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20-0521 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

20-0521 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

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Thursday, 21 May 2020

  1. Justice/ATF: Notice of Information Collection re National Firearms Act – Special Occupational Taxes – ATF Form 5630.7, ATF Form 5630.5R, and ATF Form 5630.5RC
  2. Justice/ATF: Notice of Information Collection re Firearms Manufactured or Imported – ATF Form 2 (5320.2) 
  3. Justice/ATF: Notice of Information Collection re Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Collectors of Firearms 
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. Commerce/Census: ” How to Find Your Schedule B Number Revisited”
  4. DHS/CBP: (No new postings)
  5. DOD/DSCA Policy Memos of Interest
  6. DoD/DCSA: “VROC Issues Supplemental Guidance on TS/SCI Eligibility Upgrade Requests in DISS”
  7. OMB/OIRA Reviews of Proposed Ex/Im Regulations
  8. State/DDTC: (No new postings)
  9. White House: (No New Ex/Im postings.)
  10. EU Council: “COVID-19 Transport Measures: Council Adopts Temporary Flexibility for Licences and Port Services”
  11. Hong Kong TID: Re-exports of U.S.-origin Electronics, Computers and Telecommunications from Hong Kong
  1. CNN: “Trump Confirms US is Withdrawing from Another Major Arms Treaty”:
  2. ST&R Trade Report: “Enforcement Relief, Expedited Actions Possible Under New Executive Order”
  1. Baker McKenzie: “US Extends Huawei TGL and Revises the EAR’s Foreign-Produced Direct Product Rule”
  2. Husch Blackwell: “BIS Extends Huawei TGL While Also Restricting Supply of Foreign-Produced Items to Huawei and Affiliated Entities”
  3. Kelley Drye: “COVID-19 Accountability Act – New Potential Sanctions on China”
  1. ECS Presents Webinar “ITAR/EAR Controls for Non-US Companies” on 24-25 Jun
  2. FCC Academy Presents June Webinars: “U.S. Export Controls: ITAR, EAR, and FMS”
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  4. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  5. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

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EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

(Source: Justice/ATF) [Excerpts]

 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice.
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for 60 days until July 20, 2020.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will submit the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed information collection (IC) is also being published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies.
* ABSTRACT: This information collection requires that all new business owners who are subject to the Special Occupational Taxes (SOT) under the National Firearms Act (NFA) complete the Special Tax Registration and Return National Firearms Act (NFA)-ATF Form 5630.7. Taxpayers will also receive prepopulated printed copies of both the NFA Special Tax Renewal Registration and Renewal-ATF Form 5630.5R and the NFA Special Tax Location Registration Listing-ATF Form5630.5RC, so they can validate/correct their information and remit the required payment for the applicable tax year. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Chancey, National Firearms Act Division, 244 Needy Road, Martinsburg, WV 25405; nfaombcomments@atf.gov; 304-616-4500. …

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

EXIM_a22. Justice/ATF: Notice of Information Collection re Firearms Manufactured or Imported – ATF Form 2 (5320.2)  

(Source: Justice/ATF) [Excerpts]
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice.
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for an additional 30 days until June 22, 2020.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will submit the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995.
* ABSTRACT: The Notice of Firearms Manufactured or Imported-ATF Form 2 (5320.2) is required of (1) a person who is qualified to manufacture National Firearms Act (NFA) firearms, or (2) a person who is qualified to import NFA firearms to register manufactured or imported NFA firearm(s).
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Comments should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain. Find this information collection by selecting

Currently under 30-day Review

Open for Public Comments.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

EXIM_a33. Justice/ATF: Notice of Information Collection re Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Collectors of Firearms

(Source: Justice/ATF)
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will submit the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995.
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for an additional 30 days until June 22, 2020.
* ABSTRACT: The recordkeeping requirement for this collection is primarily to facilitate ATF’s authority to inquire into the disposition of any firearm during the course of a criminal investigation.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Comments should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain. Find this information collection by selecting

Currently under 30-day Review

Open for Public Comments.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

* Treasury/OFAC: Rules; Zimbabwe Sanctions. Scheduled Pub. Date: 05/22/2020; [
PDF]

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source:
BIS)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a36. Commerce/Census:” How to Find Your Schedule B Number Revisited”

(Source:
Global Reach Blog)  
 
What are Schedule B numbers, and how can you find the right one for your export? Schedule B numbers are 10-digit classification codes that exporters use to classify their products and keep track of U.S. export data at USA Trade® Online.
 
