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18-0605 Tuesday “Daily Bugle”

18-0605 Tuesday “Daily Bugle”

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

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The Daily Bugle is a free daily newsletter from Full Circle Compliance, containing changes to export/import regulations (ATF, DOE/NRC, Customs, NISPOM, EAR, FACR/OFAC, FAR/DFARS, FTR/AES, HTSUS, and ITAR), plus news and events.  Subscribe 
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  1. Commerce/BIS Seeks Comments on Licensing Responsibilities and Enforcement 
  2. Commerce/BIS Seeks Comments on Request for the Appointment of a Technical Advisory Committee 
  3. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 1303, Ship’s Store Declaration 
  4. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Licensed Firearms Manufacturers Records of Production, Disposition, and Supporting Data 
  5. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Registered Importers of Arms, Ammunition & Implements of War on the USMIL 
  6. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Form 5300.5, Report of Firearms Transactions–Demand 2 
  7. President Adjusts Imports of Aluminum into the United States 
  8. President Adjusts Imports of Steel into the United States 
  1. Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings.)
  3. DHS/CBP Posts Notice on Section 232 Steel and Aluminum Absolute Quotas, Effective 1 Jun
  4. Justice: “Florida Man Sentenced to 26 Months in Prison for Conspiring to Illegally Export Defense Articles to Russia”
  5. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)
  6. Treasury/OFAC Posts Ukraine-/Russia-related General License 16
  1. DW: “Former U.S. Intelligence Officer Arrested in Seattle on China Spying Charges”
  2. Expeditors News: “Mexico will Impose Equivalent Measures in Response to U.S. Section 232 Tariffs in Steel and Aluminum” 
  3. The Jerusalem Post: “Intel Report: Iran Seeks Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology in Germany” 
  4. Reuters: “Exclusive: U.S. May Soon Claim Up to $1.7 billion Penalty from China’s ZTE -Sources” 
  1. M. Lester: “President Putin Signs Russian Counter-Sanctions into Law”
  2. M. Volkov: “Leadership Support Provides Compliance Credibility”
  1. ECS Presents “ITAR/EAR Boot Camp (Seminar Level I)” on 10-11 Jul in Long Beach, CA
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Latest Amendments: ATF (15 Jan 2016), Customs (12 Apr 2018), DOD/NISPOM (18 May 2016), EAR (4 Jun 2018), FACR/OFAC (19 Mar 2018), FTR (24 Apr 2018), HTSUS (1 Jun 2018), ITAR (14 Feb 2018) 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 

EXIMITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

EXIM_a1

1. Commerce/BIS Seeks Comments on Licensing Responsibilities and Enforcement
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
83 FR 25997: Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Licensing Responsibilities and Enforcement
* AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Department of Commerce.
* ACTION: Notice. …
* DATES: Written comments must be submitted on or before August 6, 2018.
* ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20230 (or via the internet at PRAcomments@doc.gov).
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Mark Crace, BIS ICB Liaison, (202) 482-8093, mark.crace@bis.doc.gov.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
   This information collection supports the various collections, notifications, reports, and information exchanges that are needed by the Office of Export Enforcement and Customs to enforce the Export Administration Regulations and maintain the national security of the United States. …
   Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden (including hours and cost) of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. …
 
  Sheleen Dumas, Departmental Lead PRA Officer, Office of the Chief Information Officer.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a2

2. Commerce/BIS Seeks Comments on Request for the Appointment of a Technical Advisory Committee
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.)
 
83 FR 25996-25997: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Request for the Appointment of a Technical Advisory Committee …
  – Agency: Bureau of Industry and Security.
  – Title: Request for the Appointment of a Technical Advisory Committee.
  – Form Number(s): N/A.
  – OMB Control Number: 0694-0100. …
  – Needs and Uses: This collection of information is required by the Export Administration Regulations and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) were established to advise and assist the U.S. Government on export control matters such as proposed revisions to export control lists, licensing procedures, assessments of the foreign availability of controlled products, and export control regulations. Under this collection, interested parties may submit a request to BIS to establish a new TAC. The Bureau of Industry and Security provides administrative support for these Committees. …
  Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov.
 
  Sheleen Dumas, Departmental Lead PRA Officer, Office of the Chief Information Officer.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a3

3. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 1303, Ship’s Store Declaration
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
83 FR 26072-26073: Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship’s Store Declaration
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments; extension of an existing collection of information.
* SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA). The information collection is published in the Federal Register to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Comments are encouraged and will be accepted (no later than August 6, 2018) to be assured of consideration. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional PRA information should be directed to Seth Renkema, Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, 90 K Street NE, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, Telephone number (202) 325-0056 or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. Please note that the contact information provided here is solely for questions regarding this notice. Individuals seeking information about other CBP programs should contact the CBP National Customer Service Center at 877-227-5511, (TTY) 1-800-877-8339, or CBP website.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Ship’s Stores Declaration.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0018.
  – Form Number: CBP Form 1303.
  – Current Actions: CBP proposes to extend the expiration date of this information collection with no change to the burden hours. There is no change to the information collected. …
  – Abstract: CBP Form 1303, Ship’s Stores Declaration, is used by the carriers to declare articles to be retained on board the vessel, such as sea stores, ship’s stores (e.g. alcohol and tobacco products), controlled narcotic drugs or bunker fuel in a format that can be readily audited and checked by CBP. This form collects information about the ship, the ports of arrival and departure, and the articles on the ship. CBP Form 1303 form is provided for by 19 CFR 4.7, 4.7a, 4.81, 4.85 and 4.87 and is accessible here. …
 
