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17-0920 Wednesday “Daily Bugle”

17-0920 Wednesday “Daily Bugle”

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

TOP
The Daily Bugle is a free daily newsletter from Full Circle Compliance, containing changes to export/import regulations (ATF, Customs, NISPOM, EAR, FACR/OFAC, FTR/AES, HTSUS, and ITAR), plus news and events.  Subscribe 
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  1. Commerce/Census Corrects FTR, Clarifies Filling Requirements
  1. Ex/Im Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
  2. Commerce/BIS Posts Debarment Orders for Three Persons
  3. Commerce/Census: “Automated Commercial Environment Export Reports… What’s New?”
  4. DHS/CBP Announces FDA ITACS Account Management Functionality
  5. DHS/CBP Announces Local Port Closure for San Juan Field Office, 19 Sep
  6. DHS/CBP Ends Guidance for South Florida Filers Without Power – Additional Snow Days
  7. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)
  8. Canada Publishes Various CETA Customs Tariff Regulations
  9. Canada Publishes Various Export and Import Related Regulations
  1. Common Dreams: “Gun Stocks Surge as Trump Pushes to Ease Export Regulations for Assault Weapons”
  2. N.Y. Times: “Trump Says He’s Made a Decision on Iran Nuclear Deal”
  1. M. Volkov: “No More Excuses: CCOs Have to Embrace Technology”
  2. R.C. Burns: “America’s Worst Spy Sentenced”
  1. ECS Presents ITAR/EAR Critical Compliance & Agreement Workshop on 17-18 Oct in Charleston, SC
  2. ECTI Presents “EAR Hardware & Materials Classifications: Learning by Doing Webinar – A Two Part Series,” 25 Oct & 8 Nov
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Latest Changes: ATF (15 Jan 2016), Customs (28 Jul 2017), DOD/NISPOM (18 May 2016), EAR (15 Aug 2017), FACR/OFAC (16 Jun 2017), FTR (20 Sep 2017), HTSUS (25 Jul 2017), ITAR (30 Aug 2017) 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 

EXIMEX/IM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

EXIM_a11
. Commerce/Census Corrects FTR, Clarifies Filling Requirements

 
82 FR 43842-43844: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on Filing Requirements; Correction
* AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce Department.
* ACTION: Correcting amendments.
* SUMMARY: On April 19, 2017, the Census Bureau revised the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR). The revisions to the FTR reflected the implementation of the International Trade Data System, in accordance with the Executive Order 13659, Streamlining the Export/Import Process for American Businesses. In the Final Rule, the Census Bureau also amended the appendices section. Appendices B, C, E, and F were removed and appendix D was revised and redesignated as the new appendix B. With the revisions to the appendices section, there are a few sections of the FTR that were inadvertently not updated to reflect these changes. This document corrects the final regulations.
* DATES: Effective on September 20, 2017.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dale C. Kelly, Chief, International Trade Management Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC 20233-6010, by phone: (301) 763-6937, by fax: (301) 763-8835, or by email: dale.c.kelly@census.gov.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  To comply with the requirements of the Foreign Relations Act, Public Law 107-228, the Census Bureau is amending relevant sections of the FTR to revise or clarify export reporting requirements. Therefore, the Census Bureau is correcting 15 CFR part 30 by making the following correcting amendments:
  – Revise Sec. 30.1(c) to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B in the definition of “Exemption legend” because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise Sec. 30.1(c) to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B in the definition of “Postdeparture filing citation” because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise Sec. 30.3(e)(2)(xi) to replace “Foreign port of unloading” with “Foreign port of unlading.”
  – Revise Sec. 30.4(b)(3) to replace “Foreign port of unloading” with “Foreign port of unlading.”
  – Revise Sec. 30.4(b)(4)(ii)(A) to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise Sec. 30.6(a)(18) to remove the reference to appendix B because this appendix is removed from the FTR.
  – Revise Sec. 30.7(b) to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise Sec. 30.8 introductory text to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise Sec. 30.8(b) to replace the reference to Sec. 30.46 with Sec. 30.4(c)(2) for requirements for the filing of export information by pipeline carriers.
  – Revise Sec. 30.35 to replace the reference to appendix D with appendix B because appendix D is redesignated as appendix B.
  – Revise appendix B, IX to replace the reference to Sec. 30.40(d) with Sec. 30.40(c). …
 
   Dated: September 14, 2017.
Ron S. Jarmin, Associate Director for Economic Programs, performing the non-exclusive functions and duties of the Director, Bureau of the Census.

