;

20-0511 Monday “Daily Bugle”

20-0511 Monday “Daily Bugle”

 this copy of the Daily Bugle to others or share 
this subscription link
Monday, 11 May 2020

  1. Justice/ATF Announces Information Collection under Annual Firearms Manufacturing and Exportation Report Under 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, Firearms-ATF Form 5300.11 
  2. Justice/ATF Announces Information Collection for Licensed Explosives Importers, Manufacturers, Dealers, and Permittees 
  3. Treasury/OFAC Updates OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List 
  1. Items Scheduled for Future Federal Register Edition
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings)
  3. State/DDTC: (No new postings)
  1. AP: “US Investigating Ex-Green Beret for Venezuela Raid”
  1. EU Sanctions: “US House of Representatives Letter in Support of UN Iran Arms Embargo”
  2. Hogan Lovells: “Developments in Advanced Reactor Licensing and Nuclear Export Controls”
  3. Steptoe: “Department of Commerce Initiates National Security Investigation into Transformer Components”
  4. Thompson & Assoc: “Export Controls and Exceptions on Personal Protection Equipment”
  1. Monday List of Ex/Im Job Openings: 139 Jobs Available – 11 New Job Listings This Week 
  1. ECTI Presents: Hitting the Mark – Classification under the Harmonized System & Schedule B Code Webinar: 14 May
  2. FCC Academy Presents Webinar: “An Introduction to EU/Dutch Dual-use and Military Export Controls”; 12 May
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Find the Latest Amendments Here. 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 
  4. Submit Your Job Opening and View All Job Openings 
  5. Submit Your Event and View All Approaching Events 

Are You Keeping Up to Date with the Latest Regulations?
 

Bartlett’s Annotated ITAR and Bartlett’s Annotated FTR are Word documents to down-

load to your laptop to keep you updated on the latest amendments, and contain over 800 footnotes of section history, key cases, practice tips & tricks, and extensive Tables of Contents.
The ITAR amendments to the ITAR that took effect on 9 March and 25 March are included in the current edition of the BITAR.  Subscribers receive updated editions every time the regulations are amended (usually within 24 hours) so you will always have the current versions of the regulations. Subscribe to the BITAR now to guarantee you have an up-to-date ITAR!    
 

Combo
BITAR + BAFTR
Price: $300
Offer: $275

 
Buy Here

BITAR

Price: $200

BAFTR

  Price: $100

EXIM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 27763: 60-Day Notice
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice
* ACTION: 60-Day notice.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will submit the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed information collection (IC) is also being published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies.
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for 60 days until July 10, 2020.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have additional comments, regarding the estimated public burden or associated response time, suggestions, or need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions, or additional information, please contact: Tracey Robertson, ATF Federal Firearms Licensing Center either by mail at 244 Needy Road, Martinsburg, WV 25405, by email at Tracey.Robertson@atf.gov, or by telephone at 304-616-4647.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

EXIM_a22. Justice/ATF Announces Information Collection for Licensed Explosives Importers, Manufacturers, Dealers, and Permittees

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 27763: 60-Day Notice
 
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice
* ACTION: 60-Day notice.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will submit the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed information collection (IC) is also being published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies.
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for 60 days until July 10, 2020.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have additional comments, regarding the estimated public burden or associated response time, suggestions, or need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions, or additional information, please contact: Anita Scheddel, Program Analyst, Firearms and Explosives Industry Division, Explosives Industry Programs Branch, Mailstop 6N-518, either by mail at 99 New York Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20226, or by email at eipbinformationcollection@atf.gov, or by telephone at (202) 648-7120.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

EXIM_a33. Treasury/OFAC Updates OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List

(Source: Federal Register) [Excerpts]
 
85 FR 27805: Notice
 
* AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury.
* ACTION: Notice.
* SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of one or more persons that have been placed on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List based on OFAC’s determination that one or more applicable legal criteria were satisfied. All property and interests in property subject to U.S. jurisdiction of these persons are blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with them.
* DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for effective date(s).
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
OFAC: Associate Director for Global Targeting, tel.: 202-622-2420; Assistant Director for Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, tel.: 202-622-2490; Assistant Director for Licensing, tel.: 202-622-2480; Assistant Director for Regulatory Affairs, tel.: 202-622-4855.

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

[No relevant items for today.]

