;

19-0111 Friday “Daily Bugle”

19-0111 Friday “Daily Bugle”

Friday, 11 January 2019

TOPThe Daily Bugle is a free daily newsletter from Full Circle Compliance, containing changes to export/import regulations (ATF, DOE/NRC, Customs, NISPOM, EAR, FACR/OFAC, FAR/DFARS, FTR/AES, HTSUS, and ITAR), plus news and events. Subscribe here for free subscription. Contact us for advertising inquiries and rates
.

[No items of interest noted today.] 

  1. Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions 
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings.)
  3. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)
  4. Germany/BAFA Posts January 2019 Newsletter
  1. Expeditors News: “Singapore Customs Begins Charges for NTP Accounts in January”
  2. ST&R Trade Report: “Trade Processing Continues but Other CBP Functions Curtailed as Shutdown Continues”
  1. D. Salkeld: “What the Government Shutdown Means for Imports”
  2. R. Whitten & L. Mays: “Viewpoint: U.S. to Streamline Small Arms, Ammo Export Regulations”
  1. List of Approaching Events: 82 Events Posted This Week, Including 16 New Events
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Latest Amendments: DHS/Customs (18 Dec 2018), DOC/EAR (20 Dec 2018), DOC/FTR (24 Apr 2018), DOD/NISPOM (18 May 2016), DOE/AFAEC (23 Feb 2015), DOE/EINEM (20 Nov 2018), DOJ/ATF (26 Dec 2018), DOS/ITAR (4 Oct 2018), DOT/FACR/OFAC (15 Nov 2018), HTSUS (19 Dec 2018)  
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 

EXIMITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

EXIM_a1

 
[No items of interest noted today.]

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGSOTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

OGS_a11
. Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
 

(Source:
Federal Register)
 

* U.S. Customs and Border Protection; RULES; [Publication Date: 14 January 2019.]:

  – Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Certain Archaeological and Ecclesiastical Ethnological Material from Bulgaria
  – Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Certain Archaeological Material from China  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGS_a22
Commerce/BIS: (No new postings.)

(Source: 
Commerce/BIS)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGS_a03
3. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)
(Source: State/DDTC)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGS_a04
4. Germany/BAFA Posts January 2019 Newsletter
(Source: German BAFA, 10 Jan 2019.)
 
The German Bundesamt für Wirtschaft und Ausfuhrkontrolle (“BAFA”) has posted its January 2019 newsletter on its website. The newsletter (in German) can be found
here.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

NWSNEWS

(Source:
Expeditors News, 10 Jan 2019.)
 
Beginning on January 1, 2019, Singapore customs began charging for Networked Trade Platform (NTP) accounts and Value-Added Service (VAS) providers and introduced NTP-Lite Accounts.
 
NTP accounts will include full access to VAS and Singapore government e-services, with some additional advantages over NTP-Lite accounts, while NTP-Lite accounts will have a $0 monthly charge.
 
Singapore customs also provides a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for the NTP-Lite accounts including:
 
  – Government VAS at no charge;
  – Government e-Services that can be applied for;
  – How to switch to the standard NTP account.
 
For selected permits, Singapore Customs will require the supporting documentation to be submitted via NTP beginning February 1, 2019.
 
The Singapore Government notices may be found
here and
here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection is prioritizing the movement of cargo during the ongoing federal government shutdown, but a number of its other trade-related functions have been put on hold. The following information on the current status of these services has been provided by CBP officials and members of the trade community.
 
