.
* SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is amending the Yemen Sanctions Regulations and reissuing them in their entirety to further implement Executive Order 13611 of May 16, 2012, “Blocking Property of Persons Threatening the Peace, Security, or Stability of Yemen.” This final rule replaces the regulations that were published in abbreviated form on November 9, 2012, with a more comprehensive set of regulations that includes additional interpretive and definitional guidance, general licenses, statements of licensing policy, and other regulatory provisions that will provide further guidance to the public. Due to the number of regulatory sections being updated or added, OFAC is reissuing the Yemen Sanctions Regulations in their entirety.
* DATES: This rule is effective October 29, 2020.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:OFAC: Assistant Director for Licensing, 202-622-2480; Assistant Director for Regulatory Affairs, 202-622-4855; or Assistant Director for Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, 202-622-2490.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68624: Notice.
 
* AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury.
* ACTION: Notice
* SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of one or more persons that have been placed on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List based on OFAC’s determination that one or more applicable legal criteria were satisfied. All property and interests in property subject to U.S. jurisdiction of this person is blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with this person.
* DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for effective date(s).
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:OFAC: Associate Director for Global Targeting, tel.: 202-622-2420; Assistant Director for Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, tel.: 202-622-2490; Assistant Director for Licensing, tel.: 202-622-2480; or Assistant Director for Regulatory Affairs, tel.: 202-622-4855.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 68619: Notice
 
* AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.
* ACTION: Notice.
* SUMMARY: The Office of United States Trade Representative is announcing the effective date of modifications to the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) concerning the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (USCTPA).
* DATES:This notice is applicable on January 1, 2021.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:Assistant General Counsel Erin Rogers (202) 395-9126or Erin_F_Rogers@ustr.eop.gov.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

(Source: Federal Register)
 
* Commerce/BIS; NOTICES; Meetings:Transportation and Related Equipment Technical Advisory Committee; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)
 
* State/DDTC; NOTICES; Notifications to the Congress of Proposed Commercial Export Licenses; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)
 
* DHS/CBP; NOTICES; Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals:Cargo Manifest/Declaration, Stow Plan, Container Status Messages and Importer Security Filing; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)
 
* DHS/CBP; NOTICES; Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Customs Regulations Pertaining to Customhouse Brokers; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)
 
* DHS/CBP; NOTICES; Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals:Drawback ProcessRegulations; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)
 
* DHS/CBP; NOTICES; Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Entry and Manifest of Merchandise Free of Duty, Carrier’s Certificate of Release; [Pub. Date: 30 Oct 2020] (PDF)

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a28. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
OFAC has amended and reissued in their entirety the Yemen Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 552.  This final rule replaces the regulations that were published in abbreviated form on November 9, 2012, with a more comprehensive set of regulations that includes additional interpretive and definitional guidance, general licenses, statements of licensing policy, and other regulatory provisions that will provide further guidance to the public.   

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: UK GOV, 28 Oct 2020)
 
The UK updates the list of licences, certificates and special rules for taking goods out of the UK from 1 January 2021.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

 
The Trump administration has formally notified Congress that Sudan’s designation as a state sponsor of terrorism will be rescinded pursuant to the National Defence Authorisation Act 2019 on the grounds that (i) Sudan has not provided any support for acts of international terrorism in last 6 months, and (ii) assurances have been given that it will not support international terrorism in the future. The decision was reached after Sudan “agreed to resolve claims of United States victims of terror and their families [and] in fulfilment of that agreement, the transitional government of Sudan transferred $335 million into an escrow account for these victims and their families”. OFAC lifted comprehensive sanctions against Sudan in October 2017 (post). See press statement.

(Source: Financial Times, 29 Oct 2020)
 
Taiwanese contract chipmaker United Microelectronics Corporation has pleaded guilty to a US criminal charge of stealing trade secrets and been fined $60m, the second-largest penalty for such cases. UMC escaped more serious charges in exchange for co-operating against Chinese memory chipmaker Fujian Jinhua, its co-defendant in the case, according to the US DOJ.