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

(Source: Commerce/BIS)

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OGS_a3
6. S
tate/DDTC: (No new postings)

(Source: State/DDTC)   

 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

COM NEWS

NWS_a17. AP: “US Investigating Ex-Green Beret for Venezuela Raid”

(Source: Anchorage Daily News, 7 May 2020) [Excerpts]
 
A former Green Beret who has claimed responsibility for an ill-fated military incursion into Venezuela is under federal investigation for arms trafficking, according to current and former U.S. law enforcement officials.
   The investigation into Jordan Goudreau is in its initial stages and it’s unclear if it will result in charges, according to a U.S. law enforcement official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations. The probe stems from a frenzy of contradictory comments Goudreau has made since a small cadre of volunteer combatants he was advising on Sunday launched an impossible raid aimed at overthrowing Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro.
   Members of the U.S. Congress are also asking the State Department about its knowledge of Goudreau’s plans and raised concerns that he possibly violated arms trafficking rules.
  An AP investigation published before the failed raid places Goudreau at the center of a plot hatched with a rebellious former Venezuelan Army General Cliver Alcalá, to secretly train dozens of Venezuelan military deserters in secret camps in Colombia to carry out a swift operation against Maduro. …  
   The men were being readied for combat at three rudimentary camps in Colombia with the help of Goudreau and his Florida-based company, Silvercorp USA, multiple Maduro opponents and aspiring freedom fighters told the AP. But the plot seemed doomed from the start because it lacked the support of the Trump administration and was infiltrated by Maduro’s vast, Cuban-trained intelligence network, the AP found.
   The law enforcement official said Goudreau’s comments suggests his work on behalf of the volunteer army may have violated laws that require any U.S. company supplying weapons or military equipment, as well as military training and advice, to foreign persons to seek State Department approval.
   Experts agree. “Goudreau’s public comments alone show he was exporting his lethal expertise into a foreign country,” said Sean McFate, a former U.S. Army paratrooper who worked as a private military contractor and is the author of a book, “The New Rules of War,” on the foreign policy implications of privatized warfare. “This is a serious violation.” … 


   Officials in U.S. Congress are expressing concern. Democratic congressional staff contacted the State Department multiple times on Monday seeking information about any possible contacts with Goudreau or knowledge of his activities, and whether his work may have violated International Traffic in Arms Regulations, according to a staffer on the condition of anonymity to discuss the private outreach.


   The stockpile, worth around $150,000, included spotting scopes, night vision goggles, two-way radios and 26 American-made assault rifles with the serial numbers rubbed off. Fifteen brown-colored helmets seized by police were manufactured by High-End Defense Solutions, a Miami-based military equipment vendor owned by a Venezuelan immigrant family, according to Colombian police. High-End Defense Solutions is the same company that Goudreau visited in November and December, allegedly to source weapons, according to two former Venezuelan soldiers who claim to have helped the American select the gear but later had a bitter falling out with Goudreau amid accusations they were moles for Maduro. …


   Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday reiterated President Donald Trump’s claims a day earlier that there was no direct U.S. government involvement in Goudreau’s brazen operation. “If we’d have been involved, it would have gone differently,” he joked. “As for who bankrolled it, we’re not prepared to share any more information about what we know took place. We’ll unpack that at an appropriate time, we’ll share that information if it makes good sense.”


A person familiar with the situation said the agreement was signed by Rendon and another U.S.-based aide to Guaidó, lawmaker Sergio Vergara, in October. Guaidó at one point briefly greeted Goudreau via video conference – as evidenced by an audio recording made on a hidden cellphone by Goudreau and which he shared with the Venezuelan journalist. …


   Goudreau, a three-time Bronze Star recipient, has insisted that his work provided only strategic advice to the combatants doesn’t require special licensing. Still, he acknowledged sending into battle two special forces buddies associated with Silvercorp and who are now in Venezuelan custody.
“You’ve got to introduce a catalyst,” he said in a phone interview with the AP Monday from Florida. “By no means am I saying that 60 guys can come in and topple a regime. I’m saying 60 guys can go in and inspire the military and police to flip and join in the liberation of their country, which deep down is what they want.”
   Goudreau has said he was hired by Juan Guaidó, who the U.S. considers Venezuela’s rightful leader. To back his claim, he’s produced an 8-page agreement he signed with what appears to be the signature of Guaidó. The opposition leader has refused to say whether the signature on the “general services agreement” is authentic. … 


   A few days later, the team cut off contact with Goudreau, realizing he was unable to deliver what he had promised and because they were not getting along, the person said. An attempt to reactivate the accord fell through in November because the opposition had abandoned support for a private military incursion, the person said. The last contact with Goudreau was a few weeks ago when a lawyer on the veteran’s behalf wrote Rendon seeking to collect a promised $1.5 million retainer. Goudreau, through intermediaries, made it known that if they didn’t pay up he would release the agreement to the press, the person said.