  – Most cargo processing operations are being maintained. Traders experiencing cargo delays should contact the applicable port of entry or Center of Excellence and Expertise.
  – CBP employees still working include CEE directors and assistant directors, entry specialists, import specialists, some information technology staff (though not ABI representatives), and Fines, Penalties, and Forfeitures staff.
  – National account managers have been furloughed.
  – Entry liquidations are still being done, though without refunds where applicable, and the Automated Clearinghouse is fully functional for duty payments.
  – CBP has halted work on rulings (though the eRulings portal is still accepting requests), regulatory audits, and refunds (e.g., drawback, protests, post-summary corrections, though interest will eventually be paid where applicable).
  – CBP is still enforcing deadlines for the trade community (e.g., protest and drawback claims, CF 28/29 responses, Enforce and Protect Act duty evasion proceedings, audits) but its own responses may not be held to normal timelines.
  – The Environmental Protection Agency is largely shut down but CBP has a protocol for handling critical EPA-regulated cargo release issues through port of entry or CEE officials.
  – Food and Drug Administration trade functions such as prior notice processing are continuing to operate.
  – HTSUS records were updated prior to the winter holiday and are mostly current for 2019 but do not reflect any developments since the shutdown began. Customs brokers have access to most 2019 duty rates through their ABI systems but the online searchable, PDF, and paper versions of the HTSUS made available by the International Trade Commission will not be available until after ITC staff return to duty.
  – Problems related to changes in the HTSUS for reporting units of measure cannot be resolved at this time because both CBP and ITC staff who handle this issue are furloughed.
  – CBP is not capable of processing the Section 301 tariff exclusions recently approved by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative or addressing additional exclusion requests and will issue further instructions after the shutdown ends.
  – There have been no major issues with the opening or processing of quotas, some of which (e.g., steel) are already closed.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

COMMCOMMENTARY

(Source:
Arent Fox LLP, 2 Jan 2019.)
 
* Author: David Salkeld, Esq., Arent Fox LLP,
david.salkeld@arentfox.com, +1 202-857-6478.
 
The US Government has been under a partial shutdown since December 21, 2018, and it is anyone’s guess when the shutdown will end. Congress has recessed until this week, and there is little word of progress among the parties.
 
We have compiled a brief summary regarding what US Customs and Border Protection and other government agencies involved in import operations will likely do during a shutdown. We understand that CBP will issue guidance shortly. While CBP could always modify its processes, this information, which is similar to what occurred during the federal government shutdown in 2013, can be useful as a planning tool for importers until further guidance is issued.
 
Impacted Government Agencies: A government shutdown affects more than just CBP import operations. Other agencies – such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the United States Department of Agriculture, etc. – also have their import monitoring or import documentation processing operations affected. In fact, a shutdown of these activities could lead to cargo processing delays, as these agencies have “release and hold” authority over shipments independent of CBP. CBP may use its discretion to process some cargo in the interim.
 
Cargo Clearance/Port Activity: Overall, cargo clearance operations is continuing. CBP officers and agriculture specialists continue to show up to work, but will not be paid during the shutdown. However, how port activities would function is a matter for individual ports. Importers should contact their brokers and forwarders for questions specific to a particular port.
 
Security Screening: Since cargo clearance continues, entry review screening for cargo security and screening for illegal imports also continues. Import specialists and entry specialists continue to work and review entries, without pay.
 
  – Foreign Trade Zones: Foreign Trade Zone operations continue.
  – Centers for Excellence and Expertise: CEEs continue to operate, but national account managers are furloughed.
  – CBP Headquarters/Regional Offices: Employees not directly related to processing cargo (mainly at CBP HQ and regional offices) are furloughed. As a result, some “non-essential” trade activity have stopped (e.g., issuing broker licenses, Jones Act exemptions and reviewing and issuing rulings).
  – C-TPAT: C-TPAT security validation visits/processing are not occurring during a shutdown. C-TPAT members should contact C-TPAT if there are upcoming deadlines for clarification on the impact of the partial shutdown.
  – ACE: ACE developments can continue for a few weeks based on existing funds, but no ACE training/tech support would be available during the shutdown.
  – Filing/Decision Deadlines: Deadlines for rulings and other decisions would also be affected. Many decisions would only be published and available after the shutdown ended.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

COMM_a2
8
. R. Whitten & L. Mays: “Viewpoint: U.S. to Streamline Small Arms, Ammo Export Regulations”

(Source:
National Defense Magazine, 9 Jan 2019.)
 
* Authors: Reid Whitten, Esq.,
rwhitten@sheppardmullin.com, +44 203-178-7831; and Lisa Mays,
lmays@sheppardmullin.com, +1 202-747-2307. Both of Sheppard Mullin.
 