  

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OGSOTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

OGS_a12. Ex/Im Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
(Source: Federal Register

[No items of interest noted today.]

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* Respondent: Dmitrii Karpenko, Nevinnomyssk, Russia
* Charges: On 28 April 2017, in the U.S. District of Court for the Eastern District of New York, Dmitrii Karpenko, a/k/a Simon Fox (“Karpenko”) was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. § 1701, et seq. (2012)) (“IEEPA”). Specifically, Karpenko was convicted of violating Section 206 of IEEPA, 50 50 U.S.C. § 1705, by willfully conspiring with others to export from the United States to Russia microelectronics items controlled pursuant the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”), and under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”), U.S. Department of Commerce (“DOC”) without the required BIS/DOC license. Karpenko was sentenced to time served and an assessment of $100.00.
* Debarred: Five years from the date of Karpenko’s conviction, until 28 April 2022
* Date of Order: 8 September 2017.
 
 
* Respondent: Alexey Krutilin, Ivanovskoe Village, Russia
* Charges: On 28 April 2017, in the U.S. District of Court for the Eastern District of New York, Alexey Krutilin, a/k/a David Powell (“Krutilin”) was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. § 1701, et seq. (2012)) (“IEEPA”). Specifically, Krutilin was convicted of violating Section 206 of IEEPA, 50 50 U.S.C. § 1705, by willfully conspiring with others to export from the United States to Russia microelectronics items controlled pursuant the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”), and under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”), U.S. Department of Commerce (“DOC”) without the required BIS/DOC license. Krutilin was sentenced to time served and an assessment of $100.00.
* Debarred: Ten years from the date of Karpenko’s conviction, until 28 April 2027
* Date of Order: 8 September 2017.
 
 
* Respondent: Ambar Esthela Morales, Fort Worth, TX
* Charges: On 23 March 2016, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, Ambar Esthela Morales (“Morales”) was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. § 2278 (2012)) (“AECA”). Specifically, Morales was convicted of knowingly and willfully attempting to export from the United States to Mexico, 7,942 rounds of 7.62 x 39mm caliber ammunition which were designated as defense articles under Category I of the United States Munitions List, without the required U.S. Department of State licenses. Morales was sentenced to three years in prison, three years of supervised release, and a $100 assessment.
* Debarred: Ten years from the date of Morales conviction, until 23 March 2021.
* Date of Order: 8 September 2017.
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With more than 128,000 Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) export reports run since deployment mid-2015 and more than 6,762 reports run during the month of June 2017 alone, it’s evident that the trade community is using the export reports feature in ACE, and its popularity is ever increasing. 
 
We received a lot of positive feedback and information on ACE Export Reports by EIN that helped us improve the utility of the feature, as well as enhance our training resources library.
 
Customer feedback continues to shape the way we do business. The following examples help illustrate the updates prompted and informed by such customer feedback:
 
  – The available data elements have been updated to include the Country of Ultimate Destination.
  – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) created 11 short topic-based export reports training videos available in the ACE Portal and on the CBP website.
  – A webinar and Q&A on ACE Export Reports was conducted in mid-December 2016 and subsequently an updated version of that webinar that was conducted in July 2017 and may be viewed online now for on-demand viewing and training needs.
  – The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking effective in July 2017 added additional data elements (the Internal Transaction Number, filer name and date of export) to the AES 203 (Agent-Filed Routed) Report to make this report useful. This data is now also searchable by filing date and export date.
 
These are just a few of the ways that you’ve helped us more effectively help you. We realize that users are exploring the export reports feature in ACE. We want to empower our users to utilize all of the available functionality.
 
And, here are just a few reminders:
 
  – The three available reports include: AES 201 (Filer), AES 202 U.S. Principal Party in Interest (USPPI) and AES 203 (Agent-Filed Routed).
  – The AES 201 and AES 202 will initially return a smaller universe of data elements (25). Learn how to add or remove data elements by watching the “Modifying Report Queries” video available on the CBP Export Reports resource page and in the Training Resources area in the ACE Portal.
  – The AES 203 report will only return the handful of data elements that are authorized by the Foreign Trade Regulations. ACE Importer accounts automatically have access to export reports for Employer Identification Numbers (EINs) already vetted by CBP on the import side. ACE Exporter accounts must be vetted by the U.S. Census Bureau.
 