  Dated: May 30, 2018.
Seth D. Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a4

4. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Licensed Firearms Manufacturers Records of Production, Disposition, and Supporting Data
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
83 FR 26089-26090: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed eCollection eComments Requested; Revision of a Currently Approved Collection; Licensed Firearms Manufacturers Records of Production, Disposition, and Supporting Data
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice. …
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for an additional 30 days until July 5, 2018.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have additional comments, particularly with respect to the estimated public burden or associated response time, have suggestions, need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions, or desire any other additional information, please contact Dawn Smith, ATF Firearms Industry Programs Branch either by mail at 244 Needy Road, Martinsburg, WV 25405, by email at fipb-informationcollection@atf.gov, or by telephone at 304-267-1994. Written comments and/or suggestions can also be directed to the Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention Department of Justice Desk Officer, Washington, DC 20503 or sent to OIRA_submissions@omb.eop.gov.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – The Title of the Form/Collection: Licensed Firearms
Manufacturers Records of Production, Disposition, and Supporting Data.
  – Form number: None.
  – Component: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of Justice. …
  – Abstract: Firearm manufacturers’ records are permanent records of all firearms manufactured and records of their disposition. These records are vital to support ATF’s mission to inquire about the disposition of any firearm in the course of a criminal investigation. …
  If additional information is required contact: Melody Braswell, Department Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Two Constitution Square, 145 N Street NE, 3E.405A, Washington, DC 20530.
 
  Dated: May 31, 2018.
Melody Braswell, Department Clearance Officer for PRA, U.S. Department of Justice.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a5

5. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Registered Importers of Arms, Ammunition & Implements of War on the USMIL
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
83 FR 26090-26091: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed eCollection eComments Requested; Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Registered Importers of Arms, Ammunition & Implements of War on the U.S. Munitions Import List (“USMIL”)
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice. …
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for an additional 30 days until July 5, 2018.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have additional comments, particularly with respect to the estimated public burden or associated response time, have suggestions, need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions, or desire any other additional information, please contact Desiree Dickinson either by mail at Firearms and Explosives Imports Branch, 244 Needy Road Martinsburg, WV 25405, by email at desiree.dickinson@atf.gov, or by telephone at (304) 616-4584.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – The Title of the Form/Collection: Records of Acquisition and Disposition, Registered Importers of Arms, Ammunition & Implements of War on the U.S. Munitions Import List.
  – Form number: None.
  – Component: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of Justice. …
  – Abstract: This information collection involves records of imported items that are on the United States Munitions Import List. The importers must register with ATF, file an intent to import specific items, as well as certify to the Bureau, that the list of imported items were received. The records are maintained at the registrant’s business premises, where they are available for inspection by ATF officers during compliance inspections or criminal investigations. …
 
  Dated: May 31, 2018.
Melody Braswell, Department Clearance Officer for PRA, U.S. Department of Justice.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a6

6. Justice/ATF Seeks Comments on Form 5300.5, Report of Firearms Transactions–Demand 2
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
83 FR 26091-26092: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed eCollection eComments Requested; Report of Firearms Transactions–Demand 2 (ATF Form 5300.5)
* AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Department of Justice.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice. …
* DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for an additional 30 days until July 5, 2018.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have additional comments, particularly with respect to the estimated public burden or associated response time, have suggestions, need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions, or desire any other additional information, please contact Ed Stely, Branch Chief, Tracing Operations and Records Management Branch, National Tracing Center Division either by mail at 244 Needy Road, Martinsburg, WV 25405, by email at Edward.Stely@atf.gov, or by telephone at 304-260-1515. Written comments and/or suggestions can also be directed to the Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention Department of Justice Desk Officer, Washington, DC 20503 or sent to OIRA_submissions@omb.eop.gov.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – The Title of the Form/Collection: Report of Firearms Transactions–Demand 2 …
  – Form number: 5300.5.
  – Component: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of Justice. …
  – Abstract: The ATF Form 5300.5 is used when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Official has determined that the Federal Firearms Licensee (FFL) has met the Demand 2 reporting requirements. The Demand 2 Program requires FFLs with 25 or more traces, with a time to crime of 3 years or less in a calendar year, to submit an annual report followed by quarterly reports of used firearms acquired by the FFL. …
  If additional information is required contact: Melody Braswell, Department Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Two Constitution Square, 145 N Street NE, 3E.405A, Washington, DC 20530.
 
  Dated: May 31, 2018.
Melody Braswell, Department Clearance Officer for PRA, U.S. Department of Justice.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a7

7. President Adjusts Imports of Aluminum into the United States
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.)
 
83 FR25849-25855: Adjusting Imports of Aluminum Into the United States
 
By the President of the United States of America a Proclamation
 
  (1) On January 19, 2018, the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) transmitted to me a report on his investigation into the effect of imports of aluminum articles on the national security of the United States under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1862).
 