You may have come across our blog from December 2017 that provides general directions on how to use the U.S. Census Bureau’s Schedule B search engine to find the right Schedule B number for your export. In this blog, we provide a refresher course and additional tips to make the task even easier.
 
The first step: Visit <census.gov/scheduleb> to access the Census Bureau Schedule B search engine and browse the entire Schedule B. (You can also identify obsolete Schedule B numbers.)
 
To use the search engine, click on the “Search” link. Once directed to the search engine, it will prompt you to enter your product description in the search bar. If you hover your cursor over the “i” icon beside “DESCRIBE YOUR PRODUCT,” you will see other tips to help with your search. [Deleted graphic.]
 
As the pop-up window says, you can search for your Schedule B number using descriptive words (like “frozen”), a complete or partial Harmonized System (HS) code (such as the first four or six digits of your classification code, if you know them), or a Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) number if you are exporting a chemical substance. The search engine also recognizes some brand names. In the past, you may have searched for generic terms like “cell phone” instead of specific brands or model names. The good news: The “intelligent” search engine has learned from numerous previous searches, so you can now search for many popular brand-based products. Of course, it is not familiar with all brands – at least not yet. If it does not know your product by brand name, it will ask guiding questions or you may need to start again using keywords. . . .

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a47. DHS/CBP: (No new postings.)
(Source:
DHS/CBP)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Source:
DoD/DSCA)
 
* DSCA Policy Memo 20-30, Revision Security Assistance Management Manual (SAMM) Section C11.3.6. “Joint Visual Inspection of Excess Defense Articles” has been posted.
   Effective immediately, this memorandum revises the Security Assistance Management Manual (SAMM) process for Joint Visual Inspection of Excess Defense Articles in Chapter 11 Special Programs and Services. Allowing inspection of an excess item in advance of the authorized transfer provides prospective partners and the cognizant Implementing Agency with useful information when deciding how to proceed with a possible transfer. This memo updates C11.3.6. Joint Visual Inspection (JVI) of EDA.
 
* DSCA Policy Memo 20-34, Assignment of Program Code “EB” to track Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) Funding Provided for Assistance to Europe, Eurasia, and Central Asia (AEECA) has been posted.
   Effective immediately program code “EB” is assigned to track FY 2018 OCO funds provided for Assistance to Europe, Eurasia, and Central Asia (AEECA). Funds were provided by Division K, of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 (P.L . 115-141) and were obligated via transfer from the Department of State to the Defense Security Cooperation Agency via signature of a Memorandum of Agreement pursuant to section 632(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 , as amended, on September 30. 2019. Funds are available for reprogramming and expenditure until September 30, 2023. …

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a69. DoD/DCSA: “VROC Issues Supplemental Guidance on TS/SCI Eligibility Upgrade Requests in DISS”

(Source: 
DoD/DCSA
) [Excerpts]
 
The Vetting Risk Operations Center provides Industry with supplementary guidance related to the recent posting, “Operational Change to Adjudicating Tier 3 and Tier 5 Investigations” on April 30, 2020. The guidance does not intend to replace or supersede existing procedures, but rather to clarify Industry specific Defense Information System for Security (DISS) guidance related to the TS/SCI eligibility upgrade requests. Click the headline to see the guidance.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a710. OMB/OIRA Reviews of Proposed Ex/Im Regulations

(Source:
OMB/OIRA
)
 
* Agency: DOC-BIS (RIN: 0694-AH77)
* Title: Wassenaar Arrangement 2018 Plenary Agreements Implementation; and Other Revisions Related to National
* Status: Pending Review
* Received: 05/20/2020
* Deadline: None

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a811. State/DDTC: (No new postings)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a912. White House: (No New Ex/Im postings.)

(Source: The White House) 

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a1013. EU Council: “COVID-19 Transport Measures: Council Adopts Temporary Flexibility for Licences and Port Services”

(Source:
Council of the European Union) [Excerpts]
 
The EU is adapting certain rules for different transport sectors to help companies and authorities cope in the extraordinary circumstances created by the coronavirus crisis.
 
Today, the Council adopted temporary measures enabling the extension of the validity of certain certificates and licences in road, rail and waterborne transport, and relaxing the rules on charging ships for the use of port infrastructures.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a1114. Hong Kong TID: Re-exports of U.S.-origin Electronics, Computers and Telecommunications from Hong Kong

 
  1. This circular informs traders of the elimination of U.S. Licence Exception Civil End Users (“Licence Exception CIV”) which will affect the exports, re-exports and transfers of certain U.S.-origin electronics, computers and telecommunications products starting from 29 June 2020.
     
