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20-0819 Wednesday ” Daily Bugle “

20-0819 Wednesday “Daily Bugle”

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Wednesday, 19 August 2020

  1. No relevant items for today
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. State/DDTC: “Update on Automatic Clearing House (ACH) Debit Instructions”
  1. Ahval: “Turkey Hires U.S Lobbyists to Break Congress’s De Facto Arms Embargo”
  2. Export Compliance Daily: “New DOJ Voluntary Disclosure Policies May Create Complications for Industry, Lawyer Says”
  1. Arent Fox: “BIS Expands the Huawei Foreign Direct Product Rule to Capture a Wide Swath of COTS Products”
  2. Baker McKenzie: “USTR Modifies $7.5 Billion WTO Award Implementation Relating to Illegal Airbus Subsidies [Updated]
  3. Kelley Drye: “BIS Confirms: Entity List Restrictions Apply to All Parties, Including Freight Forwarders and Purchasers”
  4. Thomsen and Burke: “Updates to Huawei, Entity List and Foreign Direct Product Rule”
  1. ECS Presents:”3rd Annual ITAR/EAR Symposium and Managing ITAR/EAR Complexities”
  2. FCC Academy Presents 4 Webinars: U.S. Export Controls: ITAR & EAR | FMS | Designing and Implementing an ICP
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

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OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

(Source: Federal Register)

 

* Commerce/BIS: RULES; Addition of Huawei Non-U.S. Affiliates to the Entity List, the Removal of Temporary General License, and Amendments to General Prohibition Three (Foreign-Produced Direct Product Rule) [Pub. Date: 20 Aug 2020] (PDF)
 

* Commerce/BIS: RULES; Clarification of Entity List Requirements for Listed Entities When Acting as a Party to the Transaction under the Export Administration Regulations) [Pub. Date: 20 Aug 2020] (PDF)

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a23. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)

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(Source: State/DDTC, 19 Aug 2020)
 
Pursuant to ITAR Section 122.3(a), when a new or renewal registrant is using the ACH Debit payment method to pay the registration fee in DECCS Registration, the registrant must include DDTC Account Number 1900000128 with payment information to make a successful payment transaction. The registrant will experience a payment failure if the DDTC Account Number is not used.

 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

(Source: Ahval, 17 Aug 2020) [Excerpts]
 
Congressional leaders have blocked major U.S. arms sales to Turkey for almost two years in response to Ankara’s purchase of Russian S-400 missile systems, which the United States says threatens the F-35 fighter jet’s stealth capabilities. Turkey was subsequently ejected from the joint F-35 programme.
The congressional hold on arms sales, first reported last week by Defense News, has also impacted other key priorities of the Turkish military sector including structural upgrades to its F-16 fighter jets and Turkey’s $1.5 billion sale of attack helicopters to Pakistan.

Concerned by the continued delay of the sale to Pakistan, previously unreported filings required by the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act show that the government-owned Turkish Aerospace Industries hired one of Ankara’s go-to U.S. law firms, Greenberg Traurig LLP, and its frequent subcontractor, Capital Counsel LLC,  to lobby the relevant congressional leaders and the White House to secure the requisite export licences.  …

(Source: Export Compliance Daily, 19 Aug 2020)
 
The Department of Justice’s recent changes to its voluntary disclosure policies (see 1912130047) could lead to complications for companies and were met with backlash from other enforcement agencies, said Robert Clifton Burns, an export control lawyer with Crowell & Moring. The guidance, which outlined benefits for companies that disclose export control and sanctions penalties, can be interpreted as saying industry should first submit their voluntary disclosures to the Justice Department instead of to other agencies, Burns said.

COM COMMENTARY

(Source: Arent Fox, 19 Aug 2020)
 

* Principal Author: Kay C. Georgi, Esq., 1-202.857-6293, Arent Fox
 
On August 17, 2020, the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued a final rule (the Final Rule) (1) adding additional Huawei non-US affiliates to the Entity List, (2) confirming the expiration of the Temporary General License (TGL), and (3) amending the so-called Foreign Direct Product Rule (FDPR).
BIS also issued another final rule clarifying that prohibitions on Entity List entities apply regardless of the role the entity plays in the transaction.
 
