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20-0625 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

20-0625 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

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Thursday, 25 June 2020

  1. State Department: “Sanctions Actions Blocking Property and Suspending Entry of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Syria”/
  2. Treasury/OFAC: “Notice of OFAC Sanctions Actions”
  3. USTR: “Comments Requested on Extension of 3rd Set of 301 Exclusions”
  4. USTR: “Comments Requested on Extension of 2nd Set of 301 Exclusions”
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. DHS/CBP: “Updated Duty Deferral Create/Update”
  4. State/DDTC: (No new postings)
  5. Treasury/OFAC: “Update to OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) and Blocked Persons”
  6. EU Council: “Declaration on the Alignment οf Certain Third Countries Concerning Restrictive Measures Against Syria”
  1. BBC News: “Trump Administration Claims Huawei ‘Backed by Chinese Military’ “
  2. WORLDecr: “BIS Implements Australia Group Changes”
  1. Steptoe: “Three Key Takeaways from OFAC’s Latest Venezuela Sanctions Actions”
  2. ST&R Trade Report: “More China List 2, All Current China List 4A Tariff Exclusions Considered for Extension”
  3. Tuttle Law: “Update on EU Customs and Trade”
  1. ECTI Presents: UK/EU Export Controls and Sanctions 101 Webinar; 30 Jun
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  4. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  5. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

(Source:
Federal Register, 25 Jun 2020)[Excerpts]
 
85 FR 38236: Notice
* SUMMARY: The Secretary of State imposed sanctions on one individual on March 17, 2020 pursuant to E.O. 13894, Blocking Property and Suspending Entry of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Syria. … 
* DATES: The Secretary of State’s determination and selection of certain sanctions to be imposed upon the one individual identified in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section were effective on March 17, 2020. … 
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Taylor Ruggles, Director, Office of Economic Sanctions Policy and Implementation, Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520, tel.: (202) 647 7677, email: RugglesTV@state.gov.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
85 FR 38251: Notice of OFAC Sanctions Actions
* AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury.
* ACTION: Notice.
* SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of one or more persons that have been placed on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List based on OFAC’s determination that one or more applicable legal criteria were satisfied. All property and interests in property subject to U.S. jurisdiction of these persons are blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with them.
* DATES: See Supplementary Information section for applicable date(s).
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: OFAC: Associate Director for Global Targeting, 202-622-2420; … 

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
85 FR 38243: Notice
* AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.
* ACTION: Notice and request for comments.
* SUMMARY: Effective August 23, 2018, the U.S. Trade Representative imposed additional duties on goods of China with an annual trade value of approximately $16 billion as part of the action in the Section 301 investigation of China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation. The U.S. Trade Representative initiated the exclusion process in September 2018 and granted multiple sets of exclusions. The third set of exclusions was granted in October 2019, and are scheduled to expire on October 2, 2020. The U.S. Trade Representative has decided to consider a possible extension for up to 12 months of particular exclusions granted in October 2019. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) invites public comment on whether to extend particular exclusions.
* DATES: July 1, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. ET: The public docket on the web portal at https://comments.USTR.gov will open for parties to submit comments on the possible extension of particular exclusions. July 30, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. ET: To be assured of consideration, submit written comments on the public docket by this deadline.
* ADDRESSES: You must submit all comments through the online portal: https://comments.USTR.gov.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Associate General Counsel Philip Butler or Assistant General Counsel Benjamin Allen at (202) 395-5725.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source:
Federal Register
, 25 Jun 2020)

 
85 FR 38237: Notice
* AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.
* ACTION: Notice and request for comments.
* SUMMARY: Effective August 23, 2018, the U.S. Trade Representative imposed additional duties on goods of China with an annual trade value of approximately $16 billion as part of the action in the Section 301 investigation of China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation. The U.S. Trade Representative initiated the exclusion process in September 2018 and granted multiple sets of exclusions. The second set of exclusions was granted in September 2019, and are scheduled to expire on September 20, 2020. The U.S. Trade Representative has decided to consider a possible extension for up to 12 months of particular exclusions granted in September 2019. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) invites public comment on whether to extend particular exclusions.
* DATES: July 1, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. ET: The public docket on the web portal at https://comments.USTR.gov will open for parties to submit comments on the possible extension of particular exclusions. July 30, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. ET: To be assured of consideration, submit written comments on the public docket by this deadline.
* ADDRESSES: You must submit all comments through the online portal: https://comments.USTR.gov.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Associate General Counsel Philip Butler or Assistant General Counsel Benjamin Allen at (202) 395-5725.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