  2. On 28 April 2020, the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) of the U.S. Department of Commerce published a final rule (referred as “the rule” hereafter) announcing the elimination of Licence Exception CIV. The rule can be found at the following web link.
     
  3. With effect from 29 June 2020, US export authorisation, which is usually in the form of an individual validated licence issued by the BIS, will be required for exporting/ re-exporting/transferring items previously covered by Licence Exception CIV to countries/ places in Group D:1 Note. The items affected include, for example, electronics, computers and telecommunications products under Export Control Classification Numbers (“ECCN”) 3A001.a.3, 3A001.a.7, 3A001.a.11, 4A003.g, 5A001 and their sub-categories.
     
  4. There is no change to Hong Kong’s import and export licensing control on strategic commodities as required under the Import and Export Ordinance (Chapter 60 of the Laws of Hong Kong) and the Import and Export (Strategic Commodities) Regulations (Chapter 60G of the Laws of Hong Kong).
     
  5. To facilitate Trade and Industry Department (“TID”)’s consideration of strategic commodity licence applications, applicants are often required to provide additional supporting documents which include but not limited to valid export authorisations issued by the products’ originating countries/places. In light of the rule, traders importing/exporting the US-origin products concerned are advised to liaise and check with their U.S. exporters/manufacturers, particularly to obtain the necessary and applicable US export authorisation.
     
  6. In this connection, strategic commodity licences previously issued by TID featuring “U.S. Licence Exception CIV” under the “Export Authorisation of Foreign Exporting/Product’s Originating Country (Place)” should no longer be used after 29 June 2020. TID will liaise with the licensees concerned to revise the licences’ validity period and/or cancel the unused licences.
Enquiry: Contact Miss Cas Lam at telephone number 2398 5575 or by email at stc@tid.gov.hk.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

(Source:
CNN Politics, 21 May 2020) [Excerpts]
 
President Donald Trump confirmed the US will be exiting the Open Skies Treaty, a pact designed to reduce the risk of military miscalculations that could lead to war, and said Russia’s actions had prompted him to take the decision.
 
“Russia didn’t adhere to the treaty, so until they adhere, we will pull out,” Trump told reporters outside the White House Thursday. The President predicted that the US withdrawal would force Moscow back to the table. “There’s a chance we may make a new agreement or do something to put that agreement back together,” Trump said. “I think what’s going to happen is we’re going to pull out and they’re going to come back and want to make a deal.” …
 
The 1992 treaty allows member countries to conduct short-notice, unarmed, reconnaissance flights over the other countries to collect data on their military forces and activities. It is the latest major arms control treaty that the US will abandon under the Trump administration. …

(Source: Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report) [Excerpts]

 

* Primary author: Gilbert Lee Sandler, Esq., 305.267.5155; sandler@strtrade.com;
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A. 

 
Importers, exporters, and others have a new avenue for seeking relief from pending and future federal enforcement actions under an executive order signed May 19 by President Trump as part of an expanding effort to restore U.S. economic health in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. This EO may also open the way to expedited actions by federal agencies with trade oversight responsibilities. Companies with pending trade actions before the government should consider the new possibilities in addressing both individual cases and more general concerns over regulatory reform with the appropriate customs, import, or export agencies.
 
Regarding enforcement actions, the EO directs federal agencies to recognize businesses’ regulatory compliance efforts and commit to fairness in administrative enforcement and adjudication. This applies to investigations as well as assertions of statutory or regulatory violations.
 
More specifically, the order directs agencies to revise their enforcement and adjudication procedures and practices in light of a number of specified principles, including the following.
  • subjects of enforcement actions should not bear the burden of proving compliance, and agencies should provide them with favorable relevant evidence in their possession
  • liability should be imposed only for violations of laws or duly issued regulations after notice and opportunity to respond
  • enforcement should be prompt, fair, and free of unfair surprise
  • penalties should be proportionate, transparent, and imposed in adherence to consistent standards and only as authorized by law
  • temporary enforcement discretion or extensions of time for compliance may be considered
 
More broadly in regard to regulatory and other requirements, the EO directs federal agencies to temporarily or permanently rescind, modify, waive, or provide exemptions from regulations and other requirements that may inhibit economic recovery. This direction could enable agencies to act more quickly on a wide range of trade-related measures, from tariff exemption and refund requests to applications for drawback and foreign-trade zone actions. However, agencies will have to take into account the concerns listed above as well as factors such as public health and safety, national and homeland security, and budgetary priorities and operational feasibility.