(1) Addition of Entities to the Entity List
BIS’s Final Rule added 38 additional non-US affiliates of Huawei to the Entity List because, like the other 115 Huawei entities on the Entity List, they pose “a significant risk of involvement in activities contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.” The additional 38 entities are in 21 countries, and entities located in China’s Hong Kong Special Administration Region are listed under the Entity List heading for China, consistent with other recent export control changes related to Hong Kong.

As with most other entity listings, the export restrictions are high: a license is required for the export, re-export, or transfer (in-country) of any item subject to the EAR, including EAR99 items, and there is a presumption of denial for license applications. The newly listed entities are also subject to the new Foreign Direct Product Rule discussed in 3 below.
A narrow carve-out exists for the release of EAR99 technology or technology controlled for antiterrorism (AT) reasons only when released to members of a standards organization for the purpose of contributing to the revision or development of a standard.

As clarified in the second final rule issued on August 17, 2020, BIS considers the Entity List restrictions to apply regardless of the role of the Huawei entity in an export transaction. As such, exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) are prohibited without a license if a Huawei entity is the purchaser, intermediate or ultimate consignee, or end-user.
 
(2) Removal of Temporary General License
The Final Rule allows the TGL that had been in place for Huawei and its non-US affiliates to expire. The TGL was initially put into place days after Huawei’s original designation on the Entity List back in May 2019, and originally permitted limited transactions with Huawei to support continued operations of networks and equipment, support to existing handsets, cybersecurity research and vulnerability disclosure, and engagements as necessary for the development of 5G standards by a duly recognized standards body. Over the last year, the TGL has been extended and narrowed but is now no longer available.

In place of the TGL is “a more limited permanent authorization that will further protect US national security and foreign policy interests,” related only to cybersecurity research and vulnerability disclosure. In March 2020, BIS asked the public for comments regarding the expiration of the TGL, and this limited authorization is the result. To effect this change, BIS amended the license requirements for designated Huawei entities in the Entity List itself, inserting a footnote that is based on the TGL permitting the export, re-export, or transfer (in-country) of items subject to the EAR if the disclosure to the designated Huawei entity(ies) is limited to “information regarding security vulnerabilities in items owned, possessed, or controlled by Huawei or any of its non-US affiliates when related to the process of providing ongoing security research critical to maintaining the integrity and reliability of existing and currently ‘fully operational network’ and equipment.”

Two of the original authorizations from the TGL are no longer available (continued operation of existing networks and equipment and support to existing handsets) and the authorization related to standards organization has been formalized in an interim final rule from BIS.
 
(3)Foreign Direct Product Rule
As we previously reported, effective May 15, 2020, BIS changed General Prohibition Three, also known as the FDPR, to further limit technology releases to designated Huawei entities, primarily targeted on the semiconductor industry. Specifically, the May 15 rule made the following products subject to the EAR: products designed or produced by a designated Huawei entity, or products of Huawei software or technology if the products were also the direct product of technology or software that was subject to the EAR and fell into a subset of ECCNs (or was the direct product of a plant or a major component of a plant that was the direct product of US- origin “technology” or “software” that falls into a list of specific ECCNs). The ultimate impact of that rule was to require exporters (as well as non-US re-exporters) to be able to identify any Huawei designed or produced products or technology they were supplying to Huawei.
This Final Rule substantially expands the scope of what the FDPR captures for Huawei and other Entity List entities with a footnote 1 restriction. The revised FDPR removes the requirement that the foreign product in question has to be either developed or produced by a designated Huawei entity or be the direct product of Huawei software or technology. Instead, to be captured under the new FDPR, the party exporting, re-exporting or transferring the foreign product only needs to have knowledge that either:
 
(a)The foreign-produced item will be incorporated into, or will be used in the “production” or “development” of any “part,” “component,” or “equipment” produced, purchased, or ordered by any [Huawei entity on the Entity List] in the license requirement column of this supplement; or
(b)[A Huawei entity on the Entity List] is a party to any transaction involving the foreign-produced item, e.g., as a “purchaser,” “intermediate consignee,” “ultimate consignee,” or “end-user.”