  (2) In Proclamation 9704 of March 8, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Aluminum Into the United States), I concurred in the Secretary’s finding that aluminum articles are being imported into the United States in such quantities and under such circumstances as to threaten to impair the national security of the United States, and decided to adjust the imports of aluminum articles, as defined in clause 1 of Proclamation 9704, as amended (aluminum articles), by imposing a 10 percent ad valorem tariff on such articles imported from most countries, beginning March 23, 2018. I further stated that any country with which we have a security relationship is welcome to discuss with the United States alternative ways to address the threatened impairment of the national security caused by imports from that country, and noted that, should the United States and any such country arrive at a satisfactory alternative means to address the threat to the national security such that I determine that imports from that country no longer threaten to impair the national security, I may remove or modify the restriction on aluminum articles imports from that country and, if necessary, adjust the tariff as it applies to other countries, as the national security interests of the United States require.
 
  (3) In Proclamation 9710 of March 22, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Aluminum Into the United States), I noted the continuing discussions with the Argentine Republic (Argentina), the Commonwealth of Australia (Australia), the Federative Republic of Brazil (Brazil), Canada, Mexico, the Republic of Korea (South Korea), and the European Union (EU) on behalf of its member countries, on satisfactory alternative means to address the threatened impairment to the national security posed by imports of aluminum articles from those countries. Recognizing that each of these countries and the EU has an important security relationship with the United States, I determined that the necessary and appropriate means to address the threat to national security posed by imports of aluminum articles from these countries was to continue the ongoing discussions and to exempt aluminum articles imports from these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9704, as amended, until May 1, 2018.
 
  (4) In Proclamation 9739 of April 30, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Aluminum Into the United States), I noted that the United States had agreed in principle with Argentina, Australia, and Brazil on satisfactory alternative means to address the threatened impairment to our national security posed by aluminum articles imports from these countries and extended the temporary exemption of these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9704, as amended, in order to finalize the details.
 
  (5) The United States has agreed on a range of measures with Argentina and Australia, including measures to reduce excess aluminum production and excess aluminum capacity, measures that will contribute to increased capacity utilization in the United States, and measures to prevent the trans- shipment of aluminum articles and avoid import surges. In my judgment, these measures will provide effective, long-term alternative means to address these countries’ contribution to the threatened impairment to our national security by restraining aluminum articles exports to the United States from each of them, limiting transshipment and surges, and discouraging excess aluminum capacity and excess aluminum production. In light of these agreements, I have determined that aluminum articles imports from these countries will no longer threaten to impair the national security and thus have decided to exclude these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9704, as amended. The United States will monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the measures agreed upon with these countries to address our national security needs, and I may revisit this determination, as appropriate.
 
  (6) In light of my determination to exclude, on a long-term basis, these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9704, as amended, I have considered whether it is necessary and appropriate in light of our national security interests to make any corresponding adjustments to such tariff as it applies to other countries. I have determined that, in light of the agreed-upon measures with these countries, and the fact that the tariff will now apply to imports of aluminum articles from additional countries, it is necessary and appropriate, at this time, to maintain the current tariff level as it applies to other countries.
 
  (7) Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended, authorizes the President to adjust the imports of an article and its derivatives that are being imported into the United States in such quantities or under such circumstances as to threaten to impair the national security.
 
  (8) Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes the President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) the substance of statutes affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
 
NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended, section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, do hereby proclaim as follows:
 
  (1) Clause 2 of Proclamation 9704, as amended, is further amended by striking the last two sentences and inserting in lieu thereof the following two sentences: ”Except as otherwise provided in this proclamation, or in notices published pursuant to clause 3 of this proclamation, all aluminum articles imports specified in the Annex shall be subject to an additional 10 percent ad valorem rate of duty with respect to goods entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, as follows: (a) on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on March 23, 2018, from all countries except Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, South Korea, and the member countries of the European Union, (b) on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on May 1, 2018, from all countries except Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, and the member countries of the European Union, and (c) on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on June 1, 2018, from all countries except Argentina and Australia. This rate of duty, which is in addition to any other duties, fees, exactions, and charges applicable to such imported aluminum articles, shall apply to imports of aluminum articles from each country as specified in the preceding sentence.”.
 
  (2) In order to implement a quota treatment on aluminum articles imports from Argentina, U.S. note 19 to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTSUS is amended as provided for in Part A of the Annex to this proclamation. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security shall implement this quota as soon as practicable, taking into account all aluminum articles imports from this country since January 1, 2018.
 
  (3) The ”Article description” for heading 9903.85.01 of the HTSUS is amended by deleting ”of Brazil, of Canada, of Mexico, or of the member countries of the European Union”.
 
  (4) For the purposes of administering the quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.85.05 through 9903.85.06 for Argentina, the annual aggregate limits set out in Part B of the Annex to this proclamation shall apply for the period starting with calendar year 2018 and for subsequent years, unless modified or terminated. The quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.85.05 through 9903.85.06 for Argentina, which for calendar year 2018 shall take into account all aluminum articles imports from Argentina since January 1, 2018, shall be effective for aluminum articles entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after June 1, 2018, and shall be implemented by CBP as soon as practicable, consistent with the superior text to subheadings 9903.85.05 through 9903.85.06. The Secretary of Commerce shall monitor the implementation of the quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.85.05 through 9903.85.06 and shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the United States Trade Representative, and such other senior Executive Branch officials as the Secretary deems appropriate, inform the President of any circumstance that in the Secretary’s opinion might indicate that an adjustment of the quantitative limitations is necessary.
 