(Source: Federal Register)

* State Department: NOTICES; Sanctions Actions Blocking Property and Suspending Entry of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Syria [Pub. Date: 26 Jun 2020] (PDF)
 
* USTR: NOTICES; Request for Comments Concerning the Extension of Particular Exclusions Granted Under the 300 Billion Dollar Action Pursuant to Section 301: China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation [Pub. Date: 26 Jun 2020] (PDF)
 
* USTR: REVIEW OF ACTION; Enforcement of U.S. World Trade Organization Rights in Large Civil Aircraft Dispute [Pub. Date: 26 Jun 2020] (PDF)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a26. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a3
7. DHS/CBP: “Updated Duty Deferral Create/Update”

(Source:
DHS/CBP)
, 24
Jun 2020)
 
  The Duty Deferral Create/Update CATAIR has been updated for the following items.
 
Adjusted to support duty deferral for both NAFTA and USMCA.
Updated Table 2 – Trade Agreement / Special Program Claim Codes to reflect the NAFTA and USMCA SPI codes (S, S+, CA, MX)

Updated Table 3 – Accounting Class Codes to reflect accounting class code 105 description of Softwood Lumber.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a5
9. Treasury/OFAC: “Update to OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) and Blocked Persons”

(Source:
Treasury/OFAC, 24 Jun 2020)

   The SDN list has recently been updated. Please visit
this page to access the latest version of the SDN list. Check this page periodically as it may also be updated if a new list-related format or product is offered.
 

  
For more information on today’s action, please visit this page.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a6
10. EU Council: “Declaration on the Alignment οf Certain Third Countries Concerning Restrictive Measures Against Syria”

 
   On 28 May 2020, the Council adopted Decision (CFSP) 2020/719 amending Council Decision 2013/255/CFSP.
   The Council Decision renewed the existing restrictive measures for a further twelve months, until 1 June 2021, and amended the list of persons and entities subject to restrictive measures as set out in the Annex I to Decision 2013/255/CFSP.
   The Candidate Countries Republic of North Macedonia, Serbia, Montenegro and Albania and the EFTA countries Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, members of the European Economic Area, as well as Ukraine, the Republic of Moldova and Georgia align themselves with this Council Decision.
They will ensure that their national policies conform to this Council Decision.

The European Union takes note of this commitment and welcomes it.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

(Source:
BBC News, 25 Jun 2020) [Excerpts]

 
   The US Defense Department has determined that 20 top Chinese firms, including Huawei, are either owned by or backed by the Chinese military.
The list, seen by US media, features video surveillance firm Hikvision, China Telecoms, China Mobile and AVIC.
  The determination could lay the groundwork for new US financial sanctions against the firms.
   It comes as the US has pressured other countries, including the UK, to bar Huawei for national security reasons.


   The BBC understands that the list has been published in order to inform congressional committees, US businesses, investors and other potential p


artners of Chinese firms about the role such firms may play in transferring sensitive technolog
y to the Chinese military. The list is also likely to grow. …

NWS_a212. WORLDecr: “BIS Implements Australia Group Changes”
 
 
 
 

(Source:
WORLDecr, 25 Jun 2020) [Excerpts]
 
   The US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (‘BIS’) has published a final rule amending the Export Administration Regulations (‘EAR’) to implement the decisions made at the February 2020 Australia Group Intersessional Implementation Meeting, and those subsequently adopted pursuant to the group’s procedures.
It published the following amendments:
  • ECCN 1C350 is amended by adding 24 precursor chemicals, as well as mixtures in which at least one of these chemicals constitutes 30 percent or more of the weight of the mixture, to ECCN 1C350.d.
  • ECCN 1C351 is amended to add Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS related coronavirus).
  • ECCN 2B352 is amended by adding a Technical Note to indicate that cultivation chamber holding devices controlled in 2B352.b.2.b include single-use cultivation chambers with rigid walls.
   The final rule was published in the Federal Register and became effective 17 June 2020.
   The Australia Group is a multilateral forum consisting of 42 participating countries and the European Union that maintain export controls on a list of chemicals, biological agents, and related equipment and technology that could be used in a chemical or biological weapons program.
   The Commerce Department said that the items addressed by this final rule were not previously listed on the CCL (Commerce Control List) or controlled multilaterally.