U.S. regulations are being rewritten to remove certain guns and ammunition from defense export controls. A plan has been proposed within the State Department to migrate articles on the first three categories of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations U.S. Munitions List to the less restrictive Department of Commerce’s Export Administration Regulations in Spring 2019. The change is expected to become effective by Summer.
 
Whether the State Department will go so far as to rename the United States Munitions List, the “United States List” remains to be seen. The removal of certain guns and ammunition from the munitions list will be a big change for small arms manufacturers who will soon be able to sell to a number of countries with a lower licensing requirement.
 
The proposed amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or ITAR, first appeared in notes on the Defense Trade Advisory Group meeting on Sept. 8, 2017. For those who don’t live and breathe the trade regulations, this is the State Department’s working group that provides the bureau of political-military affairs with a formal channel to consult the private sector on all things concerning munitions exports.
 
On May 14, 2018, the Department of Commerce’s bureau of industry and security, in conjunction with the State Department’s directorate of defense trade controls, published proposed rules regarding the amendment.
 
Under the proposed rules, certain articles under USML Categories I (firearms, close assault weapons and combat shotguns), II (guns and armament), and III (ammunition/ordnance) will be moved from the USML to the Export Administration Regulations’ commerce control list. Those articles are mainly commercial and not military items. The proposed rule acknowledges that there is a significant worldwide market for firearms in connection with civil and recreational activities such as hunting, marksmanship, competitive shooting and other non-military activities; and that the proposed changes burden U.S. industry without any proportionate benefits to national security or foreign policy objectives.
 
American gun and ammunition manufacturers will have an increased capacity to reach a larger customer base without as many restrictions on the export of their products. U.S. firearm manufacturers and exporters will likely see a reduction in export compliance administrative burden. Arms sales from the United States will likely grow, and the nation will likely continue to hold and expand its share of the international small arms market.
 
As just one example of the reduced regulatory burden, firearm, ammunition and ordnance manufacturers would likely not have to register as ITAR manufacturers or exporters. That registration requires yearly renewal and the base cost of registration is more than $2,000. Thereafter, those exporters would not need to apply for ITAR export licenses, which are generally more difficult to obtain than EAR licenses, in order to sell their products to foreign countries.
 
The change in control does not equate to a free-for-all. The proposed rule creates 17 new export control classification numbers under the commerce control list to control the items moved from the munitions list, and the rule further revises several other numbers. In addition, certain Category II items will migrate to the “600 series” of the commerce control list. Those 600-series items generally require licenses for exports or reexports, except when the item is exported or reexported to Canada or, when operating under license exception, any of the countries party to the Strategic Trade Authorization.
 
Where a license is required, exporters will still need to apply for a license through the Simplified Network Application Process Redesign (SNAP-R) maintained by Commerce’s bureau of industry and security. Customs will also continue to require exporters to file an electronic export information submission. Moreover, exporters will need to continue to control certain information related to the design, development, manufacture, operation and repair of articles still controlled under the State Department’s trade regulation.
 
State Department and Department of Commerce parallel rules to implement the removal of firearms from the munitions list are in the proposed stage. The final regulations may be published around April. Those regulations will likely have a delayed effect with an effective date set in the months following the publication of the final regulations.
 
As ever, a company’s approach to compliance will depend on its risk tolerance. In preparation for the finalized regulations, affected companies may choose to analyze their compliance controls and create logistics plans for exporting Category I, II, or III items under the new regulations.
 
It may be useful to examine current company procedures and operations to anticipate how to adjust business operations to adapt to the changes. Planning ahead may help companies realize compliance efficiencies and reduce administrative costs. It is important to note, however, that the U.S. firearms industry will remain regulated under the National Firearms Act, Gun Control Act, and other federal and state firearms laws.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TEEX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

TE_a39. 
List of Approaching Events: 82 Events Posted This Week, Including 16 New Events
(Sources: Editor and Event Sponsors)

Published every Friday or last publication day of the week, o
ur overview of Approaching Events is organized to list c
ontinuously available training, training events, s
eminars & conferences, and 
webinars. 
 