  (5) The Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with CBP and with other relevant executive departments and agencies, shall revise the HTSUS so that it conforms to the amendments and effective dates directed in this proclamation. The Secretary shall publish any such modification to the HTSUS in the Federal Register.
 
  (6) Clause 5 of Proclamation 9710, as amended, is amended by striking the phrase ”as amended by Proclamation 9710,” in the first and second sentences and inserting in lieu thereof the following phrase: ”as amended, or to the quantitative limitations established by proclamation,”. Clause 5 of Proclamation 9710, as amended, is further amended by inserting the phrase ”or quantitative limitations” after the words ”ad valorem rates of duty” in the first and second sentences.
 
  (7) Clause 4 of Proclamation 9739 is amended by striking the phrase ”as amended by clause 1 of this proclamation,” and inserting in lieu thereof the following phrase: ”as amended, or to the quantitative limitations established by proclamation,” in the first sentence. Clause 4 of Proclamation 9739 is further amended by striking the words ”by clause 3 of this proclamation” from the second sentence.
 
  (8) Any provision of previous proclamations and Executive Orders that is inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation is superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-second.
 
(Presidential Sig.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a8

8. President Adjusts Imports of Steel into the United States
(Source: Federal Register, 5 June 2018.)
 
83 FR 25857-25877: Adjusting Imports of Steel Into the United States
 
(1) On January 11, 2018, the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) transmitted to me a report on his investigation into the effect of imports of steel mill articles on the national security of the United States under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1862).
 
(2) In Proclamation 9705 of March 8, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Steel Into the United States), I concurred in the Secretary’s finding that steel mill articles are being imported into the United States in such quantities and under such circumstances as to threaten to impair the national security of the United States, and decided to adjust the imports of steel mill articles, as defined in clause 1 of Proclamation 9705, as amended (steel articles), by imposing a 25 percent ad valorem tariff on such articles imported from most countries, beginning March 23, 2018. I further stated that any country with which we have a security relationship is welcome to discuss with the United States alternative ways to address the threatened impairment of the national security caused by imports from that country, and noted that, should the United States and any such country arrive at a satisfactory alternative means to address the threat to the national security such that I determine that imports from that country no longer threaten to impair the national security, I may remove or modify the restriction on steel articles imports from that country and, if necessary, adjust the tariff as it applies to other countries, as the national security interests of the United States require.
 
(3) In Proclamation 9711 of March 22, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Steel Into the United States), I noted the continuing discussions with the Argentine Republic (Argentina), the Commonwealth of Australia (Australia), the Federative Republic of Brazil (Brazil), Canada, Mexico, the Republic of Korea (South Korea), and the European Union (EU) on behalf of its member countries, on satisfactory alternative means to address the threatened impairment to the national security posed by imports of steel articles from those countries. Recognizing that each of these countries and the EU has an important security relationship with the United States, I determined that the necessary and appropriate means to address the threat to national security posed by imports of steel articles from these countries was to continue the ongoing discussions and to exempt steel articles imports from these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9705, as amended, until May 1, 2018.
 
(4) In Proclamation 9740 of April 30, 2018 (Adjusting Imports of Steel Into the United States), I noted that the United States had agreed in principle with Argentina, Australia, and Brazil on satisfactory alternative means to address the threatened impairment to our national security posed by steel articles imports from these countries and extended the temporary exemption of these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9705, as amended, in order to finalize the details.
 
(5) The United States has agreed on a range of measures with these countries, including measures to reduce excess steel production and excess steel capacity, measures that will contribute to increased capacity utilization in the United States, and measures to prevent the transshipment of steel articles and avoid import surges. In my judgment, these measures will provide effective, long-term alternative means to address these countries’ contribution to the threatened impairment to our national security by restraining steel articles exports to the United States from each of them, limiting transshipment and surges, and discouraging excess steel capacity and excess steel production. In light of these agreements, I have determined that steel articles imports from these countries will no longer threaten to impair the national security and thus have decided to exclude these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9705, as amended. The United States will monitor the implementation and effectiveness of the measures agreed upon with these countries to address our national security needs, and I may revisit this determination, as appropriate.
 
(6) In light of my determination to exclude, on a long-term basis, these countries from the tariff proclaimed in Proclamation 9705, as amended, I have considered whether it is necessary and appropriate in light of our national security interests to make any corresponding adjustments to such tariff as it applies to other countries. I have determined that, in light of the agreed-upon measures with these countries, and the fact that the tariff will now apply to imports of steel articles from additional countries, it is necessary and appropriate, at this time, to maintain the current tariff level as it applies to other countries.
 
(7) Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended, authorizes the President to adjust the imports of an article and its derivatives that are being imported into the United States in such quantities or under such circumstances as to threaten to impair the national security.
 
(8) Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes the President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) the substance of statutes affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
 
NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended, section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, do hereby proclaim as follows:
 
(1) The superior text to subheadings 9903.80.05 through 9903.80.58 of the HTSUS is amended by replacing ”South Korea” with ”Argentina, of Brazil, or of South Korea”.
 