COM COMMENTARY

 
* Principal Author: Evan T. Abrams, 1-202-429-3052, Steptoe & Johnson LLP
 
   On June 18, 2020, the US Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)
 
announced
 
the addition of three individuals and eight entities to its list of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List), pursuant to Executive Order 13850, for “their activities in or associated with a network attempting to evade United States sanctions on Venezuela’s oil sector.”  OFAC also identified two vessels as blocked property belonging to the designated persons and issued a
 
general license
 
authorizing wind-down activities with certain of the designated persons, as well as an
 
FAQ
 
regarding the general license.  Finally, OFAC announced the delisting of two entities previously included on the SDN List for operating in the oil sector of the Venezuelan economy.
   The actions are the latest in a string of recent designations targeting entities involved in the Venezuelan oil sector, which has been a particular focus for OFAC of late.  The latest actions offer a number of insights for companies doing business with Venezuela and operating in the oil and shipping industries more broadly.  We highlight three key takeaways below.
 
   (
1) Designated Companies Sought to Structure their Dealings in a Sanctions Compliant Manner
   According to media
 
reports, Libre Abordo SA (Libre Abordo) and Schlager Business Group (Schlager), the two entities at the center of the alleged scheme, believed their dealings did not violate US sanctions and in fact made “legal revisions” to the oil-for-food agreement underpinning their dealings to “make sure it did not violate US sanctions.”  The companies reportedly believed their actions did not violate US sanctions because of an OFAC general license authorizing the supply of certain humanitarian goods to Venezuela, including food.  The fact that Libre Abordo and Schlager took a number of measures to promote compliance with US sanctions, but were ultimately designated, demonstrates the complexity of US sanctions and the importance of consulting with experienced counsel prior to engaging in conduct that may present sanctions risks.
 
  
(
2) OFAC Issues Rapid Delisting of Entities and Vessels
   In the same press release in which OFAC announced the new designations it also announced the delisting (removal from the SDN List) of two shipping companies and two vessels owned by those entities.  The entities were designated on June 2, 2020 for “operating in the oil sector of the Venezuelan economy.”  According to OFAC, “both companies have committed to enhanced risk-based sanctions compliance programs based on the model OFAC has recommended in its published guidance and pledged to cease involvement in the oil sector of the Venezuelan economy so long as the Maduro regime remains in power.”
   While OFAC has delisted a number of entities previously designated for operating in the Venezuelan oil sector, these delistings are notable for the rapid pace at which they occurred (just over two weeks from the entities’ initial designation).
  OFAC has repeatedly stated in the Venezuela context that “U.S. sanctions need not be permanent” and are “intended to bring about a positive change of behavior” and that “removal is available for individuals and entities … who, among other things, take concrete and meaningful actions to restore democratic order, refuse to take part in human rights abuses, speak out against abuses committed by the illegitimate Maduro regime, cease involvement in the oil, gold, financial, and defense and security sectors of the Venezuelan economy, or combat corruption in Venezuela.”  The applicable delisting policy differs under other sanctions programs.
   The very rapid two week delisting of these entities and vessels demonstrates the high priority that OFAC has placed on the delisting process in this instance, in the wake of
 
rumors and concerns
 
in the market about significant targeting of vessels that have served Venezuela and possible increases in global shipping rates.
 