Please, submit your event announcement to Alexander Witt, Events & Jobs Editor (email: 
awitt@fullcirclecompliance.eu
), composed in the below format:
 
# DATE: LOCATION; “EVENT TITLE”; EVENT SPONSOR; WEBLINK; CONTACT DETAILS (email and/or phone number)
 

#” = New or updated listing  

 
Continuously Available Training
 
* E-Seminars: “US Export Controls” / “Defense Trade Controls“; Export Compliance Training Institute; danielle@learnexportcompliance.com 

* Webinar: ”
Company-Wide US Export Controls Awareness Program“; Export Compliance Training Institute;
danielle@learnexportcompliance.com 

* E-Seminars: “ITAR/EAR Awareness“; Export Compliance Solutions;
spalmer@exportcompliancesolutions.com
* Online: “Simplified Network Application Process Redesign (SNAP-R)“; Commerce/BIS; 202-482-2227
* E-Seminars: “Webinars On-Demand Library“; Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A.
* Online: “International Trade Webinars“; Global Training Center
*
 
Online: “On-Demand Webinars“; “General Training“; Center for Development of Security Excellence; Defense Security Service (DSS)
* Online: “ACE Reports Training and User Guide“; DHS/CBP

* Online: ”
Increase Your International Sales – Webinar Archive“; U.S. Commercial Service

* Web Form: “Compliance Snapshot Assessment“; Commonwealth Trading Partners (CTP)
* Online: “
Customs Broker Exam Prep Course
“; The Exam Center
 
 
Seminars and Conferences

 
 
 



Jan 15: Arlington, VA; “
Voluntary Disclosure/Voluntary Self-Disclosure Seminar
“; SIA

*
Jan 21-24; San Diego, CA; “ITAR Defense Trade Controls / EAR Export Controls Seminar“; ECTI; 540-433-3977

#
Jan 24; Irving, TX; “
Trade Tariffs on China Roundtable Discussion
“; Torres Law & CSCPM

* Jan 28-Apr 8: Wilmington, CA; “
Customs Brokers License Exam Course
;” FTA

#
Jan 29; New York, NY; “
Trade and Customs Update
“; KPMG LLP


Jan 29: Rotterdam, The Netherlands; “
Awareness training Export Control, Dual-use en Sancties
“; FENEX

* Jan 29-30: Toronto, ON; “U.S. Export & Re-Export Compliance for Canadian Operations;” The Canadian Institute

* Jan 30-31, 2019: Pittsburgh, PA; “
Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

* Jan 30-31: Washington, DC; “
5th National Forum on CFIUS
;” American Conference Institute (ACI)
*
 
Feb 5; Bruchem, the Netherlands; “
Designing an Internal Compliance Program for Export Controls & Sanctions
“; Full Circle Compliance 

* Feb 6-7: Scottsdale, AZ;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS
*
 
Feb 6-7: Washington , D.C.; “International Technology Transfers, Cloud Computing & Deemed Export Compliance“; American Conference Institute

* Feb 11-12: Orlando, FL; “
Boot Camp: Achieving ITAR/EAR Compliance
“; Export Compliance Solutions (ECS)

* Feb 12-13: Washington, D.C.; “
2019 Legislative Summit
“; National Association of Foreign Trade Zones (NAFTZ)
 

* Feb 13: Southampton; “
UK Export Control Awareness Breakfast
“; Hampshire Chamber of Commerce, ECJU, and Trethowans LLP

* Feb 18-21: Orlando, FL; “
ITAR Defense Trade Controls / EAR Export Controls Seminar
“; ECTI

#
Feb 20-22: Houston, TX; “
Advanced Topics in Customs Compliance 2019 Conference
“; Braumiller;
#
Feb 26-27; Chicago, IL; “
CTPAT Training
“; SCS America

* Feb 26-27: Miami, FL; “
Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS


Mar 4-6: Savannah, GA; “
2019 Winter Back to Basics Conference
“; SIA

* Mar 5-6: San Diego, CA; “
Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

*
Mar 5-7:  Orlando, FL; “
‘Partnering for Compliance’ Export/Import Control Training and Education Program
“; Partnering for Compliance

* Mar 6-7: San Diego, CA;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

*
 Mar 9: Orlando, FL; “
Customs/Import Boot Camp
;” Partnering for Compliance

* Mar 12-14: Dallas, TX;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS
* Mar 12-14: Dallas, TX;