(2) For the purposes of administering the quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.80.05 through 9903.80.58 for Argentina and Brazil, the annual aggregate limits for each country set out in the Annex to this proclamation shall apply for the period starting with calendar year 2018 and for subsequent years, unless modified or terminated. The quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.80.05 through 9903.80.58 for these countries, which for calendar year 2018 shall take into account all steel articles imports from each respective country since January 1, 2018, shall be effective for steel articles entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after June 1, 2018, and shall be implemented by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security as soon as practicable, consistent with the superior text to subheadings 9903.80.05 through 9903.80.58. The Secretary of Commerce shall monitor the implementation of the quantitative limitations applicable to subheadings 9903.80.05 through 9903.80.58 and shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the United States Trade Representative, and such other senior Executive Branch officials as the Secretary deems appropriate, inform the President of any circumstance that in the Secretary’s opinion might indicate that an adjustment of the quantitative limitations is necessary.
 
(3) The text of subdivision (e) of U.S. note 16 to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTSUS is amended by striking the last sentence and inserting in lieu thereof the following sentence: ”Beginning on July 1, 2018, imports from any such country in an aggregate quantity under any such subheading during any of the periods January through March, April through June, July through September, or October through December in any year that is in excess of 500,000 kg and 30 percent of the total aggregate quantity provided for a calendar year for such country, as set forth on the internet site of CBP, shall not be allowed.”.
 
(4) The Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with CBP and with other relevant executive departments and agencies, shall revise the HTSUS so that it conforms to the amendments and effective dates directed in this proclamation. The Secretary shall publish any such modification to the HTSUS in the Federal Register.
 
(5) Clause 5 of Proclamation 9711, as amended, is amended by striking the phrase ”as amended by Proclamation 9711,” in the first and second sentences and inserting in lieu thereof the following phrase: ”as amended, or to the quantitative limitations established by proclamation,”. Clause 5 of Proclamation 9711, as amended, is further amended by inserting the phrase ”or quantitative limitations” after the words ”ad valorem rates of duty” in the first and second sentences.
 
(6) Clause 5 of Proclamation 9740 is amended by striking the phrase ”as amended by clause 1 of this proclamation,” and inserting in lieu thereof the following phrase: ”as amended, or to the quantitative limitations established by proclamation,” in the first sentence. Clause 5 of Proclamation 9740 is further amended by striking the words ”by clause 4 of this proclamation” from the second sentence.
 
(7) Any provision of previous proclamations and Executive Orders that is inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation is superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-second.
 
(Presidential Sig.)

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OGSOTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

OGS_a19. Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
(Source: Federal Register)

* Commerce; Bureau of Industry and Security; RULES; Unverified List; Correction [Publication Date: 6 June 2018.]
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(Source: 
Commerce/BIS
)

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(Source:
CSMS #18-000377, 5 June 2018.)
 
Pursuant to the Presidential Proclamation for articles subject to section 232 measures, imports of steel mill products from Argentina, Brazil and South Korea; and imports of aluminum products from Argentina; entered on or after 12:01 am eastern daylight time on June 1, 2018, are subject to absolute quota.
 
Steel and aluminum products subject to section 232 absolute quota should be filed with appropriate classification and corresponding absolute quota entry type.
 
For additional information on absolute quota on steel and aluminum products, please refer to cbp.gov quota page.
 
Additional information on the May 31, 2018 deployment of Quota Status Messages in ACE can be found in the ACE Quota Status Message Information Notice on CBP.gov/ACE or here.
 
If you need assistance or have questions, contact the Headquarters Quota and Agriculture Branch (QAB) at HQ QUOTA HQQUOTA@cbp.dhs.gov or call (202) 863-6560.
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(Source:
Justice, 4 Jun 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
Vladimir Nevidomy, 32, of Hallandale Beach, Florida, was sentenced to 26 months in prison, to be followed by three years of supervised release, for conspiring to illegally export military-grade night vision and thermal vision devices, and ammunition primers to Russia. …
 
According to information contained in court documents, from as early as April 2013 through November 2013, customers in Russia contacted Nevidomy by email requesting night vision rifle scopes, thermal monoculars and ammunition primers, all of which were on the U.S. Munitions List and subject to export control by the U.S. Department of State. Nevidomy proceeded to obtain at least three ATN MARS 4×4 night-vision rifle scopes and an ODIN 61BW thermal multi-purpose monocular from U.S. vendors by falsely representing to the vendors that the items were not for export.
 
After the U.S. vendors sent the night vision devices to Nevidomy in South Florida, he exported them to his co-defendant in Russia by either concealing the defense articles in household goods shipments sent through a freight forwarding company or using a private Russian postal service that operated in South Florida. In June 2013, Nevidomy aided and abetted the export of the ATN MARS 4×4 night-vision rifle scopes from the U.S. to the co-defendant in Russia, and in August 2013, he exported the ODIN 61BW thermal multi-purpose monocular from the U.S. to the co-defendant in Russia.
 
On or about July 19, 2013, the same co-defendant sent an email to Nevidomy requesting 1,000 large-rifle ammunition primers to be shipped to Vladivostok, Russia. On or about Oct. 2, 2013, Nevidomy attempted to export 1,000 Sellier & Bellot ammunition primers from the U.S. to the co-defendant in Vladivostok. These ammunition primers were seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
 
These night vision rifle scopes, thermal monocular and ammunition primers required a license or other authorization from the U.S. Department of State before being exported from the U.S. since they were on the U.S. Munitions List. A certified license history check revealed that neither Nevidomy, a Ukraine-born naturalized U.S. citizen, nor his associates ever applied or attempted to apply for an export license from the State Department for the night-vision equipment or ammunition primers. …
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(Source:
Treasury/OFAC, 4 June 2018.)  
 