In other words, the FDPR has gone from covering only products developed or produced by Huawei or that are the direct product of Huawei’s software or technology – essentially Huawei designed or developed products – to capturing all commercial off the shelf (COTS) products that: 1) just happen to be going into something that eventually will be ordered or purchased by Huawei – regardless of whether Huawei takes delivery of the item; or 2) are part of a transaction to which Huawei is otherwise a party.
The FDPR items still need to be the direct product of US-origin technology or software that fall into the enumerated ECCNs, or the direct product of a plant where a major component of the plant is the direct product of one of the enumerated ECCNs. Thus, they still need to be either: 
 
(i)   The direct product of “technology” or “software” subject to the EAR and specified in Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 3D001, 3D991, 3E001, 3E002, 3E003, 3E991, 4D001, 4D993, 4D994, 4E001, 4E992, 4E993, 5D001, 5D991, 5E001, or 5E991 of the Commerce Control List (CCL); or

(ii)Produced by any plant or major component of a plant that is located outside the United States, when the plant or major component of a plant, whether made in the US or a foreign country, itself is a direct product of US-origin “technology” or “software” subject to the EAR that is specified in ECCN 3D001, 3D991, 3E001, 3E002, 3E003, 3E991, 4D001, 4D993, 4D994, 4E001, 4E992, 4E993, 5D001, 5D991, 5E001, or 5E991 of the CCL.
 
But critically they no longer have to be designed or produced by Huawei. So COTS products that are the direct product of US-origin software or technology that fall into the enumerated ECCNs above, or the direct product of a plant where a major component of the plant is the direct product of one of the enumerated ECCNs, now need a license for export, re-export or transfer, if the company engaging in the transaction has a reason to know that Huawei will order or purchase a downstream product containing those items or is otherwise a party to the transaction.

Unlike most license applications related to designated Huawei entities, BIS will consider licenses on a case-by-case basis if the sophistication and capabilities of the technology fall below the 5G level.
 
(4) Parts of the Rule Go Into Effect Immediately
The Final Rule includes two savings clauses: one for the added entities and removal of the TGL, and for the FDPR change relating to the foreign direct product (FDP) of the technology/software ECCNs, and one for the FDPR change related to the FDP of plants and major components of plants.
 
For New Entities, TGL Removal, and the FDPR relating to the FDP of the technology/software ECCNs: The rule is effective nearly immediately. Exports or reexports that were already en route on the date the Final Rule was filed for public inspection, which we understand to be August 17, 2020, may proceed.
 
For the FDP of plants and major components of plants: Shipments of foreign-produced items that are the direct product of plants or major components of plants that have started production on August 17, 2020, can proceed provided they are exported from abroad, re-exported, or transferred (in-country) before midnight (local time) on September 14, 2020.
 
(5)Conclusion
As the Huawei and telecom drama continues to unfold, it is clear the US Government is now on a fast track to revise its export control and related laws to respond to perceived national security threats posed by China, as well as Huawei and its affiliates in particular. Exporters, particularly in the semiconductor industry but also downstream industries, are advised to continue to maintain a robust export compliance program, and be prepared to make changes on little to no notice.

Ultimately BIS and the US Government keep sending the same message: if you are legally selling to Huawei, the US Government will revise its regulations to ensure that you are no longer legally selling to Huawei.