(Source: Janes, 28 Oct 2020)
 
China has formally enacted legislation to strengthen controls of military exports. The ‘Export Control Law’ was approved recently at the 22nd session of the Standing Committee of the 13th National People’s Congress.

The new law, which was released in draft versions in 2017 and 2019, replaces several sets of regulations that had governed China’s international military sales for several decades. The legislation, which will be effective from 1 December 2020, is also seen as a Chinese response to international criticism of its military export policy.
 
“These regulations are formulated for the purposes of strengthening [the] export control of missiles and missile-related items and technologies, and safeguarding the state security and social and public interests,” states Article 1 of the new legislation.  

The Export Control Law states that it seeks to regulate ‘controlled items’ that are defined as dual-use, military, nuclear and other national security-related goods, technologies, and services. It also imposes “prohibitive or restrictive measures” on the export of such products and mandates tighter government oversight of export processes including shipping, end-user applications, and customer re-exports.

Another aspect of the law is the requirement for Chinese military export control authorities to conduct risk assessments on countries and/or regions to which exports may “endanger national security” or present risks related to proliferation or acts of terrorism. The legislation also encourages exporters to enhance internal compliance mechanisms.

China’s military exports have traditionally been vetted by the State Administration of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense (SASTIND). In major sales the State Council is also likely to be involved.

COM COMMENTARY

(Source: Gleiss Lutz, 28 Oct 2020)
 
* Principal Author: Dr. Michael Burian, Esq., 49-711-8997-300, Gleiss Lutz
 
The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress has recently codified China’s export control law for the first time in a single piece of legislation with effect as of 1 December 2020 and significantly expanded its scope. With new, far-reaching powers of control and threats of fines, the reforms will have a significant impact on export business, regardless of whether companies have a subsidiary or branch in China.
Summary
  • Companies with and without subsidiaries or branches in China will be subject to comprehensive Chinese export control policies in the future. The new Export Control Law (“ECL”) is broad in scope and, in particular, extraterritorial in reach.
  • Chinese export control policies now extend to all goods that could endanger China’s national security and national interests.
  • Exporters and other parties involved in the export business face heavy fines for violating the provisions of the ECL.
  • Companies should take a critical look at the compliance measures for their Chinese business and adjust them if necessary.
 
China’s previous export control legislation
Until now, Chinese export control policies have been regulated in numerous laws, executive orders and explanatory regulations. Export operations were, among other things, subject to foreign trade law, customs law and criminal law. The export control regulations focused mainly on standard military goods. In recent years, however, trade in sensitive goods has been increasingly restricted and controlled. With the ECL, China is now codifying the existing regulatory regime for the export of military and dual-use items, thereby significantly extending its scope and the State’s powers of control. The aim of the ECL is to safeguard national interests and security, prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, regulate export business and enhance export control (Article 1 ECL). The ECL will enter into force on 1 December 2020.
The extraterritorial scope of the ECL and the restrictions on re-exports are reminiscent of US export control law. Even though the law has not yet been implemented as such, companies doing business with China should take steps now to review their compliance strategies in light of the new requirements.
 
Key points of the new ECL
 
1)   Export control under the ECL will continue to be managed centrally by the departments of the State Council and Central Military Commission, which were already responsible for export control (the competent authorities are collectively referred to as the State Export Control Administrative Departments, “SECADs”). In terms of the actual implementation, China has however kept the existing decentralised control system run by the provinces. At the same time, new mechanisms and agencies should ensure a better exchange of information and expertise and establish new opportunities for cooperation (Article 5 ECL).   
 
2)   The material scope of the ECL is broadly defined. Application of the new Export Control Law is not restricted to the control of military, dual-use and nuclear goods, but instead also covers all “other goods, technologies and services relating to the maintenance of national security and national interests, performance of anti-proliferation and other international obligations” (Article 2 ECL). Re-exports of controlled items are also covered by the material scope of the ECL.