Exporters are able to run comprehensive reports based on their EIN and review the Electronic Export Information that has been filed internally and externally. Authorized agents are able to run reports across the universe of filings they have transmitted, as well as run individual reports at the client level. The benefits of having this type of on-demand access is revolutionary to the export compliance landscape and gives the trade community a powerful auditing capability. We highly recommend that you obtain authorization to access reports if you have not done so already, and if you have access, to explore the functionality that is available to you.
 
Until the next update, happy reporting!
 
P.S. There is even a “Late Filing Indicator” data element that can be added to customized reports … how beneficial is that to your compliance pursuit?
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(Source:
CSMS #17-000596, 19 Sep 2017.)
 
FDA is announcing the release of Import Trade Auxiliary Communication System (ITACS) Account Management functionality for use by the import trade community. This is being implemented in order to improve communication between FDA and the import trade community.
 
Current ITACS web access provides the import trade community with four functions: the ability to check the status of FDA-regulated entries and lines, the ability to submit entry documentation electronically, the ability to electronically submit the location of goods availability for those lines targeted for FDA exam and the ability to check the estimated laboratory analysis completion dates for lines which have been sampled. No login accounts are necessary to access these functions. All that is needed is a valid Customs entry number that has been successfully transmitted to FDA.
 
The new ITACS Account Management functionality enables the electronic distribution of Notices of FDA Action via email and as downloads from within ITACS. It will also allow account holders to view the details of specific information requests, which are currently delivered via hard copy Notices of FDA Action. Implementation of login accounts will also allow for future enhancements requested by the Import Trade Community which require user verification.
 
Benefits to the trade include faster receipt of Notices of FDA Action via email or download in ITACS, no need to maintain paper copies of Notices of FDA Action as they will continue to be available in ITACS even after an entry is closed, and faster receipt of requests for specific information by email or ITACS. Note: If a firm chooses to receive their Notices of FDA Action electronically, paper copies will no longer be mailed to that firm.
 
ITACS Account Management functionality may be used by Filers, Importers of Record and Consignees with an approved ITACS account. Account applicants must have been a party to previous FDA entries for account approval. Please limit ITACS account requests to one individual per firm at the corporate level. That applicant should be a high ranking individual within the firm because that person will have the responsibility to create and manage ITACS accounts for other users within the same firm, regardless of their location. ITACS accounts can be requested via the FDA Unified Registration and Listing System (FURLS).
 
Presentations providing overviews of basic ITACS functionality and the new ITACS Account Management functionality, and how to use both, are available on FDA’s ITACS for Industry internet page.
 
Please direct any questions to ITACSSupport@fda.hhs.gov.

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OGS_a56. DHS/CBP Announces Local Port Closure for San Juan Field Office, 19 Sep

(Source:
CSMS #17-000595, 19 Sep 2017.)
 
Due to the inclement weather caused by the proximity of Hurricane Maria, the commercial trade operations at the San Juan Area Port have been temporarily suspended effective, September 19, 2017.
 
Commercial trade operations are expected to resume normal operations on Friday, September 22, 2017.
 
Below is a list of the ports affected by this local closure:
 
  – 4901 AGUADILLA, PR
  – 4904 FAJARDO, PR
  – 4907 MAYAGUEZ, PR
  – 4908 PONCE, PR
  – 4909 SAN JUAN, PR
  – 4913 LUIS MUÑOZ MARIN – AIR CARGO, PR
 
The port is extending additional days without the assessment of liquidated damages for any entry summaries and payments due from September 19 – 22, 2017.
 
SAN JUAN AREA PORT Trade Operations POC – Mrs. Leida Colon at: (787) 729-6998.

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OGS_a67. DHS/CBP Ends Guidance for South Florida Filers Without Power – Additional Snow Days


(Source: CSMS #17-000597, 19 Sep 2017.)
 
This message serves to notify all affected parties that the allowance of additional local closure days that were granted to South Florida filers who were without power and unable to file entries at the Ports of 5201 (Miami Seaport), 5203 (Port Everglades), 5204 (Port of West Palm Beach), and 5206 (Miami International Airport) will end today, September 19, 2017. See CSMS #17-000581 dated 9/15/17.
 
CBP extended an additional day, without penalty, for any entry summaries and payment of duties that were due on September 13 through September 19 in the Ports of 5201 (Miami Seaport) 5203 (Port Everglades), 5204 (Port of West Palm Beach), and 5206 (Miami International Airport). This courtesy only applied to South Florida filers who were without power, and were unable to transmit entry summaries and payment.
 