COM COMMENTARY

COM_a117. Baker McKenzie: “US Extends Huawei TGL and Revises the EAR’s Foreign-Produced Direct Product Rule”
(Source: 
Baker McKenzie Blog, 19 May 2020)
 
* Principal Author: Nicholas F. Coward, Esq., 1-202-452-7021, Baker McKenzie LLP
 
On May 15, the US Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) issued an interim final rule amending the Export Administration Regulations’ (“EAR”) General Prohibition Three (the “foreign-produced direct product rule”) and Entity List to impose new controls on the reexport, export from abroad, and transfer (in-country) of certain foreign-produced semiconductor-related items when such items are the direct product of certain designated US technology or software and are destined to Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. and 114 of its non-US affiliates designated on the BIS Entity List (collectively, “Huawei”). BIS is seeking comments on the interim final rule, which must be submitted on or before July 14, 2020.

Concurrently, effective May 15, BIS issued a final rule extending through August 13, 2020 the validity of the Temporary General License (“TGL”) authorizing certain transactions involving the export, reexport, and transfer of items subject to the EAR to Huawei. BIS noted in the final rule that it is in the process of reviewing submissions received in response to its request for comments on future extensions of the TGL, which may be submitted until April 22, 2020. Please see our prior blog posts on the initial designation of Huawei and sixty-eight of its non-US affiliates to the Entity List on May 16, 2019 here; on the issuance of the original TGL on May 20, 2019 here; on the designation of forty-six additional non-US affiliates of Huawei to the Entity List and on the TGL updates issued on August 19, 2019 here; on BIS’s publication of Huawei-related FAQs on September 9, 2019 here; on BIS’s previous extensions of the TGL here and here; and on BIS’s request for comments on future extensions here and here.
 
The Expanded Foreign-Produced Direct Product Rule in General Prohibition Three

The final rule expands General Prohibition Three’s existing controls on foreign-produced items that are the direct products of certain designated US technology or software by adding a new control in § 736.2(b)(3)(vi). This new control prohibits the reexport, export from abroad, or transfer (in-country) of 
(1)
 
certain foreign-produced items controlled under the new footnote 1 to the Entity List 
(2)
 
when there is “knowledge” (as defined in the EAR) that the foreign produced item is destined for an entity on the Entity List with a footnote 1 designation. Currently, the footnote 1 designation has been added to the Entity List entries for Huawei and its listed affiliates only.

The new footnote 1 to the Entity List imposes a licensing requirement for the reexport, export from abroad, or transfer (in-country) by any person of foreign-produced items destined for a footnote 1 Entity List party when the foreign-produced item is either:

 

(1) The direct product of designated “technology” or “software” (as defined in the EAR) subject to the EAR, i.e., the foreign-produced item is both:

  • produced or developed by an entity with a footnote 1 designation on the Entity list, and
  • a direct product of designated “technology” or “software” that is “subject to the EAR” (note that such a direct product can include designated technology that is itself newly subject to the EAR through the new control, such as a design developed by an entity with a footnote 1 designation from designated technology or software that is subject to the EAR); or

(2) The direct product of a plant or major component of a plant, i.e., the foreign-produced item is both:

  • produced by a plant or major component of a plant that is itself a direct product of designated U.S.-origin “technology” or “software”, and
  • a direct product of “technology” or “software” produced or developed by an entity with a footnote 1 designation on the Entity list, regardless of whether such “technology” or “software” is itself subject to the EAR.
The interim rule clarifies that a “major component of a plant located outside the United States” means “equipment that is essential to the ‘production’ of an item to meet the specifications of any design produced or developed by the designated entities, including testing equipment.” 

Designated “technology” and “software” is the “technology” or “software” specified in Export Control Classification Numbers (“ECCN”) 3E001, 3E002, 3E003, 4E001, 5E001, 3D001, 4D001, or 5D001; “technology” specified in ECCN 3E991, 4E992, 4E993, or 5E991; or “software” specified in ECCN 3D991, 4D993, 4D994, or 5D991. In other words, this targeted expansion of the rule applies not only to “technology” or “software” controlled for National Security (NS) reasons, but also to “technology” or “software” controlled under the designated Anti-Terrorism (AT) ECCNs. 

The new control captures, for example, a foreign-produced integrated circuit that is produced by a third party pursuant to designs developed by Huawei using designated technology or software, such as Electronic Design Automation software, subject to the EAR. One important effect of the new control may be its application to items produced by foreign companies outside the United States using equipment subject to the EAR pursuant to designs developed by Huawei. For example, as noted by BIS in the Federal Register Notice, integrated circuits produced in a foundry outside the United States through the use of equipment, which is subject to the EAR and essential to the production of the integrated circuit, will be subject to the new control if the design of the integrated circuit is produced or developed from Huawei “technology” or “software.” In that scenario, there is no additional requirement that the Huawei-developed technology or software must be subject to the EAR.  As such, the new control will likely have a significant impact on US semiconductor equipment manufacturers as well as their foreign semiconductor manufacturer customers.
 
