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20-0803 Monday “Daily Bugle”

20-0803 Monday “Daily Bugle”

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Monday, 3 August 2020

  1. USTR: “Extension of Particular Exclusions Expiring in October 2020 Granted under the $34 Billion Action Pursuant to Section 301”
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS:(No new postings)
  3. State/DDTC: (No new postings)
  4. DHS/CBP: “GUIDANCE: Section 301 Tranche 4A – $300B Eighth Round of Product Exclusions from China and Section 301 Technical Corrections”
  1. Pledge Times: “Europe’s Defense Companies Want to do Without US Technology”
  1. BakerMcKenzie: “CBP Issues Guidance on 8th Round of Product Exclusions from Tranche 4A”
  2. Law.Com: “Tech Can’t Solve Everything: Citizenship Security Restrictions Bring Document Review Risks”
  3. Steptoe: “OFAC Authorizes Additional Activities Involving GAZ Group”
  4. Thompson Hine: “BIS Publishes Final Rule Suspending EAR License Exceptions for Hong Kong”
  1. Monday List of Ex/Im Job Openings: 46 Jobs Available – 5 New Job Openings This Week
  1. ECTI Presents: Import 101 for Aerospace Professionals Webinar: 26 Aug
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. New Edition of Bartlett’s Annotated ITAR (“BITAR”) is Available 
  3. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  4. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  5. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  6. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

EXIM_a11. USTR: “Extension of Particular Exclusions Expiring in October 2020 Granted under the $34 Billion Action Pursuant to Section 301”

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 46777
: Notice
 
*
AGENCY:
Office of the United States Trade Representative.
*
ACTION:
Notice and request for comments.
*
SUMMARY:
Effective July 6, 2018, the U.S. Trade Representative imposed additional duties on goods of China with an annual trade value of approximately $34 billion as part of the action in the Section 301 investigation of China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation. The U.S. Trade Representative initiated an exclusion process in July 2018 and granted multiple sets of exclusions. In October and December 2019, and February 2020, the U.S. Trade Representative granted exclusions that are scheduled to expire on October 2, 2020. The U.S. Trade Representative has decided to consider a possible extension for up to 12 months of particular exclusions scheduled to expire in October 2020. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) invites public comment on whether to extend particular exclusions.
*
DATES:
August 1, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. ET: The public docket on the web portal at https://comments.USTR.gov will open for parties to submit comments on the possible extension of particular exclusions.
August 30, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. ET: To be assured of consideration, submit written comments on the public docket by this deadline.
*
ADDRESSES:
You must submit all comments through the online portal at https://comments.USTR.gov.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

(Source:
Federal Register)
 
* Treasury/OFAC;
NOTICES
;
Blocking or Unblocking of Persons and Properties
; [Pub. Date: 4 Aug 2020] (PDF)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a23. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Source: DHS/CBP
, 31 Jul 2020) [Excerpts]
 
Cargo Systems Messaging Service
 
BACKGROUND

On July 23, 2020, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) published Federal Register (FR) Notice 85 FR 44563 on certain exclusions from the Section 301 duty related to goods from China ($300B Action – Tranche 4).
These product exclusions relate to the imposed additional duties announced in 84 FR 43304 and 84 FR 45821 on goods covered under list 1/Annex A ($300B Action – Tranche 4).
The product exclusions will retroactively apply as of the September 1, 2019 effective date of the $300 billion action (Tranche 4A), and will extend through September 1, 2020.
The exclusions are available for any product that meets the description as set out in the Annex to 85 FR 44563, regardless of whether the importer filed an exclusion request. Further, the scope of each exclusion is governed by the scope of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States’ (HTSUS) 10-digit headings and product descriptions provided in the Annex to 85 FR 44563, not by the product descriptions set out in any particular request for exclusion.
The functionality for the acceptance of the imported merchandise covered under the eighth round of products from China excluded from the Section 301 Tranche 4A-$300B Action will be available in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) as of 7 a.m. eastern daylight time, August 6, 2020.
GUIDANCE