If there are any South Florida filers who are still unable to transmit entry summaries and payment due to power outages, please contact SES Bernadette Molina at (305) 869-2684. CBP will review on a case by case basis.

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OGS_a78
. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)

(Source: State/DDTC)

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NWSNEWS

NWS_a111
. Common Dreams: “Gun Stocks Surge as Trump Pushes to Ease Export Regulations for Assault Weapons”

(Source: Common Dreams) [Excerpts.]
 
The Trump administration is reportedly preparing to ease export rules to allow American arms manufacturers to sell more weapons, including assault rifles, to foreign buyers, despite concerns that weakened oversight will fuel global conflict and threaten national security.
 
  “Aides to President Donald Trump are completing a plan to shift oversight of international non-military firearms sales from the State Department to the Commerce Department,” Reuters reported on Tuesday, citing four U.S. senior officials at various agencies. The plan is part of a broader revision of the nation’s weapons export rules that officials said is nearly finalized.
 
Currently, the State Department treats civilian arms exports as military sales, subjecting them to the same scrutiny as weapons like fighter jets. Under Trump’s plan, handguns and assault rifles would be moved from the State Department’s Munitions List to the Commerce Control List, which would enable quicker licensing for sales to foreign buyers.
 
Because the Commerce Department focuses on increasing trade, the shift is expected to significantly boost firearms and ammunition sales. Notably, following the Reuters report on Tuesday, gun stocks surged, with multiple arms companies posting their best days in several months.
 
  “There will be more leeway to do arms sales,” an anonymous official said. “You could really turn the spigot on if you do it the right way.” …

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NWS_a2
12. N.Y. Times: “Trump Says He’s Made a Decision on Iran Nuclear Deal”

(Source: N.Y. Times) [Excerpts.]
 
President Trump said on Wednesday that he had made a decision on what to do about the nuclear agreement his predecessor negotiated with Iran, but declined to tell reporters what it was.
 
“I have decided,” he said, repeating the phrase three times. Pressed by reporters, he added: “I’ll let you know. I’ll let you know.”
 
Mr. Trump’s comments, made as he met with President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority, came the day after he told the United Nations General Assembly that the deal was “an embarrassment for the United States.”
 
Under United States law, Mr. Trump has until Oct. 15 to certify whether Iran is complying with the agreement, which required it to dismantle much of its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of international sanctions. Mr. Trump has already certified Iran’s compliance twice, and Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson acknowledged this week that Iran remains in “technical compliance.”
 
But Mr. Trump has made clear that he is reluctant to certify compliance a third time, citing destabilizing activities by Iran that are not directly covered by the agreement, including its ballistic missile program and support for terrorist groups in the Middle East. If he were to decide against certifying compliance, Congress could reimpose sanctions that were lifted as part of the agreement, which would effectively unravel it. If Congress did not act, the agreement could remain in force.
 
The other five major powers that negotiated the agreement along with President Barack Obama have resisted any effort by Mr. Trump to tear it up. …

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COMMCOMMENTARY

COMM_a01
13. M. Volkov: “No More Excuses: CCOs Have to Embrace Technology”

(Source: Volkov Law Group Blog. Reprinted by permission.)
 
* Author: Michael Volkov, Esq., Volkov Law Group, mvolkov@volkovlaw.com, 240-505-1992.
 
It is time for an honesty check – many CCOs do not like change. CCOs, however, need to embrace change as a powerful force. Compliance is an evolutionary process – it is constantly changing. A compliance program has to move like a shark and constantly take into account new trends, new risks, and new business developments.
 
CCOs who resist change are doomed to fail. This is especially true in one important area – technology. The compliance profession is witnessing an explosion in new technologies needed to support CCOs in carrying out their duties.
 
These new technologies include platforms for third-party risk management, GMET expenditures, internal investigation case management systems, and governance, risk and compliance management programs.
 
I am not suggesting that CCOs are Luddites clinging to their paper, pencils and notebooks. But I am pointing out that CCOs need to devote time and attention to learn about available new technologies and do so quickly.
 
On the horizon are powerful new possibilities like blockchain, which could revolutionize compliance oversight and management. If CCOs do not take the time to learn about these technologies, they could easily be pushed aside by a new breed of CCO, one who embraces technology because of its effectiveness and efficient solutions.
 