The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is issuing Ukraine-/Russia-related General License 16. General License 16 authorizes U.S. persons to engage in specified transactions related to winding down or maintaining business involving EN+ Group PLC, JSC EuroSibEnergo, or any entity in which EN+ Group PLC or JSC EuroSibEnergo owns, directly or indirectly, a 50 percent or greater interest, until October 23, 2018. 
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NWSNEWS

(Source:
DW.com, 5 June 2018.)
 
The 58-year-old Utah resident held a top-secret clearance for many years and has been charged with trying to spy for China. He was detained in Seattle, about to take a flight to China.
 
The US Justice Department said on Monday a 41-page felony complaint alleged the man was paid $800,000 (€684,000) for passing on technology and information about US military and intelligence issues.
 
Agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) arrested the man on Saturday while he was on his way to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to catch a connecting flight to China.
 
The man spent more than 20 years in the US Army, including time with the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). He left the military in 2006 but worked as a civilian case officer with the DIA for several months.
 
He then attended trade conferences on behalf of China and is accused of sharing information with officials linked to Chinese intelligence. He also tried to work as a double agent, according to the felony complaint.
 
  “Betrayal”
 
  “His alleged actions are a betrayal of our nation’s security and the American people and are an affront to his former intelligence community colleagues,” said John Demers, the head of the Justice Department’s National Security Division.
 
The accused appeared in a Seattle court on Monday to hear the 15-count complaint against him.
 
If convicted, he faces life in prison.
 
His case is the latest incident of alleged spying by US intelligence agents for the Chinese government. A former CIA case officer, and a former intelligence agent have also been charged with selling intelligence to Beijing.

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(Source:
Expeditors News, 4 June 2018.)
 
On May 31, 2018, Mexico’s Minister of Economy announced that Mexico will impose equivalent measures in response to the U.S. Section 232 tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum into the U.S.
 
Some of the products listed in the announcement include flat steel (hot rolled steel and cold rolled steel, including coated and various pipes), lamps, pork legs and shoulders, sausages and food preparations, apples, grapes, blueberries, and various cheeses. The full list, along with the statistical breakouts and their increased duty rates, are expected to be published soon.
 
The measure will remain in force until the U.S. government eliminates the Section 232 tariffs.
 
The Minister of Economy’s announcement may be found here.

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NWS_a317. The Jerusalem Post: ”
Intel Report: Iran Seeks Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology in Germany”
(Source: The Jerusalem Post, 2 June 2018.) [Excerpts.]
 
… The intelligence agency of the German state of Baden-Württemberg has revealed in an eye-popping report that Iran’s regime sought during 2017 to obtain technology and scientific knowledge to produce weapons of mass destruction and advance its missile program.

“Iran continued to undertake, as did Pakistan and Syria, efforts to obtain goods and know-how to be used for the development of weapons of mass destruction and to optimize corresponding missile-delivery systems,” said the intelligence document reviewed by The Jerusalem Post.


Since the Iran nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), was reached between the world powers and the Islamic Republic in July 2015, Iran’s regime attempted to covertly secure advanced technology for its nuclear and ballistic-missile programs, according to German intelligence reports examined by the Post. …

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NWS_a418. Reuters: “Exclusive: U.S. May Soon Claim Up to $1.7 billion Penalty from China’s ZTE -Sources”
(Source: Reuters, 1 Jun 2018.)
 
The Trump administration may soon claim as much as $1.7 billion penalty from ZTE Corp, as it looks to punish and tighten control over the Chinese telecommunications company before allowing it back into business, according to people familiar with the matter.
 
The Commerce Department is also seeking unfettered site visits to verify U.S. components are being used as claimed by ZTE, and wants it to post calculations of the U.S. components in its products on a website, the people said.
 
China’s No.2 telecommunications equipment maker has been crippled by a ban imposed in April on buying U.S. technology components for seven years for breaking an agreement reached after it was caught illegally shipping goods to Iran and North Korea.
 
The negotiations with ZTE come as U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross heads to Beijing this weekend for trade talks.
 
One source said Washington also wants ZTE to replace its board and executive team as soon as 30 days, but a deal still has not been finalized and the sources cautioned that the penalties were fluid and the terms could change.
 
Representatives from the Commerce Department and ZTE did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
 
American companies provide an estimated 25 percent to 30 percent of components in ZTE’s equipment, which includes smartphones and gear to build telecommunications networks.
 
The company’s status has become an important bargaining chip in high-level trade talks between China and Washington amid reports that if the United States eases up on ZTE, China will buy more American agricultural goods.
 
U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted last month that he told Commerce officials to find a way for ZTE to get back into business, later mentioning a $1.3 billion fine and changes to its board and top management as a way to penalize the company before allowing it back into business.
 
But ZTE’s possible resuscitation has met strong resistance in Congress, where both Democrats and Trump’s fellow Republicans have accused him of bowing to pressure from Beijing to help a company that has been labeled a threat to U.S. national security.
 
The company, which suspended major operations in May, desperately needs a deal to get back in business, with estimates it has lost over $3 billion since the April 15 ban on doing business with U.S. suppliers, a source familiar with the matter said last week.
 
PENALTY MAY BE LESS
 
The April ban came after the Shenzhen-based company admitted that while it dismissed four senior employees who had been involved in the original wrongdoing, it had not disciplined 35 others by either reducing their bonuses or reprimanding them, despite statements to the contrary, senior Commerce Department officials told Reuters at the time.
 