How to Build an Export Compliance Program
“; Commerce/BIS

* Mar 18-21: Las Vegas, NV; “
ITAR Defense Trade Controls / EAR Export Controls Seminar
“; ECTI

* Mar 26-27: Scottsdale, AZ; “
Managing ITAR/EAR Complexities
“; Export Compliance Solutions
 

* Mar 27-28: San Francisco, CA; “Global Encryption, Cloud & Cyber Trade Controls;” American Conference Institute

* Apr 1-4: Washington, DC;ITAR Defense Trade Controls / EAR Export Controls Seminar“; ECTI

* Apr 3-4: Denver, CO;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

#
Apr 4-5; Miami, FL; “
CTPAT Training
“; SCS America

*
 
Apr 9: Bruchem, The Netherlands; “Awareness Course U.S. Export Controls: ITAR & EAR from a Non-U.S. Perspective“; Full Circle Compliance
* Apr 23-24: Portsmouth, NH;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS
Apr 25: Portsmouth, NH;

Technology Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

*
 Apr 30-May 1: Nashville, TN: “Mastering ITAR/EAR Challenges“; Export Compliance Solutions (ECS);

* May 2-3: Washington DC; “Economic Sanctions Enforcement and Compliance;” American Conference Institute

* May 5-7: Savannah, GA; “2019 Spring Seminar“; National Association of Foreign Trade Zones (NAFTZ)

May 6-7: Atlanta, GA; “
2019 Spring Conference
“; SIA
*
 
May 7: Bruchem, The Netherlands; “An Introduction to EU / Dutch Dual-Use and Military Export Controls“; Full Circle Compliance

* Jun 5-6: Seattle, WA; “
Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

*
 
Jun 10: Cleveland, OH; “
Letters of Credit
“; Global Training Center
*
 
Jun 11: Cleveland, OH; “
Export Doc & Proc
“; Global Training Center
*
 
Jun 12: Cleveland, OH; “
Tariff Classificatio
n“; Global Training Center
*
 
Jun 13: Cleveland, OH; “
NAFTA Rules of Origin
“; Global Training Center
*
 
Jun 14: Cleveland, OH; “
Incoterms® 2010 Rules
“; Global Training 
* Jun 17-20: San Diego, CA; “ITAR Defense Trade Controls / EAR Export Controls“; ECTI

Jul 8 – 10: National Harbour, MD; “
2019 Summer Back to Basics Conference
“; SIA

*
Jul 10-11: Seattle, WA: “Boot Camp: Achieving ITAR/EAR Compliance“; Export Compliance Solutions (ECS);

* Aug 20-21: Cincinnati, OH;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“; Commerce/BIS

* Aug 20-21: Milpitas, CA;

Complying with U.S. Export Controls
“;
Commerce/BIS
* Aug 22: Milpitas, CA:

Encryption Controls
“;
Commerce/BIS

* Sep 8-11: Chicago, IL; “2019 Annual Conference and Exposition“; National Association of Foreign Trade Zones (NAFTZ)

#
Sep 16-19: Austin, TX; “
ITAR Controls / EAR & OFAC Export Controls (Sep 18-19) Seminar Series
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977


Sep 17-19: Annapolis, MD; “
The ECS 2nd Annual ITAR/EAR Symposium
“; ECS

#
Sep 30 – Oct 3; Amsterdam, NL; “
ITAR Controls / EAR/OFAC Commercial and Military Controls
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977

*
 
Oct 1: Bruchem, The Netherlands; “The Export Administration Regulations (EAR) from a non-U.S. Perspective“; Full Circle Compliance

#
Oct 14-17; Columbus, OH; “
University Export Controls Seminar
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977


Oct 28-29: Washington D.C.; “
2019 Fall Advanced Conference
“; SIA

#
Oct 28-31; Phoenix, AZ; “
ITAR Controls / EAR & OFAC Export Controls Seminar Series
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977
#
Nov 11-14; Washington, DC; “
ITAR Controls / EAR & OFAC Export Controls Seminar Series
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977

