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17-0622 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

17-0622 Thursday “Daily Bugle”

Thursday, 22 June 2017

TOPThe Daily Bugle is a free daily newsletter from Full Circle Compliance, containing changes to export/import regulations (ATF, Customs, NISPOM, EAR, FACR/OFAC, FTR/AES, HTSUS, and ITAR), plus news and events. Subscribe 
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  1. Commerce/BIS Amends EAR, Adds 10 Entities to the Entity List
  2. President Posts Determination Concerning Iran’s Sale of Crude Oil
  3. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 400, Automated Clearinghouse
  4. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 300, Bonded Warehouse Proprietor’s Submission
  5. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Bonded Warehouse Regulations
  6. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Declaration of Person Who Performed Repairs
  7. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Forms 7501 & 7501A, Entry Summary
  8. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 7507, General Declaration
  1. Ex/Im Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions
  2. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings.)
  3. DHS/CBP Posts Amended Entry Types by PGA
  4. DoD/DSS Announces 2017 Cogswell Awards
  5. State/DDTC: (No new postings.)
  1. ST&R Trade Report: “Vietnam Plans Import Licensing Requirement for Cyber Information Security Products”
  2. WorldECR News Alert, 22 Jun
  1. M. Volkov: “CCOs and Resources: Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is!”
  1. Bartlett’s Unfamiliar Quotations 
  2. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date? Latest Changes: ATF (15 Jan 2016), Customs (27 Jan 2017), DOD/NISPOM (18 May 2016), EAR (22 Jun 2017), FACR/OFAC (16 Jun 2017), FTR (19 Apr 2017), HTSUS (26 Apr 2017), ITAR (11 Jan 2017) 
  3. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories 

EXIMEX/IM ITEMS FROM TODAY’S FEDERAL REGISTER

EXIM_a1

 
82 FR 28405-28410: Russian Sanctions: Addition of Certain Entities to the Entity List
* AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce.
* ACTION: Final rule.
* SUMMARY: The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amends the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) by adding ten entities to the Entity List. The ten entities that are added to the Entity List have been determined by the U.S. Government to be acting contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States. BIS is taking this action to ensure the efficacy of existing sanctions on the Russian Federation (Russia) for violating international law and fueling the conflict in eastern Ukraine. These entities will be listed on the Entity List under the destinations of the Crimea region of Ukraine and Russia.
* DATES: This rule is effective June 22, 2017.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chair, End-User Review Committee, Office of the Assistant Secretary, Export Administration, Bureau of Industry and Security, Department of Commerce, Phone: (202) 482-5991, Email: ERC@bis.doc.gov.
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  Three entities are added based on activities that are described in Executive Order 13660 (79 FR 13493), Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Ukraine, issued by President Barack Obama on March 6, 2014. As described in the Executive Order, President Obama found that the actions and policies of persons who have asserted governmental authority in Crimea without the authorization of the Government of Ukraine undermine democratic processes and institutions in Ukraine; threaten its peace, security, stability, sovereignty, and territorial integrity; and contribute to the misappropriation of its assets, and thereby constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. President Obama also declared a national emergency to deal with that threat. …
  Three entities are added based on activities that are described in Executive Order 13661 (79 FR 15533), Blocking Property of Additional Persons Contributing to the Situation in Ukraine, issued by President Barack Obama on March 16, 2014. This Order expanded the scope of the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13660 of March 6, 2014 (79 FR 13493). As described in Executive Order 13661, President Obama found that the actions and policies of the Government of the Russian Federation with respect to Ukraine–including the deployment of Russian military forces in the Crimea region of Ukraine–undermine democratic processes and institutions in Ukraine; threaten its peace, security, stability, sovereignty, and territorial integrity; and contribute to the misappropriation of its assets, and thereby constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. …
  Four entities are added based on activities that are described in Executive Order 13685 (79 FR 77357), Blocking Property of Certain Persons and Prohibiting Certain Transactions with Respect to the Crimea Region of Ukraine, issued on December 19, 2014. In order to take additional steps to address the Russian occupation of the Crimea region of Ukraine with respect to the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13660 of March 6, 2014, and expanded in Executive Order 13661 of March 16, 2014, and Executive Order 13662 of March 20, 2014, President Obama ordered certain additional prohibitions with respect to the Crimea region of Ukraine. In particular, Executive Order 13685 prohibits the export, reexport, sale or supply, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by a U.S. person, wherever located, of any goods, services, or technology to the Crimea region of Ukraine. Under Section 10 of the Order, all agencies of the United States Government are directed to take all appropriate measures within their authority to carry out the provisions of the Order. …
 