Instructions for importers, brokers, and filers on submitting entries to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) containing products granted exclusions from the Section 301 measures as set out in 85 FR 44563 are provided below.
Eighth Round of Product Exclusions
  • Paragraph A, subparagraphs (1)-(2) of the Annex stipulates that articles from China, as provided for in U.S. note 20(fff) to this subchapter, will be covered by the exclusion granted by the USTR for imported merchandise that is subject to the exclusion and for which the exclusion is claimed.
  • In addition to reporting the regular Chapters 5, 39, 55, 61, 62, 63, 65, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 92, 93, 95, 96, and 97 classifications of the HTSUS for the imported merchandise as listed in 85 FR 44563, importers shall report HTSUS classification 9903.88.53.
  • Importers shall not submit the corresponding Chapter 99 HTS number for the Section 301 duties when HTS 9903.88.53 is submitted.
Technical Corrections
  • Per paragraph B of the Annex, in addition to reporting the regular Chapters 63 of the HTSUS for the technical amendments listed in U.S. note 20(ddd) covered under the 9903.88.51 product exclusion round, importers shall not submit the corresponding Chapter 99 HTS number for the Section 301 duties when the applicable exclusion 99 number is submitted.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

(Source: Pledge Times, 2 Aug 2020)
 
Rifles, drones, fighter jets: Manufacturers in Germany and France are now trying to become more independent of Washington. Industry experts urge that the situation be assessed realistically.
 
Europa’s armaments companies no longer want to use US technology when building war equipment, also to protect sensitive information. This affects, among other things, the construction of helicopters, the new Bundeswehr assault rifle and the FCAS fighter jet, which is scheduled to fly from 2040. …
 
The background is the US products are subject to the so-called ITAR regulations (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) which keeps controls on products with US technology.  “With ITAR-free and without conditions other American regulatory systems, Europe will have more freedom to be delivered to whom armor protects,” said Florent Chauvancy, sales manager of the helicopter engine division of the French manufacturer Safran. “The benefits of 100 percent European products also means that the data remains out of operation in Europe and do not migrate into the hands of non-European countries.” …
 
The US has just announced that thousands of US troops will be withdrawn from Germany. Europe’s defense industry supported their projects, to reduce dependence on the US. “To be a real reliable partner for NATO and the Americans in transatlantic alliances, we need to develop and build its own European capabilities,” said Airbus Armor Officer Dirk Hoke.
 
Industry experts, however, also call for a realistic assessment. If, for example, the Bundeswehr wanted to buy new heavy helicopters, there were currently only two models from the USA to choose from.

COM COMMENTARY

(Source: BakerMcKenzie, 31 Jul 2020)
 
* Author:
Stuart P. Seidel
, Esq., 1-202-452 -7088, BakerMcKenzie
 
 
Background
On July 23, 2020, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) published Federal Register (FR) Notice 85 FR 44563 on certain exclusions from the Section 301 duty related to goods from China ($300B Action – Tranche 4). 
These product exclusions relate to the imposed additional duties announced in 84 FR 43304 and 84 FR 45821 on goods covered under list 1/Annex A ($300B Action – Tranche 4).  
The product exclusions will retroactively apply as of the September 1, 2019 effective date of the $300 billion action (Tranche 4A), and will extend through September 1, 2020.  

The exclusions are available for any product that meets the description as set out in the Annex to 85 FR 44563, regardless of whether the importer filed an exclusion request.  Further, the scope of each exclusion is governed by the scope of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States’ (HTSUS) 10-digit headings and product descriptions provided in the Annex to 85 FR 44563, not by the product descriptions set out in any particular request for exclusion.

The functionality for the acceptance of the imported merchandise covered under the seventh round of products from China excluded from the Section 301 Tranche 4A-$300B Action will be available in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) as of 7 a.m. eastern daylight time, July 16, 2020.

Guidance
Instructions for importers, brokers, and filers on submitting entries to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) containing products granted exclusions from the Section 301 measures as set out in 85 FR 44563 are provided below.
 
  • Paragraph A, subparagraphs (1)-(2) of the Annex stipulates that articles from China, as provided for in U.S. note 20(fff) to this subchapter, will be covered by the exclusion granted by the USTR for imported merchandise that is subject to the exclusion and for which the exclusion is claimed.
  • In addition to reporting the regular Chapters 5, 39, 55, 61, 62, 63, 65, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 92, 93, 95, 96, and 97 classifications of the HTSUS for the imported merchandise as listed in 85 FR 44563, importers shall report HTSUS classification 9903.88.53.
  • Importers shall not submit the corresponding Chapter 99 HTS number for the Section 301 duties when HTS 9903.88.53 is submitted.