  
(
3) OFAC Authorizes Certain Wind-down Activities for Maritime Shipping Companies
   In conjunction with the announced designations, OFAC published
 
General License 37
 
authorizing certain activities “ordinarily incident and necessary to the wind down of transactions” with two shipping companies and two vessels involved in the alleged scheme.  The license adds that “entry into any new commercial contracts” with the identified entities and vessels is not authorized under the license.
   Similarly, new FAQ 834 states that “Non-U.S. persons may wind down transactions with the persons or vessels listed in … GL 37 without exposure to sanctions under E.O. 13850, provided that such wind-down activity is consistent with GL 37.”  OFAC issued a similar FAQ in conjunction with
 
General License 36(authorizing certain wind-down activities involving Rosneft Trading S.A. and TNK Trading International S.A.), but has declined to issue a similar FAQ for certain other general licenses under the Venezuela Sanctions Program, creating some ambiguity for non-US persons considering the secondary sanctions risks in engaging in activity that may be covered by a general license.

COM_a214. ST&R Trade Report: “More China List 2, All Current China List 4A Tariff Exclusions Considered for Extension”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
* Contact: 
messages@strtrade.com, 1-305-894-1035
 
   An extension for up to 12 months of specific exclusions from the Section 301 additional tariff on List 2 goods from China as well as all current exclusions from the additional tariff on List 4A goods from China is under consideration by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Comments may be submitted between July 1 and July 30.
   List 2 goods have been subject to an additional 25 percent tariff since Aug. 23, 2018. The second set of exclusions (click here
 
for a list of covered products) from this tariff for List 2 goods was issued in September 2019 and is set to expire Sep. 20, 2020, while the third set of exclusions (click here
 
for a list of covered products) was issued in October 2019 and is slated to expire Oct. 2. 2020.
   Additionally, as of June 12, 2020 USTR had issued five notices granting exclusions from the additional 7.5 percent tariff on List 4A goods. These exclusions were issued March 10, March 17, March 31, May 13, and June 12, 2020, and are all set to expire Sept. 1, 2020.
   USTR is now considering a possible extension of these exclusions and will evaluate each on a case-by-case basis. The focus of this evaluation will be whether the product at issue remains available only from China.
   In requesting an extension of an exclusion, commenters should submit a comment form with the following information.
– full legal name of the organization making the comment, whether the commenter is a third party (e.g., law firm, trade association, or customs broker) submitting on behalf of an organization or industry, and (if so) the name of the third-party organization
– the number for the exclusion at issue, as provided in the annex of the applicable
 
Federal Register
 
notice
– whether the product is subject to an antidumping or countervailing duty order
– whether the commenter supports or opposes extending the exclusion and why
– whether the excluded product or comparable products are available from sources in the U.S. or third countries, and any changes in the global supply chain for the product since August 2018 (List 2 goods) or September 2019 (List 4A goods)
– efforts undertaken since August 2018 (List 2 goods) or September 2019 (List 4A goods) to source the product from the U.S. or third countries
– the value and quantity of the excluded product purchased in 2018 and 2019 and whether these purchases are from a related company (and, if so, its name and relationship to the requester)
– whether Chinese suppliers have lowered their prices for the excluded product following the imposition of tariffs
– the value and quantity of the excluded product purchased from domestic and third-country sources in 2018 and 2019
– the commenter’s gross revenue for 2018 and 2019
– whether the excluded product is sold as a final product or as an input
– whether the imposition of tariffs on the excluded product will result in severe economic harm to the commenter or other U.S. interests
– any additional information in support of the extension request


 
* Author:
 
George R. Tuttle III
, Esq., 1-415-254-5986,
 
Tuttle Law
 


  While we all have been adapting to the pandemic, changes in int
ernational trade continue. Below are a few snapshots of recent developments in the EU customs and trade arena. These have been busy times in this area!