  This final rule adds the following ten entities to the Entity List: …
 
  Dated: June 20, 2017.
Matthew S. Borman, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Export Administration.

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EXIM_a2

 
82 FR 28391: Presidential Determination Pursuant to Section 1245(d)(4)(B) and (C) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012
 
Memorandum for the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of Energy
 
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, after carefully considering the reports submitted to the Congress by the Energy Information Administration, including the report submitted April 11, 2017, and other relevant factors such as global economic conditions, increased oil production by certain countries, the level of spare petroleum production capacity, and the availability of strategic reserves, I determine, pursuant to section 1245(d)(4)(B) and (C) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, Public Law 112-81, and consistent with prior determinations, that there is a sufficient supply of petroleum and petroleum products from countries other than Iran to permit a significant reduction in the volume of petroleum and petroleum products purchased from Iran by or through foreign financial institutions. As my Administration conducts a review of its Iran policy, and consistent with United States commitments specified in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, however, the United States is not pursuing efforts to reduce Iran’s sales of crude oil at this time. …
 
(Presidential Sig.)
THE WHITE HOUSE,
Washington, May 17, 2017

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EXIM_a33
. DHS/CBP Seeks Comments on Form 400, Automated Clearinghouse

 
82 FR 28505-28506: Agency Information Collection Activities: Automated Clearinghouse
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments; extension of an existing collection of information. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional PRA information should be directed to CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Automated Clearinghouse.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0078.
  – Form Number: CBP Form 400.
  – Abstract: The Automated Clearinghouse (ACH) allows participants in the Automated Broker Interface (ABI) to transmit daily statements, deferred tax, and bill payments electronically through a financial institution directly to a CBP account. ACH debit allows the payer to exercise more control over the payment process. In order to participate in ACH debit, companies must complete CBP Form 400, ACH Application. Participants also use this form to notify CBP of changes to bank information or contact information. The ACH procedure is authorized by 19 U.S.C. 58a-58c and 19 U.S.C. 66, and provided for by 19 CFR 24.25. CBP Form 400 is accessible here. …
 
  Dated: June 16, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

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EXIM_a4

 
82 FR 28508-28509: Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor’s Submission
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing collection of information. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information should be directed to the CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor’s Submission.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0033.
  – Form Number: CBP Form 300.
  – Abstract: CBP Form 300, The Bonded Warehouse Proprietor’s Submission, is filed annually by each warehouse proprietor. The information on CBP Form 300 is used by CBP to evaluate warehouse activity for the year. This form must be filed within 45 days of the end of his business year, pursuant to the provisions of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 66, 1311, 1555, 1556, 1557, 1623 and 19 CFR 19.12(g). The information collected on this form helps CBP determine all bonded merchandise that was entered, released, and manipulated in the warehouse. CBP Form 300 is accessible here. …
 