However, given the broad definition of controlled items, the exact scope of the control is unclear. This will likely only become clearer through the implementing regulations, the control and item lists and the practical application of the ECL by the SECADs.  
   
3)   The same applies to the territorial scope of the ECL: Companies with registered office in and outside China will have to comply with the new regulations. As such, the ECL is extraterritorial in reach.
  • Article 2 ECL states that export control not only covers the export of controlled items out of China but also the transfer of controlled items by citizens, legal persons or non-corporate organisations based in China to foreign organisations and individuals. This means that even the transfer of sensitive technologies or data by subsidiaries based in China to subsidiaries and branches outside China may be regarded as an export within the meaning of the ECL.
  • Pursuant to Article 45, the ECL also applies to the “transit, transshipment, through shipment and re-export of controlled items as well as to the export of controlled items from bonded areas, export processing zones and other areas […]“.
4)   An export licence is required for the export of controlled items. It is not only the goods specified in the general lists of controlled items or goods that are subject to temporary control for which such a licence must be obtained. Exporters must also apply for a licence if they are or should be aware that an (unlisted) item for export poses a risk to China’s national interests or national security, is used for the development and production of weapons of mass destruction or serves terrorist purposes. This means that the mere negligent failure to recognise a security risk or a potential violation of Chinese interests already exposes a company to the risk of sanctions. A large number of criteria is used to assess whether an export licence will be granted. In addition to the sensitivity of the items, the destination country and the intended end use, the past reliability of the exporter also plays a role. The decision not to grant a licence may also be based on a violation of national interests or the endangering of national security.    
 
5)   Exporters are obliged to submit documentation to the SECADs regarding the intended end use of the controlled items as well as the end users. End users may not deviate from the intended end use, and any such deviation must be reported to the SECADs. The latter will place any end users that have violated the requirements or that may endanger the national interests or national security of China or use the controlled items for terrorist purposes on a “blacklist” of untrustworthy companies. Exporters are prohibited from entering into any transactions with companies on the list, with violations being subject to fines.   
 
6)   The new ECL lays down far-reaching official powers to investigate and intervene in order to implement the export control provisions. These include searching business premises and questioning the employees of all the companies involved in the export transaction, accessing bank accounts, seizing the goods intended for export, inspecting transport vehicles and examining and copying all business records relevant for the investigation. In addition, all other persons and companies connected to the transaction may also be interviewed and their business records scrutinised. German and European end customers may also be affected by this.    
 
7)   Violations of the ECL’s provisions are punishable by heavy fines. Should an obligation to apply for an export licence be violated, the authorities have the power – insofar as the export has resulted in income of RMB 500,000 (approx. EUR 63,000) or more – to confiscate this income and impose a fine of between five and ten times the turnover. If the violation results in income of less than RMB 500,000, a fine of between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million (approx. EUR 630,000) is to be imposed. In the case of serious violations, a company may be ordered to temporarily suspend business, may be given a negative entry in China’s social credit system or may even be generally barred from exporting goods. Natural persons directly responsible for violations may be generally prohibited from engaging in any activities relating to export operations. Criminal penalties may moreover apply as well if a violation of the provisions of the ECL also constitutes a criminal offence, e.g. smuggling, illegal business operations or the disclosure of state secrets.   
8)   Article 48 ECL is also potentially significant given the current geopolitical and economic tensions between China and the US: This provides that retaliatory measures may be taken by China if export control provisions are abused or its national security is endangered by other countries.
 