 
  (1) Due diligence of the supply chain 
  In February 2020, the European Commission (the ‘Commission’) published a Study on due diligence requirements through the supply chain concerning compliance with human rights and environmental laws. The Commission department responsible for this initiative clarified at the end of May 2020 that, among the various options available, the Commission would favour the adoption of mandatory legislation on due diligence which would be applicable as early as 2021, and would be accompanied by a system of sanctions for failure to comply. The Commission has not yet put forward a proposal, but a public consultation should take place soon. This move by the Commission is part of the tendency in the European Union to adopt human rights and environmental protection standards which become applicable to any companies wishing to trade with the EU. Companies should inform themselves regarding this matter, start considering the necessary compliance measures and participate in the decision-making process over the coming months which ultimately will lead to the adoption of this new legislation. 
  (2) Brexit 
  The Brexit saga continues. The UK has recently announced that it will not be seeking an extension of the transitional period, scheduled to end on 31 December 2020, and that should a free trade agreement not be concluded with the European Union by the end of this year, the UK and the European Union will start trading under WTO terms. The adoption of a free trade agreement between the European Union and the UK by the end of the year is challenging, and even if such free trade agreement were to be concluded in time, customs formalities will still apply to goods traded between the European Union and the UK. 
  Unless an extension of the transitional period is agreed towards the end of this year, businesses should therefore be ready for the new scenario commencing on 1 January 2021, whereby the UK will be treated as any other third country when trading with the European Union insofar as customs formalities are concerned. In such a scenario, the UK authorities are planning to ease customs controls for goods entering the UK as of 1 January 2021, and for a transitional period of six months, but regular customs controls will eventually apply to goods that enter the UK from the European Union. Moreover, the European Union will apply regular customs controls as of the first day following the end of the transitional period on 31 December 2020. 
  (3) EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement 
  On 8 June 2020, Vietnam ratified the free trade agreement concluded with the European Union, which opens the door to its entry into force in the coming weeks or months – most likely before the end of the year. Companies planning to trade between the European Union and Vietnam should start preparations to benefit from the EU-Vietnam free trade agreement, which has been much anticipated by industry.   
  (4) Screening of foreign direct investment (FDI)
COVID-19 has raised concerns within the European Union and various EU Member States about the potential impact that foreign investment can have on strategic sectors. The legal framework for FDI is already adopted at the EU level – Regulation 2019/452 in force from 11 October 2020 – and in several EU Member States, but such controls have become particularly relevant lately, even more following calls from the European Commission at the beginning of the pandemic to increase controls in this area, which led EU Member states to strengthen their activity on FDI screening. Additional Guidance on FDI screening was also published by the Commission in mid-March. We continue to monitor legislative developments in this area in several EU Member states which have been particularly active on this matter over the recent months.
  (5) European Commission kicks off major EU trade policy review
  Finally, on 16 June 2020, the European Commission launched a major review of the EU’s trade policy, including a public consultation seeking input from the European Parliament, Member States, stakeholders, and civil society. The Commission’s objective is to build a consensus around a fresh medium-term direction for EU trade policy, responding to a variety of new global challenges and taking into account the lessons learned from the coronavirus crisis. Additional information on the initiative’s launch is available 
here
.
The public consultation, which is open until 15 September 2020, is based around certain themes and questions set out in this 
Note
. The themes concern: building more resilience – globally and inside the EU – through the so called “Open Strategic Economy”; supporting socio-economic recovery and growth; supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs); supporting the green transition and making trade more sustainable and responsible; supporting the digital transition and technological development; and ensuring fairness and a level playing field.


TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

 
* What: UK/EU Export Controls and Sanctions 101
* When: 30 Jun; 1:00 p.m. (EDT)
* Where: Webinar
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Training Institute (ECTI)
* ECTI Speaker: Richard Tauwhare
* Register: 
here 
or contact
Ashleigh Foor
, 1-540-433-3977

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a117. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)
  

*
Antoni Gaudi (Antoni Gaudí i Cornet; 25 Jun 1852 – 10 Jun 1926; was a Spanish architect known as the greatest exponent of Catalan Modernism. Gaudí’s works have a highly individualized, one-of-a-kind style. Most are located in Barcelona, including his main work, the church of the Sagrada Família.)
 – “There are no straight lines or sharp corners in nature. Therefore, buildings must have no straight lines or sharp corners.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.

 

5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499:

Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation. 
DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. 
DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.  
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)

: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense. 

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810.    23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359: comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.  

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 
DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War. 
14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 
6 May 2020: 85 FR 26847: Notice (not an amendment) temporarily reducing the registration fee schedule in ITAR 122.3 until April 30, 2021. 
 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

5 Jun 2020:
85 FR 84510:

Syria Sanctions Regulations. 

 
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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