*
 
Nov 26: Bruchem, The Netherlands; “The International Traffic in Arms Regulations (EAR) from a non-U.S. Perspective“; Full Circle Compliance
* Dec 4-5: New York, NY; “10th Annual New York Forum on Economic Sanctions;” American Conference Institute

#
Dec 9-12; Miami, FL; “
ITAR Controls / EAR & OFAC Export Controls Seminar Series
“; ECTI
; 540-433-3977

 

 
Webinars 


 

#
Jan 15: Webinar: “
Navigating the TFTEA Drawback Regulations
;” KPMG LLP
#
Jan 15: Webinar: “
2018 OFAC Sanctions Enforcement and Compliance Trends
;” Volkov Law

* Jan 16: Webinar: “Expanding the Scope of AD/CV Duty Orders: Are Your Goods Affected?;” Sandler Travis & Rosenberg, P.A.

* 
Jan 16: Webinar: “Supply Chain Symposium 2019: Mandatory FAR Flow-Down Clauses and Best Practices“; Public Contracting Institute

* Jan 17: Webinar: “Sanctions & Export Controls for Non-U.S. Companies“; Akin Group

#
Jan 17: Webinar: “Your New Year’s Resolution: Get Your CBP Compliance Program in Shape;” Global Trade Academy

* Jan 22: Webinar: “Trade in Turmoil [Monthly Update];” Sandler Travis & Rosenberg, P.A.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

ENEDITOR’S NOTES

EN_a110
. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations

(Source: Editor)

* Alexander Hamilton (11 Jan 1755 or 1757 – 12 Jul 1804; was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation’s financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of George Washington’s administration.)
  – “It’s not tyranny we desire; it’s a just, limited, federal government.”
  – “Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike.”
 
* Edmund Burke (12 Jan 1729 – 9 Jul 1797; was an Irish statesman, as well as an author, orator, political theorist and philosopher, who served as a member of parliament and in the House of Commons.  Burke was a proponent of underpinning virtues with manners in society and of the importance of religious institutions for the moral stability and good of the state.  These views were expressed in his treatise, A Vindication of Natural Society. Burke was praised by both conservatives and liberals, and in the 20th century he became regarded as the philosophical founder of modern conservatism.)
  – “All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”
  – “He who struggles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.”
 
Friday funnies: 
 
* I don’t like people who use big words just to make themselves look perspicacious.
 
* A police recruit was asked during the exam, “What would you do if you had to arrest your own mother?” He said, “Call for backup.”
 
* I opened a new restaurant called Karma. There’s no menu, we just give you what you deserve.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN_a211. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date?
(Source: Editor)

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments to applicable regulations are listed below.
 

*
DHS CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199.  Implemented by Dep’t of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs & Border Protection.
  – Last Amendment: 18 Dec 2018: 
83 FR 64942-65067
: Modernized Drawback  
 

DOC EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR)
: 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774. Implemented by Dep’t of Commerce, Bureau of Industry & Security.
  – Last Amendment: 20 Dec 2018: 
83 FR 65292-65294
: Control of Military Electronic Equipment and Other Items the President Determines No Longer Warrant Control Under the United States Munitions List (USML); Correction [Concerning ECCN 7A005 and ECCN 7A105.]
 
*
DOC FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR)
: 15 CFR Part 30.  Implemented by Dep’t of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau.
  – Last Amendment: 24 Apr 2018: 
83 FR 17749-17751
: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here
.
  – The latest edition (1 Jan 2019) of Bartlett’s Annotated FTR (“BAFTR”), by James E. Bartlett III, is available for downloading in Word format. The BAFTR contains all FTR amendments, FTR Letters and Notices, a large Index, and approximately 250 footnotes containing case annotations, practice tips, Census/AES guidance, and explanations of the numerous errors contained in the official text. Subscribers receive revised copies in Microsoft Word every time the FTR is amended. The BAFTR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance 
website
.  BITAR subscribers are entitled to a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BAFTR. Government employees (including military) and employees of universities are eligible for a 50% discount on both publications at 
www.FullCircleCompiance.eu
.  
 

DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM)
: DoD 5220.22-M. Implemented by Dep’t of Defense.
  – Last Amendment: 18 May 2016: 

Change 2
: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary 
here
.) 
 