   It’s unclear how the weapons were smuggled into Colombia. But Silvercorp in December bought a 41-foot fiberglass boat, Florida vessel registration records show, and proceeded in February to obtain a license to install maritime navigation equipment. On his application to the Federal Communications Commission, he said the boat would travel to foreign ports.
   The boat next appeared in Jamaica, where Goudreau had gathered with a few of his special forces buddies looking to participate in the raid, according to a person familiar with the situation on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive dealings. But as they were readying their assault, the boat broke down at sea on March 28 and an emergency position-indicating radio beacon was activated, alerting naval authorities on the island of Curacao. Goudreau had to return to Florida, prevented from rejoining his troops prior to the landing because of travel restrictions put in place due to the coronavirus pandemic. …

COM COMMENTARY

(Source:
EU Sanctions,
11 May 2020)
 
* Author: Michael O’Kane, Esq., 44-20-7822-7777, Peters & Peters
 
We reported on 29 April 2020 that the Secretary of State Michael Pompeo had circulated a draft resolution calling for the renewal of the UN arms embargo against Iran, imposed under UNSC Resolution 2231, (see post). 387 out of 435 members of the House of Representatives have now written to the Secretary of State to encourage increased diplomatic efforts to ensure the arms embargo, due to expire in October 2020, and UN travel ban on Iranian officials imposed in response to proliferation activities remain in force. The letter says that the ban’s expiration may lead to increased purchases and sales of weapons to and from Iran, and that the UN embargo is necessary for concerned states which may not feel they have “sufficient legal authority to stop transfers once the embargo expires”. Press release here.

COM_a2 9. Hogan Lovells: “Developments in Advanced Reactor Licensing and Nuclear Export Controls” 

(Source:
Hogan Lovells,
6 May 2020) [Excerpts] 
 
* Principal Author: Amy C. Roma, Esq., 1-202-637-6831, Hogan Lovells
 
Over the past month, there have been major developments related to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) advanced reactor licensing reform and nuclear-related export controls.
 
Kicking Off New Advanced Reactor Rulemaking
 
On April 13 the NRC staff published a paper (SECY-20-0032) seeking Commission approval for a rulemaking approach that would create a voluntary framework for advanced reactor licensing applications. This comes in response to a directive from the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act (NEIMA) that tasked the NRC with designing a new regulatory regime to support the development of advanced nuclear reactors by the end of 2027. For more information on NEIMA, please visit our previous blog post.
 
The NRC staff proposal would create a new Part 53 to the NRC regulations, with a focus on making a technology-inclusive and risk-informed regulatory framework that applicants could voluntarily utilize-in lieu of other regulatory frameworks-for licensing advanced reactor concepts. According to the NRC staff, the proposal aims to be flexible enough to support licensing efforts for a wide variety of potential advanced reactor technologies, including fusion reactors.
 
The staff’s approach seeks to:
   (1) Continue to provide reasonable assurance of adequate protection of public health and safety and the common defense and security;
   (2) Promote regulatory stability, predictability, and clarity;
   (3) Reduce requests for exemptions from the current requirements in 10 CFR Part 50 and 10 CFR Part 52;
   (4) Establish new requirements to address non-light-water reactor technologies;
   (5) Recognize technological advancements in reactor design; and
   (6) Credit the response of advanced nuclear reactors to postulated accidents, including slower transient response times and relatively small and slow release of fission products.
 
Export Control Restrictions
 
On April 28 the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) within the Department of Commerce published two final rules and one proposed rule that amend the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to more tightly regulate certain transactions involving China, Russia, and Venezuela, among others.
 