Savings Clause 

The interim final rule provides that foreign-produced items, which are the direct products of designated “technology” or “software” subject to the EAR (i.e., items falling within the scope of the first category of covered items above), that were in transit on May 15, 2020 pursuant to actual orders for exports from abroad, reexports, or transfers (in-country) to a foreign destination or to the consignee/end-user, may proceed to that destination under the previous license exception eligibility or without a license.

In addition, the interim final rule provides that foreign-produced items in production prior to May 15, 2020, which are the direct products of a plant or major component of a plant (i.e., items falling within the scope of the second category of covered items above), are not subject to the new control and may proceed as not being subject to the EAR, if applicable, or under the previous license exception eligibility or without a license, so long as they are exported from abroad, reexported, or transferred (in-country) by midnight on September 14, 2020. BIS described this savings clause as a measure intended to prevent adverse economic impacts on foreign foundries utilizing US semiconductor manufacturing equipment that may have initiated production for items based on Huawei design specifications as of May 15, 2020.

The Response from China

The Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China (“MOFCOM”) raised objection to the new BIS rule targeted at Huawei in a media interview on May 17, 2020. Huawei also made an announcement on the next day and mentioned that it expected to work with customers and suppliers to reduce the adverse impact brought by this “discriminatory” rule. Some Chinese news media commented that the Chinese government was ready to put US companies on an “unreliable entities list,” as part of countermeasures in response to the new limits on Huawei.  …  

COM_a319. Kelley Drye: “COVID-19 Accountability Act – New Potential Sanctions on China”
(Source: Kelley Drye, 18 May 2020)

 
* Principal Author: Eric McClafferty, 1-212-808-7759, Kelley Drye & Warren LLP 
 
Earlier this week, the
 
COVID-19 Accountability Act
 
was introduced in the Senate and the House by Rep. Senator Lindsey Graham and Rep. Doug Collins respectively.  While the text of the draft legislation is not yet available, a summary indicates that it would require within sixty days that the President certify to Congress that China has:
“Provided a full and complete accounting to any COVID-19 investigation led by the United States, its allies, or United Nations affiliates, such as the World Health Organization (WHO);
  • Closed all wet markets that have the potential to expose humans to health risks; and
  • Released all pro-democracy advocates in Hong Kong that were arrested in the post COVID-19 crackdowns.”
If there is no such certification, the Act would then authorize the President to impose at least two of a variety of sanctions to hold China accountable, including travel bans, visa revocations, asset freezes, restricting U.S. financial institutions from loaning money to Chinese businesses, and barring Chinese firms from being listed on American stock exchanges.  Such sanction would be effective until the certification could be made.
The legislation has additional requirements, most notably for exporters requires Buy America for procurements related to the Strategic National Stockpile with standard waiver authority for the Health and Human Services Secretary.

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

 
*When: 24-25 Jun
*Where:
Online
*Sponsor: Export Compliance Solutions & Consulting
*Presenter: Suzanne Palmer, Mal Zerden
*Register 

here
 or by calling 866-238-4018 or email

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

*
Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744; is regarded as one of the greatest English poets. He is best known for his satirical and discursive poetry, including
 
The Rape of the Lock, The Dunciad, and
 
An Essay on Criticism, as well as for his translation of Homer. After Shakespeare, Pope is the second-most quoted writer in the English language.  Some of his verses have even become popular idioms in common parlance (e.g., “damning with faint praise”). He is considered a master of the heroic couplet.)
  – “The ruling passion, be it what it will. The ruling passion conquers reason still.”
  – “True wit is nature to advantage dressed; what oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed.”

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.
 
 
 
5 Apr 2019: 84 FR 13499: Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation.

DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774.

19 May 2020:
85 FR 29849
: Amendments to General Prohibition Three (Foreign-Produced Direct Product Rule) and the Entity List.

  

DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   Last Amendment: 24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.

DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM): DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense.

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810. 

23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359, comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 

DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War.

14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 
6 May 2020: 85 FR 26847, Notice (not an amendment) temporarily reducing the registration fee schedule in ITAR 122.3 until April 30, 2021. 

 

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

10 Apr 2020:
85 FR 20158:

North Korea Sanctions Regulations. 

 
 
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.
 

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PermanentJobListView All Events

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