DOE ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES
: 10 CFR Part 810; Implemented by Dep’t of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.
  – Last Amendment: 23 Feb 2015:

80 FR 9359
, comprehensive updating of regulations, updates the activities and technologies subject to specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. This rule also identifies destinations with respect to which most assistance would be generally authorized and destinations that would require a specific authorization by the Secretary of Energy.
 

DOE EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL
; 10 CFR Part 110; Implemented by Dep’t of Energy, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.
  – Last Amendment: 20 Nov 2018, 10 CFR 110.6, Re-transfers.
 

DOJ ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS
: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War.  Implemented by Dep’t of Justice, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives.
  – Last Amendment: 26 Dec 2018: 
83 FR 66514-66554
: Bump-Stock-Type Devices
 

DOS INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR)
: 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130. Implemented by Dep’t of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.
  – Last Amendment: 4 Oct 2018:
83 FR 50003-50007
: Regulatory Reform Revisions to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations.
  – The only available fully updated copy (latest edition: 1 Jan 2019) of the ITAR with all amendments is contained in Bartlett’s Annotated ITAR (“BITAR”), by James E. Bartlett III. The BITAR contains all ITAR amendments to date, plus a large Index, over 800 footnotes containing amendment histories, case annotations, practice tips, DDTC guidance, and explanations of errors in the official ITAR text. Subscribers receive updated copies of the BITAR in Word by email, usually revised within 24 hours after every ITAR amendment. The BITAR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance 
website
. BAFTR subscribers receive a $25 discount on subscriptions to the BITAR, please
contact us
to receive your discount code.
 
*
DOT FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR)
: 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders. 
Implemented by Dep’t of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control.
  – Last Amendment: 15 Nov 2018: 
83 FR 57308-57318
: Democratic Republic of the Congo Sanctions Regulations
  
*
USITC HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA)
, 1 Jan 2018: 19 USC 1202 Annex. Implemented by U.S. International Trade Commission. (“HTS” and “HTSA” are often seen as abbreviations for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated, shortened versions of “HTSUSA”.)
  – Last Amendment: 19 Dec 2018: 
Harmonized System Update (HSU) 1820
, containing 19,061 ABI records and 3,393 harmonized tariff records.
  – HTS codes for AES are available 
here
.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available 
here
.

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EN_a312
. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories
(Source: Editor)
 

Review last week’s top Ex/Im stories in “Weekly Highlights of Daily Bugle Top Stories” posted here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* The Ex/Im Daily Update is a publication of FCC Advisory B.V., compiled by: Editor, James E. Bartlett III; Assistant Editors, Alexander P. Bosch and Vincent J.A. Goossen; and Events & Jobs Editor, Alex Witt. The Ex/Im Daily Update is emailed every business day to approximately 6,500 readers of changes to defense and high-tech trade laws and regulations. We check the following sources daily: Federal Register, Congressional Record, Commerce/AES, Commerce/BIS, DHS/CBP, DOE/NRC, DOJ/ATF, DoD/DSS, DoD/DTSA, FAR/DFARS, State/DDTC, Treasury/OFAC, White House, and similar websites of Australia, Canada, U.K., and other countries and international organizations.  Due to space limitations, we do not post Arms Sales notifications, Denied Party listings, or Customs AD/CVD items.

* RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS: This email contains no proprietary, classified, or export-controlled information. All items are obtained from public sources or are published with permission of private contributors, and may be freely circulated without further permission, provided attribution is given to “The Export/Import Daily Bugle of (date)”. Any further use of contributors’ material, however, must comply with applicable copyright laws.  If you would to submit material for inclusion in the The Export/Import Daily Update (“Daily Bugle”), please find instructions here.

* CAVEAT: The contents cannot be relied upon as legal or expert advice.  Consult your own legal counsel or compliance specialists before taking actions based upon news items or opinions from this or other unofficial sources.  If any U.S. federal tax issue is discussed in this communication, it was not intended or written by the author or sender for tax or legal advice, and cannot be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing, or recommending to another party any transaction or tax-related matter.

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