Technical Corrections
  • Per paragraph B of the Annex, in addition to reporting the regular Chapters 63 of the HTSUS for the technical amendments listed in U.S. note 20(ddd) covered under the 9903.88.51 product exclusion round, importers shall not submit the corresponding Chapter 99 HTS number for the Section 301 duties when the applicable exclusion 99 number is submitted.
 
Additional Information
Imports which have been granted a product exclusion from the Section 301 measures, and which are not subject to the Section 301 duties, are not covered by the Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) provisions of the Section 301 Federal Register notices, but instead are subject to the FTZ provisions in 19 CFR part 146. 

Duty exclusions granted by the USTR under this exclusion are retroactive for imports on or after the initial effective date of September 1, 2019. To request a refund of Section 301 duties paid on previous imports of products granted duty exclusions by the USTR, importers may file a Post Summary Correction (PSC) if within the PSC filing timeframe.   If the entry is beyond the PSC filing timeframe, importers may protest the liquidation if within the protest filing timeframe. The latest guidance on the process for submitting retroactive claims for product exclusions to CBP is found in CSMS 42566154.

In situations where an importer has requested a product exclusion and the request is pending with the USTR, importers or their licensed representative may submit a request to extend the liquidation of impacted unliquidated entry summaries to CBP.
Reminder: importers, brokers, and/or filers should refer to CSMS 39587858 (Entry Summary Order of Reporting for Multiple HTS when 98 or 99 HTS are required) for guidance when filing an entry summary in which a heading or subheading in Chapter 99 is claimed on imported merchandise.

For ease of reference, a summary of Section 301 duties and product exclusion notifications is attached. 

Questions from the importing community concerning ACE entry rejections involving product exclusions should be referred to their CBP Client Representative. Questions related to Section 301 entry-filing requirements, please refer to CSMS message #42203908 (Information on Trade Remedy Questions and Resources) https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCBP/bulletins/283fb04.

(Source: Law.com, 31 Jul 2020) [Excerpts]
 
While legal technology can help segment data access, some warn significant discussions are needed before reviewers are blocked from projects because of their citizenship.  Prohibiting document reviewers access to data based on their country of origin or citizenship status is fairly common, e-discovery providers say. But while technology will loosen the limitation’s burden, in-depth discussions with clients are still necessary to mitigate the risk of discrimination charges and fines.
 
Oftentimes denying a document reviewer access to data stems from the client requiring reviewers to obtain national security clearance. Relativity discovery counsel and legal education director David Horrigan noted that such a clearance hinges on an applicant being a U.S. citizen. “It happens all the time especially in a place like Washington, D.C., when you have so many matters that require security clearance.”
 
A wide array of public and private entities which are “usually operating under a government regulation” place country-specific restrictions on access to sensitive data, noted Casepoint vice president of client services Jessica Robinson.  She added, however, that most e-discovery software and service providers have controls to block and track data access to ensure the client’s requests are met.
 
Still, while easy to overcome, recent fines should remind law firms and document review vendors that denying document review work based on citizenship can run into issues. Last week, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer, legal staffing provider Law Resources and the U.S. Department of Justice agreed to a $56,500 civil penalty over claims the firm and vendor didn’t allow an attorney to participate in a document review project because of the reviewer’s dual citizenship status.
 
Under Arnold & Porter’s direction, Law Resources screened out U.S. citizens with dual citizenship and non-U.S. citizens with work authorization from the firm’s document review project, the Justice Department wrote in a press release. The DOJ said the alleged actions violated the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act.  The DOJ also noted that Arnold & Porter “improperly interpreted” the requirements of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations.
 
“This case involves a single incident where the firm mistakenly provided a third-party vendor inaccurate information about the criteria for selecting contractors for a document review,” Arnold & Porter wrote in a statement provided to The National Law Journal. International law firm Clifford Chance also faced similar allegations and paid a $132,000 penalty in 2018.
 
Despite being a common occurrence for some, managed review and e-discovery provider Update Legal Inc. CEO April Pish said she hasn’t seen requests to not place a document reviewer on an assignment because of their country of birth.  “When they are not legally allowed to see data we will push back and have an educated conversation about why the information is not privy to them and why,” she said. “Not just, ‘Hey I think this may involve international arms [and] there may be documents about it.'”  While Pish agreed there’s likely software to segment data access, she noted Arnold & Porter’s misinterpretation of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations highlights the need for clarity before limiting project opportunities.  “It should give every agency pause and to investigate why that is being requested, to ensure they’re doing the right thing and not making discriminatory decisions based on someone’s citizenship,” she said.