(Source: Baker McKenzie, 19 Aug 2020) [Excerpts]
 
* Principal Author: Stuart P. Seidel, Esq., 1-202-452-7088, Baker McKenzie
 
On August 12, 2020, the US Trade Representative (USTR) issued a press release stating that, as required by U.S. law, the USTR is issuing a modification to the list of products subject to WTO-authorized additional duties in the United States’ successful WTO challenge to subsidies for large civil aircraft provided by the European Union, France, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom. USTR is removing from the tariff list certain products from Greece and the United Kingdom and adding an equivalent amount of trade from France and Germany.  The changes are modest; the amount of products subject to countermeasures will remain unchanged at $7.5 billion and the tariff rates will remain unchanged at 15% for aircraft and 25% for all other products.
 
“The EU and member states have not taken the actions necessary to come into compliance with WTO decisions,” Ambassador Robert Lighthizer stated.
“The United States, however, is committed to obtaining a long-term resolution to this dispute.  Accordingly, the United States will begin a new process with the EU in an effort to reach an agreement that will remedy the conduct that harmed the U.S. aviation industry and workers and will ensure a level playing field for U.S. companies.”  
 
The modifications were published on August 18, 2020, in the Federal Register Notice of Modification of Section 301 Action: Enforcement of U.S. WTO Rights in Large Civil Aircraft Dispute.
 
The notice [Docket No. USTR-2019-0003] indicated that the modifications (set out in Annex I to the notice) are applicable with respect to products that are entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight savings time on September 1, 2020.
In order to implement the USTR determination, effective September 1, 2020, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTSUS is modified by Annex 1 to this notice. The additional duties provided for in the HTSUS subheadings established by Annex 1 apply in addition to all other applicable duties, fees, exactions, and charges.

Any product listed in Annex 1 to the notice, except any product that is eligible for admission under ‘domestic status’ as defined in 19 CFR 146.43, which is subject to the additional duty imposed by USTR’s determination, and is admitted into a US foreign trade zone on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight savings time on September 1, 2020, only may be admitted as ‘privileged foreign status’ as defined in 19 CFR 146.41. Such products will be subject upon entry for consumption to any ad valorem rates of duty or quantitative limitations related to the classification under the applicable HTSUS subheading.
 
As stated in the February 21, 2020, notice, the USTR has determined that the action may be revised as appropriate immediately upon any imposition of additional duties on US products in connection with the Large Civil Aircraft dispute or with the EU’s WTO challenge to the alleged subsidization of US large civil aircraft.

Annex I provides: 
A. Effective with respect to goods entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time September 1, 2020, U.S. note 21 to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States is modified as provided herein:
(1) U.S. note 21(a) to such subchapter is modified by deleting “9903.89.52” each place that it appears and inserting “9903.89.55” in lieu thereof.
(2) U.S. note 21(e) to such subchapter is modified by deleting “0406.90.99”.
(3) U.S. note 21(l) to such subchapter is modified by inserting “1905.31.00” in numerical order.
(4) U.S. note 21(n) to such subchapter is modified by deleting “1905.31.00”.
(5) U.S. note 21(q) to such subchapter is modified by deleting “subheading 8214.90.60” and inserting “subheadings 2007.99.05, 2007.99.10, 2007.99.15, 2007.99.20, 2007.99.25, 2007.99.35, 2007.99.60, or 8214.90.60” in lieu thereof.
(6) U.S. note 21 to such subchapter is modified by inserting in alphabetical order:
“(r) Subheading 9903.89.55 and superior text thereto shall apply to all products of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, or the United Kingdom that are classified in subheading 0406.90.99.”

(Source: Kelley Drye, 19 Aug 2020)
 
* Principal Author: Robert Slack, Esq., 1-202-342-8622, Kelley Drye
 
On August 20, 2020, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will publish a final rule confirming that the Entity List licensing requirements apply to all transactions in which a listed party plays a role – including where the listed party is the ultimate consignee, end-user, purchaser, or intermediate consignee.  The new rule formally codifies longstanding BIS policy on the scope of the Entity List’s requirements, which generally prohibit exports, reexports and in-country transfers of items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) that involve a party on the Entity List without a license.
Prohibited party screening programs should screen every party to a transaction to properly identify shipments that implicate the Entity List’s restrictive controls.