  Dated: June 19, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

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EXIM_a5

 
82 FR 28510-28511: Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments; extension of an existing collection of information. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional PRA information should be directed to CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0041.
  – Abstract: Owners or lessees desiring to establish a bonded warehouse must make written application to the CBP port director of the port where the warehouse is located. The application must include the warehouse location, a description of the premises, and an indication of the class of bonded warehouse permit desired. Owners or lessees desiring to alter or to relocate a bonded warehouse may submit an application to the CBP port director of the port where the facility is located. The authority to establish and maintain a bonded warehouse is set forth in 19 U.S.C. 1555, and provided for by 19 CFR 19.2, 19 CFR 19.3, 19 CFR 19.6, 19 CFR 19.14, and 19 CFR 19.36. …
 
  Dated: June 16, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

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EXIM_a6

 
82 FR 28501-28504: Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration of Person Who Performed Repairs
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments; extension of an existing collection of information.
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional PRA information should be directed to CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Declaration of Person Who Performed Repairs.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0048.
  – Abstract: The “Declaration of Persons Who Performed Repairs or Alterations,” as required by 19 CFR 10.8, is used in connection with the entry of articles entered under subheadings 9802.00.40 and 9802.00.50, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). Articles entered under these HTSUS provisions are articles that were in the U.S. and were exported temporarily for repairs. Upon their return, duty is only assessed on the value of the repairs performed abroad and not on the full value of the article. The declaration under 19 CFR 10.8 includes information such as a description of the article and the repairs; the value of the article and the repairs; and a declaration by the owner, importer, consignee, or agent having knowledge of the pertinent facts. The information in this declaration is used by CBP to determine the value of the repairs and assess duty only on the value of those repairs. …
 
  Dated: June 16, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

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EXIM_a7

 
82 FR 28506-28507: Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry Summary
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments; extension of an existing collection of information. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional PRA information should be directed to CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: Entry Summary.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0022.
  – Form Number: 7501, 7501A.
  – Abstract: CBP Form 7501, Entry Summary, is used to identify merchandise entering the commerce of the United States, and to document the amount of duty and/or tax paid. CBP Form 7501 is submitted by the importer, or the importer’s agent, for each import transaction. The data on this form is used by CBP as a record of the import transaction; to collect the proper duty, taxes, certifications and enforcement information; and to provide data to the U.S. Census Bureau for statistical purposes. CBP Form 7501 must be filed within 10 working days from the time of entry of merchandise into the United States.
  CBP Form 7501A, Document/Payment Transmittal, is used to reconcile a supplemental payment after an initial Automated Clearinghouse payment with the associated entry so the respondent’s account is properly credited. …
 
  Dated: June 16, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

EXIM_a8

 
82 FR 28509-28510: Agency Information Collection Activities: General Declaration
* AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security.
* ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing collection of information. …
* FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information should be directed to the CBP Paperwork Reduction Act Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, Regulations and Rulings, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229-1177, or via email CBP_PRA@cbp.dhs.gov. …
* SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: …
  – Title: General Declaration (Outward/Inward) Agriculture, Customs, Immigration, and Public Health.
  – OMB Number: 1651-0002.
  – Form Number: Form 7507.
  – Abstract: An aircraft commander or agent must file CBP Form 7507, General Declaration (Outward/Inward) Agriculture, Customs, Immigration, and Public Health at the time of arrival for all aircraft required to enter pursuant to 19 CFR 122.41 and at the time of clearance for all aircraft departing to a foreign area with commercial airport cargo pursuant to 19 CFR 122.72. This form is used to document clearance and inspections by appropriate regulatory agency staffs. CBP Form 7507 collects information about the flight routing, the number of passengers embarking and disembarking, the number of crew members, a declaration of health for the persons on board, and details about disinfecting and sanitizing treatments during the flight. This form also includes a declaration attesting to the accuracy, completeness, and truthfulness of all statements contained in the form and in any document attached to the form.
  CBP Form 7507 is authorized by 19 U.S.C. 1431, 1433, and 1644a; and provided for by 19 CFR 122.43, 122.54, 122.73, and 122.144. This form is accessible here.
 