One of the final rules (85 Fed. Reg. 23459) adds subcategories of nuclear-related materials processing items to the list of items subject to the military end use or end user requirements of 15 CFR § 744.21 (Supplement 2 to Part 744). These subcategories include:
   (i) Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 2A290: Generators and other equipment ”specially designed,” prepared, or intended for use with nuclear plants.
   (ii) ECCN 2A291: Equipment, except items controlled by 2A290, related to nuclear material handling and processing and to nuclear reactors, and “parts,” “components” and “accessories” therefor.
 
Certain technologies related to the above-listed equipment may be similarly restricted. Under § 744.21(a), there is a general prohibition on export, re-export, or in-country transfer involving China, Russia, or Venezuela, of the above equipment or any other item listed in Supplement 2 to Part 744 (which can include technology or data), if:
  – The sender has knowledge that the item is intended at least in part for a military end use in China, Russia, or Venezuela, or for a military end user in Russia or Venezuela, or
  – BIS informs the sender (through individual notice or notice through publication in the Federal Register) that the item is or may be intended for a military end use in China, Russia, or Venezuela, or for a military end user in Russia or Venezuela … 

(Source: Thompson & Associates, 5 May 2020)
 
* Principal Author: George W. Thompson, Esq., 1-202-772-2039, Thompson & Associates, PLLC 
 
Around the same time the Food and Drug Administration was loosening import requirements for such Personal Protection Equipment as masks and respirators, the Federal Emergency Management Agency imposed export restrictions on many of the same items. FEMA’s Temporary Final Rule limits exports of N95 filtering facepiece respirators, other filtering facepiece respirators, elastomeric, air-purifying respirators and appropriate particulate filters/cartridges, PPE surgical masks, and PPE gloves or surgical gloves. Face masks and bandanas are not included. The rule is effective through August 10, 2020.
 
PPE Subject to Detention
   Exports of these items are not prohibited. Instead, they are subject to detention by Customs and Border Protection. FEMA will determine “whether it is necessary or appropriate to promote the national defense to purchase” goods in detained shipments or allocate them for domestic use.
The factors it will consider include:
   (1) The need to ensure that scarce or threatened items are appropriately allocated for domestic use;
   (2) minimization of disruption to the supply chain, both domestically and abroad;
   (3) the circumstances surrounding the distribution of the materials and potential hoarding or price-gouging concerns;
   (4) the quantity and quality of the materials;
   (5) humanitarian considerations; and
   (6) international relations and diplomatic considerations.
 
Exceptions Are Available
    FEMA’s rule exempts “shipments made by or on behalf of U.S. manufacturers with continuous export agreements with customers in other countries since at least January 1, 2020, so long as at least 80 percent of such manufacturer’s domestic production of covered materials, on a per item basis, was distributed in the United States in the preceding 12 months.
   CBP has announced a number of additional exceptions, under which qualifying products “may proceed immediately for export as scheduled.” These include shipments to United States commonwealths and territories, certain exports by non-profit and non-governmental organizations, intra-company transfers, items for assembly into medical and testing kits for return to the United States, and shipments to Canada and Mexico that are not intended for transshipment to other destinations.
   Several of these exceptions require the exporter to submit a “letter of attestation” describing the claimed exemption and provides sufficient detail for CBP and FEMA to confirm the exception applies. The letter also should include a “statement that the provided information is true and accurate to the best of the exporter’s knowledge, and that the exporter is aware that false information is subject to prosecution under the” Defense Procurement Act.
  In my experience, the more information provided in the letter regarding the product and other transaction details, the better. CBP, in some ports at least, may be taking an overly broad interpretation of the products covered by FEMA’s order. A detailed explanation of the products and their qualification for immediate export can help avoid delays.
  The letter of attestation should be uploaded in the Automated Export System, preferably in conjunction with the Electronic Export Information’s filing. This poses a practical problem for those exports to Canada exempted from EEI filing pursuant to 15 C.F.R. 30.36. CBP offers the following options for them: voluntarily submit an EEI, give CBP a letter for a detained shipment, or provide one to the carrier in case CBP demands it. I prefer the third approach, as it avoids the cost of an EEI and the delays inherent in a detention, even one resolved quickly.