Take as an example, third-party risk management. There are a number of attractive solutions in the marketplace that provide effective third-party risk management to onboard third-party agents, distributors, consultants, lobbyists, vendors and suppliers. If you are a mid-sized or large global company, if you have not purchased and installed such a management system, you might be ready for the Luddite world of pens, pencils and paper. Automation does not mean using an open source intelligence database – automation means automating the entire onboarding, monitoring and auditing process through the use of a third-party risk platform.
 
Ask any CCO who has automated third third-party risk program, and I bet you most, if not all, would smile and tell you that the program has reduced the burdens of third-party onboarding and enabled CCOs and their staff to address other projects. In other words, it is a no-brainer.
 
Another example is technology to manage gifts, meals, and entertainment expenses. CCOs should review technology platforms that permit companies to pre-clear and review expenditure requests in a swift and effective manner. These programs can be programmed in a variety of ways to address specific thresholds and GME policy concerns.
 
The benefits of compliance technology encourage greater business compliance. Technology solutions are a win-win: compliance and the business benefit. Business staff is more likely to comply with compliance requirements because third-party onboarding is completed in a shorter time. No longer will businesses have to go through the multi-step questionnaire, follow-up, investigation, contract negotiation process that can last for months.
 
To put it another way, change is good, and technology offers compliance professionals some real benefits. As the compliance profession rises in status, so do the number and capabilities of technological solutions. CCOs cannot turn away from technology – they must embrace it, learn about it and educate decision-makers in the company about the benefits of technology.

 

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COMM_a2
14. R.C. Burns: “
America’s Worst Spy Sentenced

(Source:
Export Law Blog
. Reprinted by permission.)
 
* Author: R. Clifton Burns, Esq., Bryan Cave LLP, Wash DC,
Clif.Burns@bryancave.com
, 202-508-6067).
 
Yesterday, Gregory Allen Justice, a former Boeing engineer, who tried to sell satellite information to undercover agents he believed were Russian spies, was sentenced to five years in jail. I reported on the case previously here, noting that Justice was playing spy to get money for an online girlfriend (who had catfished him with sexy photos of another woman and to whom he was sending gifts, such as charcoal grills from Amazon). Justice, who admitted he was under the spell of  the TV show “The Americans,” Jason Bourne and James Bond (and had even taken online spy courses), demonstrated his intimate knowledge of spy craft when he gave a receipt to the fake spies for the money they paid him after he made his first drop. Seriously. Worst spy ever. He might as well have posted pictures of the drop on Facebook – oh wait, that wouldn’t have been a problem because Russian spies apparently can post on Facebook without anyone noticing.

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TECEX/IM TRAINING EVENTS & CONFERENCES

TEC_a115
. ECS Presents ITAR/EAR Critical Compliance & Agreement Workshop on 17-18 Oct in Charleston, SC

 
* What: ECS Presents ITAR/EAR Critical Compliance & Agreement Workshop
* When: October 17-18, 2017
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Solutions (ECS)
* ECS Speaker Panel:  Suzanne Palmer, Lisa Bencivenga

* Register: Here or by calling 866-238-4018 or e-mail spalmer@exportcompliancesolutions.com 

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TEC_a216. ECTI Presents “EAR Hardware & Materials Classifications: Learning by Doing Webinar – A Two Part Series,” 25 Oct & 8 Nov

(Source: Danielle McClellan, danielle@learnexportcompliance.com)
 
* What: EAR Hardware & Materials Classifications: Learning by Doing – A Two Part Series
* When: (TWO DAYS) Oct. 25; 1:00 p.m. (EDT) & Nov. 8, 2017; 1:00 p.m. (EST)
* Where: Webinars (two part series)
* Sponsor: Export Compliance Training Institute (ECTI)
* ECTI Speaker: Scott Gearity
* Register: Here or Danielle McClellan, 540-433-3977, danielle@learnexportcompliance.com.

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ENEDITOR’S NOTES

* Joyce Brothers (Joyce Diane Brothers, née Bauer; 20 Oct 1927 – 13 May 2013; was an American psychologist, television personality and columnist, who wrote a daily newspaper advice column from 1960 to 2013. In 1955, she became the only woman ever to win the top prize on the American game show The $64,000 Question, answering questions on the topic of boxing, which was suggested as a stunt by the show’s producers.
  – “Listening, not imitation, may be the sincerest form of flattery.”
 