     Dated: June 19, 2017.
Seth Renkema, Branch Chief, Economic Impact Analysis Branch, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

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OGS
OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES

OGS_a19. Ex/Im Items Scheduled for Publication in Future Federal Register Editions

(Source: Federal Register)

* President; ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS [Publication Date: 23 June 2017.]:
  – North Korea; Continuation of National Emergency (Notice of June 21, 2017)

  – Western Balkans; Continuation of National Emergency (Notice of June 21, 2017)

* State; NOTICES; Designations as Foreign Terrorist Organizations [Publication Date: 23 June 2017.]:

  – al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula (and Other Aliases)

  – Hizballah (and other aliases)

* State; NOTICES; Designations as Global Terrorists [Publication Date: 23 June 2017.]:
  – al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula and Other Aliases
  – Hizballah (and Other Aliases)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGS_a210. Commerce/BIS: (No new postings.)

(Source:
Commerce/BIS
)

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OGS_a411
. DHS/CBP Posts Amended Entry Types by PGA

(Source: CSMS #17-000370, 22 Jun 2017)
 
CBP is providing this message as there was an update to the “Entry Types by PGA” guide to address EPA Vehicles and Engines (V&E) merchandise being withdrawn from a foreign trade zone.

V&E withdrawals now fall under the “Dual Option,” allowing PGA data to be transmitted at entry summary if the filer submits a weekly estimate. Please refer to the attached chart. This chart will also be posted to cbp.gov at a future date.

For additional information on PGA-related filing issues, please contact William.R.Scopa@CBP.DHS.GOV OR Erik.Lowe@CBP.DHS.GOV

  – Related CSMS No. 16-000580

  – Attachment(s): PGA_Entry_Type_Codes.pdf

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OGS_a512
. DoD/DSS Announces 2017 Cogswell Awards

(Source: DoD/DSS)
 
The Defense Security Service (DSS) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 James S. Cogswell Outstanding Industrial Security Achievement Award. Thirty-six facilities were selected for the award, presented today at the annual NCMS training seminar, in Anaheim, Calif. The entire list of winners can be seen here.

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NWSNEWS

NWS_a114. ST&R Trade Report: “Vietnam Plans Import Licensing Requirement for Cyber Information Security Products”

 
As part of the implementation of its November 2015 Law on Network Information Security, Vietnam is planning to impose an import licensing scheme for certain cyber information security products with specified core functions. However, at the request of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative Vietnam has agreed to delay this requirement pending additional clarification on the products and companies that will be affected. In the meantime USTR is soliciting comments and concerns on the potential impact of this requirement on U.S. exporters.
 
Items covered by the import licensing requirement are classified under various HTS 8471 subheadings. While it remains unclear which items will be considered to have the required core function for cyber security information, a release from Vietnam’s Ministry of Information and Communication details three categories.
 
  – products that scan, check, and/or analyze the architecture, status, and record data of an information system, detect its flaws and weaknesses, and examine risks to information safety
  – products that supervise and analyze data in an information system, collect and analyze record data in real time, and detect and alert on unusual events or those with potential danger to information safety
  – products that stop attacks and intrusions into information systems (a category that could be broadly interpreted to include many products that have standard mechanisms to deter cyber attacks)
 
Currently available information indicates that spare parts and components will not be subject to import licensing.
 
Covered products will also likely require a Vietnam business license to be imported or exported. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

NWS_a215. WorldECR News Alert, 22 Jun

 
  (1) Trump Announces Reversal of Obama’s Rapprochement with Cuba
  (2) EU Agrees United Response to Cyber Attacks
  (3) US Department of State ‘Mystified’ by Qatar Embargo
  (4) Australia Issues Further Sanctions against North Korea
  (5) EU Extends Sanctions on Crimea and Sevastopol

[Editor’s Note: To subscribe to WorldECR, the journal of export controls and sanctions, please visit http://worldecr.com/.]
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COMMCOMMENTARY

(Source:
Volkov Law Group Blog. Reprinted by permission.)
 