(Source: Steptoe, 31 Jul 2020)
 
* Principal Author:
A. Cherie Tremaine
, Esq., 1-202-429-1308, Steptoe
 
On July 16, 2020, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) issued two new Ukraine-/Russia-related general licenses:  General License 15I, Authorizing Certain Activities Involving GAZ Group, which replaces General License 15H; and General License 13O, Authorizing Certain Transactions Necessary to Divest or Transfer Debt, Equity, or Other Holdings in GAZ Group, which replaces General License 13N.  OFAC also updated nine related FAQs – 570, 571, 586, 588, 589, 590, 591, 592, and 625 – on July 22.

Most notably, General License 15I expands the scope of the pre-existing authorization (covering only maintenance, wind-down and a very limited set of additional activities involving GAZ Group) to include new activities relating to the manufacture and sale of vehicles and related products.  Although many activities were able to continue under the prior GAZ Group general licenses (due to the expansive definition of “maintenance” in FAQ 625), this appears to be an important development for GAZ Group and for prospective or new business partners of GAZ Group.  OFAC has not disclosed any specific developments triggering this change, such as with respect to the ownership or control of Oleg Deripaska in GAZ Group, although the new license does provide for new reporting obligations related to ownership and control of GAZ Group.

General License 15I authorizes certain activities, subject to numerous limitations 
stated therein, for 190 days – from July 16, 2020 through 12:01 a.m. eastern standard time, January 22, 2021 – which is over a month longer than any of its predecessors.
General License 15H only authorized transactions and activities necessary for certain maintenance and wind-down activities, as well as research, development, and related activities in connection with safety and emissions standards.  General License 15I expands the scope of that pre-existing general license by authorizing the following types of transactions and activities that are “ordinarily incident and necessary to the manufacture and sale of existing and new models of vehicles, components, and spare parts, including automobiles, light commercial vehicles, trucks, buses, engines/powertrains, produced by GAZ Group, or any entity in which GAZ Group owns, directly or indirectly, a 50 percent or greater interest”:
  • Research, design, development, production, modification, upgrade, certification, distribution, and marketing;
  • Provision or receipt of services, including warranty, maintenance, logistics, storage, shipping, insurance, security, brokerage, legal, banking and financial (including financing and renegotiation of debt), technical and engineering, advertising, and customer services;
  • Entry into joint ventures, contract manufacturing agreements, supplier contracts, and other new contracts associated with [such] activities [];
  • Payment and receipt of dividends and other funds owed by or to GAZ Group relating to [such] activities [];
  • The conduct of financial transactions associated with [such] activities []; and
  • Activities necessary for compliance with [a GAZ Group reporting requirement discussed below], including financial auditing services.

Additionally, General License 15I contains new reporting requirements:  First, GAZ Group must provide OFAC with a monthly certification that “GAZ Group is not acting for or on behalf of Mr. Oleg Deripaska” or any other person on OFAC’s SDN List, “and that control over the actions, policies, and decisions of the company rests with GAZ Group’s Board of Directors and shareholders”; and second, GAZ Group must provide, on a quarterly basis, information including audited financial statements, JVs, financing agreements of $5 million or more, and board composition changes and meeting minutes.  Furthermore, U.S. persons are required to report to OFAC about their activities pursuant to this general license.
Notably, this general license does not authorize the unblocking of blocked property (except funds used for activities authorized by this general license), and GAZ Group remains on the SDN list.

For background information on General Licenses 13 and 15, see our prior analyses from May 23, 2018 (General License 15), June 5, 2018 (General Licenses 15 and 13B), and April 12, 2018 (General License 13).


(Source: Trump and Trade, 31 Jul 2020)
 
The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has published the final rule in the Federal Register amending the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to suspend all License Exceptions for Hong Kong that provide preferential treatment as compared to those available for exports to China.  This amendment to the EAR implements the announcement BIS made on June 30, 2020, which provided that, as of June 30, these License Exceptions were no longer available for exports and reexports to Hong Kong or transfers within Hong Kong.  Additionally, the final rule is adding a new, Hong Kong-specific paragraph to EAR Section 740.2 (“Restrictions on all License Exceptions”), as well as making some other conforming changes to Section 740.2.