* Red Auerbach (Arnold Jacob “Red” Auerbach; 20 Sep 1917 – 28 Oct 2006; was an American basketball coach of the Washington Capitols, the Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the Boston Celtics. After he retired from coaching, he served as president and front office executive of the Celtics until his death in 2006.)
  – “To a father, when a child dies, the future dies; to a child when a parent dies, the past dies.”
 
* Upton Sinclair (Upton Sinclair Jr.; 20 Sep 1878 – 25 Nov 1968; was an American writer who wrote nearly one hundred books and other works in several genres.  Sinclair acquired particular fame for his classic muck-raking novel The Jungle, which exposed labor and sanitary conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry.  He won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943.)
  – “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

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EN_a318
. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date?
(Source: Editor)

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  Changes to applicable regulations are listed below.
 
*
ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS
: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War
  – Last Amendment: 15 Jan 2016: 81 FR 2657-2723: Machineguns, Destructive Devices and Certain Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible Persons of a Trust or Legal Entity With Respect To Making or Transferring a Firearm. 
 
*
CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199
  – Last Amendment: 28 Jul 2017: 82 FR 35064-35065: Technical Corrections to U.S. Customs and Border Protection Regulations
 
DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM): DoD 5220.22-M

  – Last Amendment: 18 May 2016: Change 2
: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and cancelled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM (Summary 
here
.)


EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR)
: 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774

  
– Last Amendment: 15 Aug 2017: 
82 FR 38764-38819: Wassenaar Arrangement 2016 Plenary Agreements Implementation

  
*
FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR)
: 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders
  – Last Amendment: 16 Jun 2017: 82 FR 27613-27614: Removal of Burmese Sanctions Regulations 
 
*
FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR)
: 15 CFR Part 30
  – Last Amendment: 20 Sep 2017: 82 FR 43842-43844: Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Clarification on Filing Requirements; Correction  
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here.
  – The latest edition (18 July 2017) of Bartlett’s Annotated FTR (“BAFTR”), by James E. Bartlett III, is available for downloading in Word format. The BAFTR contains all FTR amendments, FTR Letters and Notices, a large Index, and footnotes containing case annotations, practice tips, Census/AES guidance, and to many errors contained in the official text. Subscribers receive revised copies every time the FTR is amended. The BAFTR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance website.  BITAR subscribers are entitled to a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BAFTR.
 
*
HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA)
, 1 Jan 2017: 19 USC 1202 Annex. (“HTS” and “HTSA” are often seen as abbreviations for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated, shortened versions of “HTSUSA”.)
  – Last Amendment: 25 Jul 2017: Harmonized System Update 1706, containing 834 ABI records and 157 harmonized tariff records.
  – HTS codes for AES are available
here
.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here.
 
INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130.
  – Last Amendment: 30 Aug 2017: 82 FR 41172-41173: Temporary Modification of Category XI of the United States Munitions List
  – The only available fully updated copy (latest edition: 12 Sep 2017) of the ITAR with all amendments is contained in Bartlett’s Annotated 

ITAR
(“BITAR”)
, by James E. Bartlett III. The BITAR contains all ITAR amendments to date, plus a large Index, over 800 footnotes containing amendment histories, case annotations, practice tips, DDTC guidance, and explanations of errors in the official ITAR text. Subscribers receive updated copies of the BITAR in Word by email, usually revised within 24 hours after every ITAR amendment.
 The BITAR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance
 
website
. BAFTR subscribers receive a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BITAR, please
contact us
to receive your discount code.
 

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EN_a0319. 
Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories

(Source: Editor) 

Review last week’s top Ex/Im stories in “Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories” published 
here

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EPEDITORIAL POLICY

* The Ex/Im Daily Update is a publication of FCC Advisory B.V., compiled by: Editor, James E. Bartlett III; Assistant Editors, Alexander P. Bosch and Vincent J.A. Goossen; and Events & Jobs Editor, John Bartlett. The Ex/Im Daily Update is emailed every business day to approximately 8,000 readers of changes to defense and high-tech trade laws and regulations. We check the following sources daily: Federal Register, Congressional Record, Commerce/AES, Commerce/BIS, DHS/CBP, DOJ/ATF, DoD/DSS, DoD/DTSA, State/DDTC, Treasury/OFAC, White House, and similar websites of Australia, Canada, U.K., and other countries and international organizations.  Due to space limitations, we do not post Arms Sales notifications, Denied Party listings, or Customs AD/CVD items.

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