(Source: Thomsen and Burke, 18 Aug 2020)
 
* Principal Author: Roszel C. Thomsen II, Esq., 1-410539-2596, Thomsen and Burke
 
On August 17, 2020, the Commerce Department issued a press release and BIS announced two final rules amending the Foreign Direct Product Rule (FDPR) and the Entity List of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) related to transactions with Huawei and other Entity List parties. These rules are effective immediately, and are scheduled for publication in the Federal Register on August 20th. Collectively, they make several important changes to the EARas discussed below:
 
Revisions to the FDPR Related to Huawei Transactions
 
BIS amended the FDPR described in Section 736.2(b)(3)(vi) of General Prohibition Three. Under the new rule, you may not export from abroad, reexport or transfer any foreign-produced item without a license if:
 
(1) You “know” that either: 
 
  • The foreign-produced item will be incorporated into, or will be used in the “production” or “development” of any “part,” “component,” or “equipment” produced, purchased, or ordered by any Huawei listed entity; or 
 
  • Any Huawei listed entity is a party to any transaction involving the foreign-produced item, e.g., as a “purchaser,” “intermediate consignee,” “ultimate consignee,” or “end-user”; and 
 
(2) The foreign-produced item is either:
 
  • A direct product of “technology” or “software” subject to the EAR and specified in certain listed Export Control Classification Numbers (ECCNs), or
 
  • Produced by any plant or major component of a plant that is located outside the United States, when the plant or major component of a plant, whether made in the U.S. or a foreign country, itself is a direct product of U.S.-origin “technology” or “software” subject to the EAR that specified in certain ECCNs.
 
The listed ECCNs are 3E001, 3E002, 3E003, 4E001, 5E001, 3D001, 4D001, and 5D001, as well as 3E991, 4E992, 4E993, 5E991, 3D991, 4D993, 4D994, and 5D991.
 
The “knowledge” requirement is defined broadly in the EAR to include “reason to know”. Enhanced due diligence on the entire supply chain (beginning with EDA software, including IP, and continuing to and through the capital equipment in the manufacturing facility) will be required in order to ensure that the resulting integrated circuit (or other product) is not subject to the EAR. Many companies will have to pivot to licensing strategies in order to supply technology items to Huawei or for use in Huawei products.
 
The FDPR Rule includes a Savings Clause, which notes that items that are subject to the EAR only because they are covered by the new FDPR rule based on being produced by a plant or major component of a plant meeting the requirements in paragraph (b) to Footnote 1, are subject to a special Savings Clause. Shipments of these foreign-produced items that started “production” prior to August 17, 2020 may proceed as not being subject to the EAR, or under the previous license exception eligibility, so long as they have been exported, reexported, or transferred (in-country) on or before September 14, 2020. Any such items not exported from abroad, reexported, or transferred (in-country) before midnight (local time) on September 14, 2020, will be subject to the new requirements.
 
Addition of 38 New Huawei Affiliates to the Entity List
BIS added 38 new Huawei affiliates to the Entity List found in Supplement No. 4 to Part 744 of the EAR. These entities are located in China, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Egypt, France, Germany, Hing Kong, India, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Peru, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and United Kingdom. The new entities include:
 
  • Huawei Cloud
  • Huawei OpenLab
  • Huawei Technologies Dusseldorf
  • Huawei Technologies R&D UK
  • Toga Networks
 
BIS also added new affiliates to existing Entity list entries for Huawei affiliates, and made address changes to others. The affiliate updates include:
 
  • Two new aliases for Huawei Device Co., Ltd: (1) Huawei Device and (2) Songshan Lake Southern Factory
  • One new alias for Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.: Huawei Technology
 
Clarification for Entity List Entities Acting as Party to the Transaction under the EAR 
BIS is also clarifying the supplemental license requirements for parties listed on the Entity List. Specifically, this final rule clarifies the Entity List’s supplemental licensing requirements to state that these end-user controls apply to any listed entity when that entity is acting as a purchaser, intermediate or ultimate consignee, or end-user as defined in the EAR. 
 