While it is expected the administration will claim a $1.7 billion penalty for ZTE, sources said that after breaking the figure down, ZTE will likely actually pay about $1 billion.
 
In addition, it will be asked to put $400 million in escrow, one of the people said.
 
In 2017, ZTE paid $892 million in civil and criminal penalties, with an additional $300 million suspended unless there were future violations. As part of a new deal, the $300 million would go into escrow in a U.S. bank, along with an extra $100 million, the person said.
 
Furthermore, the person said, the U.S. is expected to count $361 million in civil penalties that ZTE paid the Commerce Department last year in its $1.7 billion figure, even though that penalty was already collected as part of the $892 million.
 
As part of any new agreement, the sources said, the U.S. wants ZTE to hire a new person to police its compliance. The compliance contractor would provide oversight along with an outside monitor who was retained as part of the March 2017 guilty plea.
 
The U.S. also wants its representatives to make site visits to check ZTE’s claims about components without coordinating with Chinese government officials, as required by a non-public agreement between the countries, sources said.
 
Last year, ZTE paid over $2.3 billion to U.S. suppliers, a senior ZTE official told Reuters last month. Qualcomm, Broadcom Inc, and Intel Corp, as well as smaller optical component makers Acacia Communications and Oclaro Inc supply ZTE.

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COMMCOMMENTARY

COMM_a0
19. M. Lester: “President Putin Signs Russian Counter-Sanctions into Law”
(Source: European Sanctions Blog, 5 June 2018.)
 
* Author: Maya Lester, Esq., Brick Court Chambers, maya.lester@brickcourt.co.uk, +44 20 7379 3550.
 
President Putin has now signed Russian counter-measures into law. These measures, as previously reported, provide for counter-sanctions including restrictions on the import into Russia of products and/or raw materials originating from the USA and other foreign states, and on the export from Russia of products to foreign citizens. The legislation gives President Putin the power to choose the sectors and products that will be affected, and to “ban or suspend co-operation with a hostile state”.
 
second Bill that would make it a crime for anyone to comply with foreign sanctions against Russia has been delayed for business impact consultations.
 

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COMM_a01
20. M. Volkov: “Leadership Support Provides Compliance Credibility”

(Source: Volkov Law Group Blog, 4 June 2018. Reprinted by permission.)
 
* Author: Michael Volkov, Esq., Volkov Law Group,
mvolkov@volkovlaw.com, 240-505-1992.
 
We often hear the compliance refrain on the importance of tone-at-the-top – meaning when the board, the CEO and senior executives demonstrate by communications and by conduct their commitment to a culture of ethics and compliance.
 
This single idea carries with it enormous importance to the success or failure of a compliance program. A positive tone-at-the-top permeates every aspect of a compliance program and specifically emboldens the chief compliance officer and his/her authority in the organization.
 
A CCO has to devote time to ensuring that the board, CEO and senior executives consistently support the CCO’s efforts. To accomplish this, the CCO has to communicate often with the board and senior officials, report on ethics and compliance program developments, and reinforce the importance of their participation to the ultimate success of the company’s ethics and compliance program.
 
Building on this asset, the CCO has to strategically deploy this support when necessary to accomplish various tasks. Consider this example – a CCO is deploying a new third-party due diligence automated platform. To be successful, the business has to become familiar and comfortable with the new automated tool. Before initiating this new due diligence tool, the CCO needs the support and approval from the CEO and senior management. Without such support, the CCO’s likelihood to succeed will diminish.
 
In meeting with managers and employees responsible for implementing the automated due diligence system, the CCO now has an important card to play when there is resistance to change. The CCO can specifically cite the fact that the CEO has committed to implementing the automated due diligence tool and expects it to be done. Suddenly, the dynamics in the meeting will change – the possible resistance will quickly melt under the CEO’s support for the CCO’s initiative. The managers and employees will fall in line and support the new initiative.
 
My example is not meant to highlight a threat or fear in persuading managers and employees to back a new operational and compliance initiative. To the contrary, a CEO’s support for compliance is important for the CCO to cite when needed to move the compliance ball.
 
This simple example is just one of many ways in which a CEO and senior executive support for ethics and compliance advances a company’s ethical culture. A CFO who understands the importance of compliance will ensure that financial controls are operating appropriately, will reinforce compliance with these controls, and most importantly will act to ensure the accuracy of Sarbanes-Oxley certifications.
 
Every senior executive acts with the same degree of importance and impact over the functions that he or she supervises. When senior executives support the company’s ethics and compliance program a CCO can coordinate with their support to leverage the CCO’s influence and authority. It is a critical lifeline for a CCO.
 
Those CCOs who do not have the support of their CEOs and senior executives will face a tough assignment in designing and implementing an effective ethics and compliance program. In the absence of such support, a CCO has only one alternative (other than leaving the company) – create a compliance committee, build a consensus of support and seek to build support by communicating to senior management, the CEO and the board the importance of compliance projects and initiatives. It is a difficult task and will slow down the CCOs progress in building an effective ethics and compliance program.
 
For those CCOs who have the support of their boards, CEOs and senior executives, they should count their blessings, coordinate with such supporters and leverage their support to accomplish their compliance mission.