A License Exception is an authorization contained in Part 740 of the EAR that allows exports, reexports, or transfers (in-country) of items subject to the EAR that would otherwise require a license for export to the destination.  As a result of the suspensions, absent a license from BIS, no items subject to the EAR may be exported to Hong Kong, reexported to Hong Kong, or transferred within Hong Kong unless it would otherwise be eligible for export to China under the applicable reason for control or a License Exception available for exports to China.  The suspended License Exceptions for Hong Kong include:
 
(1)
Shipments of Limited Value (LVS) (§
740.3);
(2)
Shipments to Group B Countries (GBS) (§
740.4);
(3)
Technology and Software under Restriction (TSR) (§
740.6);
(4)
Computers, Tier 1 only (APP) (§
740.7(c));
(5)
Temporary Imports, Exports, Reexports, and Transfers (in-country) (TMP) (§
740.9(a)(11), (b)(2)(ii)(C, and (b)(5));
(6)
Servicing and Replacement Parts and Equipment (RPL) (§
740.10(a)(3)(viii), (a)(4), (b)(1) except as permitted to Country Group D:5, and (b)(3)(i)(F) and (ii)(C));
(7)
Governments (GOV) (§
740.11(c)(1)-Cooperating Governments only));
(8)
Gift Parcels and Humanitarian Donations (GFT) (§
740.12);
(9)
Technology and Software Unrestricted (TSU) (§
740.13);
(10) 
Baggage (BAG) (§
740.14) (except as permitted by §
740.14(d));
(11) 
Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS) (§
740.15(b)(1), (b)(2), (c));
(12)
Additional Permissive Reexports (APR) (§
740.16(a) and (j)); and
(13)
Strategic Trade Authorization (STA) (§
740.20(c)(2)).
 
BIS has taken this action as part of a broader U.S. policy change toward Hong Kong in response to the newly imposed security measures on Hong Kong by China. For more information on related developments concerning Hong Kong, please see Trump and Trade posts for June 1, 2020June 30, 2020, and July 16, 2020.

TE EX/IM MOVERS & SHAKERS

(Source: Events & Jobs Editor)
 

* Arrow Electronics; Centennial, Colorado; 
Transportation Import/Export Specialist II;
Job ID:
R178819; Contact Details:
ERIK.EDWARDS@arrow.com

 
* ENSCO; Springfield, VA; Contracts Administrator
 
 
*
Torrent Pharma Inc
;
Levittown
, PA;
DEA Associate Coordinator
 
*
 U Mass
;
Amherst Center, MA
;
Export Control Compliance Specialist
 
Click here to see the full list. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

(Source:
Ashleigh Foor
)
 
* What: 
Import 101 for Aerospace Professionals
* When: 26 Aug; 1:00 p.m. (EDT)
* Where: Webinar
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Training Institute (ECTI)
* ECTI Speaker: 
Marc Binder
* Register:
here
or Ashleigh Foor, 1-540-433-3977,

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a113. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)
 
* P.D. James
(Phyllis Dorothy James, Baroness James of Holland Park; 3 Aug 1920 – 27 Nov 2014; known professionally as P. D. James, was an English crime writer. She rose to fame for her series of detective novels featuring police commander and poet Adam Dalgliesh.)

  – “What a child doesn’t receive he can seldom later give.”
  – “I believe that political correctness can be a form of linguistic fascism, and it sends shivers down the spine of my generation who went to war against fascism.”
 

Tony Bennett
(Anthony Dominick Benedetto; born August 3, 1926; is an American singer of traditional pop standards, big band, show tunes, and jazz. In 1962, Bennett recorded his signature song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”. Bennett staged a comeback in the late 1980s and 1990s. He has won 19 Grammy Awards (including a Lifetime Achievement Award, presented in 2001) and two Emmy Awards, and was named an NEA Jazz Master and a Kennedy Center Honoree. Bennett has sold over 50 million records worldwide.)
  – “I think one of the reasons I’m popular again is because I’m wearing a tie. You have to be different.”
 
Monday is pun day.
* How was Rome split in two? With a pair of Ceasars. 
* I bought a boat because it was for sail.
* Being vegetarian was a huge missed-steak.
* Why were the Indians here first?  They had reservations.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.

 

5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499:

Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation. 
DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. 
DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.  
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)

: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense. 

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810.    23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359: comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.  

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 
DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War. 
14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 

29 Jul 2020: 85 FR 45513 Extension to Certain Temporary Suspensions, Modifications, and Exceptions due to Corona Virus.  The latest edition of the BITAR is 29 July 2020. 

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

17 Jul 2020:
85 FR 43436:
Nicaragua Sanctions Regulations. 

 
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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