This clarification means that the licensing requirements include situations where an Entity List party acts only as a “purchaser” in a transaction, but does not itself take possession or delivery of the item. “Purchaser” is defined as “the person abroad who has entered into the transaction to purchase an item for delivery to the ultimate consignee.”
 
The new rule applies to all Entity List parties, and not just Huawei and its affiliates.
 
Removal of Temporary General License for Huawei Entities
BIS removed the Temporary General License (TGL) authorizing certain activities involving Huawei, which was originally published on May 29, 2019, extended and amended on August 21, 2019, and most recently extended on May 12, 2020. In order to implement this U.S. Government decision, this final rule removes supplement no. 7 to part 744 and other references in the EAR to the TGL. 
 
Authorizations for Huawei Related to Cybersecurity Research and Vulnerability Disclosure
The new rules did, however, move one of the TGL’s authorizations for cybersecurity research and vulnerability disclosure to a new Footnote 2 to the Entity List, and made Footnote 2 applicable to listed Huawei entries. Footnote 2 to the Entity List now reads as follows:
 
  • Cybersecurity research and vulnerability disclosure. The following exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) to Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. (Huawei) and its non-U.S. affiliates on the Entity List for cybersecurity research and vulnerability disclosure subject to other provisions of the EAR are excluded from the Entity List license requirements: when the disclosure to Huawei and/or to its listed non-U.S. affiliates is limited to information regarding security vulnerabilities in items owned, possessed, or controlled by Huawei or any of its non-U.S. affiliates when related to the process of providing ongoing security research critical to maintaining the integrity and reliability of existing and currently ‘fully operational network’ and equipment. A ‘fully operational network’ refers to a ‘third party’ network providing services to the ‘third party’s’ customers. The term ‘third party’ refers to a party that is not Huawei, one of its listed non-U.S. affiliates, or the exporter, reexporter, or transferor, but rather an organization such as a telecommunications service provider.
 

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

  
* What: 3rd Annual ITAR/EAR Symposium and Managing ITAR/EAR Complexities 2-Day Webinar
* When: September 16-17, 2020
* Where: Your Computer
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Solutions & Consulting (ECS)
* ECS and Guest Speakers: Suzanne Palmer, Mal Zerden, Lisa Bencivenga, Debi Davis, Scott Jackson
* Register: here or write to liz@exportcompliancesolutions.com or call 1-866-238-4018
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ITAR & EAR from a non-US perspective
Tuesday, 8 September 2020
More Info
Special Offer: $199
The ABC of Foreign Military Sales (FMS)
Tuesday, 29 September 2020
Designing and Implementing an ICP
Tuesday, 6 October 2020 More Info
Wednesday, 7 October
More Info
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a113. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)
 

* John Dryden (19 Aug 1631 – 12 May 1700; was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was appointed England’s first Poet Laureate in 1668.)
  – “Beware the fury of a patient man.” 
  – “If you be pungent, be brief; for it is with words as with sunbeams – the more they are condensed the deeper they burn.”
  – “Happy the man, and happy he alone, he who can call today his own; he who, secure within, can say, tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.

 

5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499:

Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation. 
DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. 
31 Jul 2020: 85 FR 45998: Revision of the Export Administration Regulations and Suspension of License Exceptions for Hong Kong. 
DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.  
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)

: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense. 

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810.    23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359: comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.  

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 
DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War. 
14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 

29 Jul 2020: 85 FR 45513 Extension to Certain Temporary Suspensions, Modifications, and Exceptions due to Corona Virus.  The latest edition of the BITAR is 29 July 2020.  

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

17 Jul 2020: 85 FR 43436: Nicaragua Sanctions Regulations. 

 
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.

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