Implications and consequences
The new Chinese Export Control Law has a much broader scope than the previous legislation. The use of vague legal terms such as “national interests and national security”, in particular, gives the authorities a broad margin of discretion. Ultimately, time will tell to what extent the authorities will make use of their powers of control and intervention when applying the rules in practice. Guidelines in the form of detailed implementing regulations and explanations from the SECADs and the decentralised export control authorities have been announced and are generally to be welcomed. Nevertheless, the expanded export control powers increase the risk of sanctions. Companies face heavy fines or even being de facto barred from the export business for simply violating the rules through negligence. Because of the extraterritorial scope, the new regulations have an equal impact on companies with and without a subsidiary or branch in China. Companies that do business with China would therefore be well advised to carry out a careful risk assessment of their supply chains and commercial channels at this stage already, and to bring these in line with the new requirements if necessary.

(Source: Thompson Hine, 28 Oct 2020)
 
* Principal Author: Joyce Rodriguez, Esq., 1-202-973-2724, Thompson Hine
 
On October 27, 2020, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) published a final rule in the Federal Register amending the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) to remove from the scope of generally authorized remittances any transactions involving “entities or subentities” identified on the U.S. Department of State’s Cuba Restricted List. The amendment will restrict these entities’ access to funds obtained in connection with remittance-related activities, including in their role as intermediaries or in their receipt of fees or commissions from processing remittance transactions.  The amendment becomes effective on November 26, 2020.
Specifically, the final rule’s amendment will directly impact the scope of the following general licenses:
  • 31 CFR § 515.570, authorizing certain types of remittances to Cuba from persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction or from blocked accounts;
  • 31 CFR § 515.572(a)(3), authorizing certain travel related and remittance forwarding services; and
  • 31 CFR § 515.587, authoring certain remittances from Cuban nationals to persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction.
The rule will also amend 31 CFR § 515.421 (authorizing certain transactions ordinarily incident to licensed transactions) to make clear that a transaction relating to the “collection, forwarding, or receipt of remittances” involving any entity or subentity identified on the Cuba Restricted List “is not authorized as an ordinarily incident transaction where the terms of the general or specific license expressly exclude any such transactions.”
As a result of these amendments, effective November 26, 2020, persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction will no longer be authorized to process remittances to or from Cuba through FINCIMEX and AIS or any other entity or subentity on the Cuba Restricted List.

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

(Source: ECS)

*What: ITAR/EAR Controls for Non-U.S. Companies
*When: 16-17 Nov
*Where: Your Computer
*Sponsor: Export Compliance Solutions & Consulting (ECS)
*ECS Speakers: Suzanne Palmer, Marc Binder
*Register: Here or write to phyllis@exportcompliancesolutions.com or call 1-866-238-4018
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

U.S. Export Controls: ITAR & EAR from a non-U.S. Perspective (Tuesday, 1 Dec 2020)Presenters: Jim Bartlett and Marco Crombach
Register or find more information here

 
The ABC of Foreign Military Sales (FMS) (Thursday, 3 Dec 2020) Presenters: Mike Farrell and Jim Bartlett
Register or find more information here
* Register for both and take advantage of our discounted price!
 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a119. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)

 
* James Boswell (James Boswell, 9th Laird of Auchinleck; 29 Oct 1740 – 19 May 1795; was a Scottish biographer, diarist, and lawyer. He is best known for writing the biography Life of Samuel Johnson, about the life of his friend and older contemporary, the English writer Samuel Johnson, which is commonly said to be the greatest biography written in the English language.)
  – “I think no innocent species of wit or pleasantry should be suppressed: and that a good pun may be admitted among the smaller excellences of lively conversation.”
  – “I have discovered that we may be in some degree whatever character we choose. Besides, practice forms a man to anything.”
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.

 

5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499:

Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation. 
DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. 

9 Oct 2020: 
85 FR 64014:  Revisions to the Unverified List (UVL)

DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.  
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)

: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense. 

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810.    23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359: comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.  

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 
DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War. 
14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 

28 Sep 2020: 85 FR 60874: Temporary Amendment for Republic of Cyprus. The latest edition of the BITAR is 28 Sep 2020. 

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders
Amendment of Cuban Assets Control Regulations.
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.

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