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TECEX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

 
* What: ITAR/EAR Boot Camp (Seminar Level I), Long Beach, CA
* When: July 10-11, 2018
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Solutions (ECS)
* ECS Speaker Panel:  Suzanne Palmer, Mal Zerden
* Register: Here or by calling 866-238-4018 or e-mail spalmer@exportcompliancesolutions.com.   
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ENEDITOR’S NOTES

 
Adam Smith (5 Jun 1723 – 17 Jul 1790; was a Scottish economist, philosopher, and author. Smith is best known for An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776), usually abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, which is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics.)
  – “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest.” 
  – “The real tragedy of the poor is the poverty of their aspirations.”

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EN_a323
. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date?
(Source: Editor)

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  The latest amendments to applicable regulations are listed below.
 
*
ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS
: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War
  – Last Amendment: 15 Jan 2016: 81 FR 2657-2723: Machineguns, Destructive Devices and Certain Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible Persons of a Trust or Legal Entity With Respect To Making or Transferring a Firearm. 
 
*
CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199
  – Last Amendment: 12 Apr 2018: 83 FR 15736-15740: CBP Decision No. 18-04; Definition of Importer Security Filing Importer (ISF Importer)
 
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM): DoD 5220.22-M

  – Last Amendment: 18 May 2016: Change 2
: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary 
here
.)


EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR)
: 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774

  – Last Amendment: 4 Jun 2018: 83 FR 25559-25561: Implementation of the February 2017 Australia Group (AG) Intersessional Decisions and the June 2017 AG Plenary Understandings; Addition of India to the AG; Correction

  
*
FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR)
: 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders

  – Last Amendment: 19 Mar 2018:
83 FR 11876-11881: Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties 

 
*
FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR)
: 15 CFR Part 30
  – Last Amendment: 24 Apr 2018: 3 FR 17749-17751: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on the Collection and Confidentiality of Kimberley Process Certificates
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here.
  – The latest edition (30 Apr 2018) of Bartlett’s Annotated FTR (“BAFTR”), by James E. Bartlett III, is available for downloading in Word format. The BAFTR contains all FTR amendments, FTR Letters and Notices, a large Index, and approximately 250 footnotes containing case annotations, practice tips, Census/AES guidance, and explanations of the numerous errors contained in the official text. Subscribers receive revised copies in Microsoft Word every time the FTR is amended. The BAFTR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance websiteBITAR subscribers are entitled to a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BAFTR. Government employees (including military) and employees of universities are eligible for a 50% discount on both publications at www.FullCircleCompiance.eu.  
 
*
HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA)
, 1 Jan 2018: 19 USC 1202 Annex. (“HTS” and “HTSA” are often seen as abbreviations for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated, shortened versions of “HTSUSA”.)
  – Last Amendment:
1 Jun 2018: Harmonized System Update 1808, containing 11,876 ABI records and 2,228 harmonized tariff records  

  – HTS codes for AES are available 
here.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available 
here.
 
INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130.

  – Last Amendment: 14 Feb 2018: 83 FR 6457-6458: Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Addition of South Sudan [Amends ITAR Part 126.] 

  – The only available fully updated copy (latest edition: 25 Apr 2018) of the ITAR with all amendments is contained in Bartlett’s Annotated 
ITAR

(“BITAR”)
, by James E. Bartlett III. The BITAR contains all ITAR amendments to date, plus a large Index, over 800 footnotes containing amendment histories, case annotations, practice tips, DDTC guidance, and explanations of errors in the official ITAR text. Subscribers receive updated copies of the BITAR in Word by email, usually revised within 24 hours after every ITAR amendment.
 The BITAR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance
 
website
. BAFTR subscribers receive a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BITAR, please
contact us
to receive your discount code. 

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EN_a0324
Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories

(Source: Editor) 

Review last week’s top Ex/Im stories in “Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories” published 
here

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EPEDITORIAL POLICY

* The Ex/Im Daily Update is a publication of FCC Advisory B.V., compiled by: Editor, James E. Bartlett III; Assistant Editors, Alexander P. Bosch and Vincent J.A. Goossen; and Events & Jobs Editor, John Bartlett. The Ex/Im Daily Update is emailed every business day to approximately 8,000 readers of changes to defense and high-tech trade laws and regulations. We check the following sources daily: Federal Register, Congressional Record, Commerce/AES, Commerce/BIS, DHS/CBP, DOE/NRC, DOJ/ATF, DoD/DSS, DoD/DTSA, FAR/DFARS, State/DDTC, Treasury/OFAC, White House, and similar websites of Australia, Canada, U.K., and other countries and international organizations.  Due to space limitations, we do not post Arms Sales notifications, Denied Party listings, or Customs AD/CVD items.

* RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS: This email contains no proprietary, classified, or export-controlled information. All items are obtained from public sources or are published with permission of private contributors, and may be freely circulated without further permission, provided attribution is given to “The Export/Import Daily Bugle of (date)”. Any further use of contributors’ material, however, must comply with applicable copyright laws.

* CAVEAT: The contents of this newsletter cannot be relied upon as legal or expert advice.  Consult your own legal counsel or compliance specialists before taking actions based upon news items or opinions from this or other unofficial sources.  If any U.S. federal tax issue is discussed in this communication, it was not intended or written by the author or sender for tax or legal advice, and cannot be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing, or recommending to another party any transaction or tax-related matter.


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