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

(Source: Events & Jobs Editor)
 

* ABB; Raleigh, NC;
Import/Export Shipping Specialist 
* Ajilon; Princeton, NJ;
Production Manager 


* Excelitas Technologies; Boulder, CO;
Inventory Control Coordinator II 
* L3Harris Technologies; Arlington CA;
Counsel, Trade Attorney
; Requisition ID: CHQ20202804-44921
* LAM Research; Livermore , CA;
Manager, International Trade Operations 
* Masimo; Irvine, CA;
Trade Compliance Specialist 
* Mitshubishi; Lake Mary, FL;
Corporate Compliance Manager 
*
Northrop Grumman Corporation
; Redondo Beach, CA;
Staff Int’l Trade Compliance Analyst
; Requisition ID: 20013219; Contact Details
angela.bernier@ngc.com 
* Smiths Interconnect; Boston, MA;
Trade Compliance Lead 


* Splunk; San Francisco, CA;
Director, Compliance 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TE EX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

 
* What: Hitting the Mark – Classification under the Harmonized System & Schedule B Code
* When: Thursday, 14 May, 2020; 1:00 p.m. (EDT)
* Where: Webinar
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Training Institute (ECTI)
* ECTI Speaker: Melissa Proctor
* Register: here or contact Ashleigh Foor, 1-540-433-3977.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TE_a3
14.
FCC Academy Presents Webinar: “An Introduction to EU/Dutch Dual-use and Military Export Controls”; 12 May

(Source: FCC Academy)
 
* What: Introduction to EU / Dutch Dual-Use and Military Export Controls
* When: Tuesday, 12 May 2020 (tomorrow) 
* Where: Online
* Sponsor: FCC Academy
* Presenter: Marco F.N. Crombach MSc (Director)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN EDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a115. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)
 

* Karl Barth
(10 May 1886 – 10 Dec 1968; was a Swiss Reformed theologian who is most well known for his landmark commentary The Epistle to the Romans, his Barmen Declaration, and especially his unfinished five volume, The Church Dogmatics. Barth’s influence expanded well beyond the academic realm to mainstream culture, leading him to be featured on the cover of Time on 20 April 1962, and Pope Pius XII’s statement that Barth was “the greatest theologian since Thomas Aquinas.”)
– “Laughter is the closest thing to the grace of God.”
 
* Isaac D’Israeli
(11 May 1766 – 19 Jan 1848; was a British writer, scholar, and man of letters. He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.)
– “Enthusiasm is that secret and harmonious spirit which hovers over the production of genius.”
– “Quotations, like much better things, has its abuses.”
 
Monday is Pun Day:
* A Mexican magician told his audience he was going to vanish on the count of three. He counted, “Uno, dos…” and disappeared without a tres.
* You can’t run through a camp site. You can only ran because it’s past tents.
* Why did the old man fall down the well? Because he couldn’t see that well.
* How do you think the unthinkable? With an ithberg.
* If someone says he is cold, tell him to stand in a corner. It’s 90 degrees there.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments are listed below.
 
Agency 
Regulations 
Latest Update 
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.
 
 
 
5 Apr 2019:84 FR 13499: Civil Monetary Penalty Adjustments for Inflation.

DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774.

28 Apr 2020:
85 FR 23470
: Elimination of License Exception Civil End Users (CIV).
 

 

DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR): 15 CFR Part 30.   Last Amendment: 24 Apr 2018: 83 FR 17749: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates.

DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM): DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense.

18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary here.)  
DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES: 10 CFR Part 810. 

23 Feb 2015: 80 FR 9359, comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. 
DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; 10 CFR Part 110.

15 Nov 2017, 82 FR 52823: miscellaneous corrections include correcting references, an address and a misspelling.

 

DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War.

14 Mar 2019: 84 FR 9239: Bump-Stock-Type Devices.

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. 
6 May 2020: 85 FR 26847,  Temporarily reducing the registration fee schedule in ITAR 122.3 until April 30, 2021. 

 

 
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR): 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

10 Apr 2020:
85 FR 20158:

North Korea Sanctions Regulations. 

 
 
 
 
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA), Revision 8.

1 Jan 2019: 19 USC 1202 Annex.
  – HTS codes for AES are available here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available here.
 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
The Daily Bugle Archive

Are you searching for updates from the past editions of the Daily Bugle? 

We publish a list of over 100 trade compliance job openings every day.

Submit your job for free.
PermanentJobListView All Job Openings

Are you looking for a new job in trade compliance?
Click here to see the current job openings.

We publish a list of over 100 trade compliance events every day. Submit your event for free.

PermanentJobListView All Events

Are you looking for an upcoming event?   
Click here to see upcoming events.

Scroll to Top