* Author: Michael Volkov, Esq., Volkov Law Group, mvolkov@volkovlaw.com, 240-505-1992.
 
The compliance profession is enjoying its moment of triumph. Chief compliance officers are earning substantial salaries and rewarded with high-level positions in the C-Suite and significant influence. CCOs are the hot commodities in the in the corporate governance world. It is an intoxicating time for compliance professionals.
 
In this environment, CCOs have to be wary. CEOs and other corporate leaders know how to talk the talk of compliance. But CEOs and other corporate leaders ignore how to walk the walk. In other words, they know how to persuade CCOs that they are committed to compliance and will support the compliance function. When it comes to delivering support in terms of resources and support, corporate boards, CEOs and senior leaders are falling short.
 
CCOs are being slowly strangled by a lack of resources. I am not just referring to headcount, but funding to purchase new technologies to leverage existing staff. CCOs are forced to request additional resources by pleading for support from the board, a CEO or a general counsel. These requests are often ignored or downplayed unless a company is under government investigation and threat of punishment.
 
In the absence of government investigation, CCOs face an uphill climb. As a result, CCOs are forced to make due with inadequate resources, and outmoded technologies. Many companies fail to understand the bottom-line benefits of a robust ethics and compliance program.
 
Companies that maintain an effective ethics and compliance program perform better than companies that fail to maintain such a compliance program. A company that fails to support its compliance program is cutting its own throat – employee morale will suffer, and productivity will decline.   CCOs have to educate CEOs and the corporate board about the importance of supporting the compliance function with adequate resources – personnel and technology.
 
A model for CCO treatment is the internal audit function. In the face of Sarbanes-Oxley, audit committee chairs are more than willing to allocate resources when needed to ensure the accuracy of financial reports. Several internal auditors have told me that they are able to get the resources they need when they need them. No questions asked.
 
CCOs are entitled to the same treatment. For some reason, audit committees and senior executives treat CCO requests for additional resources in a different manner. CCOs have to push to change this situation by educating audit committee chairs and CEOs to support the compliance function.
 
CCOs have to challenge their leaders by stating a consistent message – compliance requires adequate resources and here is the list of resources needed to ensure an effective ethics and compliance program. Along with this clear message, the CCO has to educate the board, CEO and senior leaders on specific requirements for an effective ethics and compliance program.
 
In carrying out this mission, CCOs have to ignore “happy talk” of empty promises made by CEOs and senior executives. If a CCO wants to accomplish his/her objectives, a CCO has to be clear about program requirements.
 
I hear continuing complaints from compliance professionals about lack of resources, and frustration over CEOs and senior leaders who ignore or reject requests for more resources. CCOs have to continue pushing this issue, educating boards, CEOs and senior executives on the importance of achieving an “effective” ethics and compliance program.

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ENEDITOR’S NOTES

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

EN_a218
. Are Your Copies of Regulations Up to Date?
(Source: Editor)

The official versions of the following regulations are published annually in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), but are updated as amended in the Federal Register.  Changes to applicable regulations are listed below.
 
*
ATF ARMS IMPORT REGULATIONS
: 27 CFR Part 447-Importation of Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War
  – Last Amendment: 15 Jan 2016: 81 FR 2657-2723: Machineguns, Destructive Devices and Certain Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible Persons of a Trust or Legal Entity With Respect To Making or Transferring a Firearm 
 
*
CUSTOMS REGULATIONS
: 19 CFR, Ch. 1, Pts. 0-199
  – Last Amendment: 27 Jan 2017: 82 FR 8589-8590: Delay of Effective Date for Importations of Certain Vehicles and Engines Subject to Federal Antipollution Emission Standards [New effective date: 21 March 2017.]; and 82 FR 8590: Delay of Effective Date for Toxic Substance Control Act Chemical Substance Import Certification Process Revisions [New effective date: 21 March 2017.]

* DOD NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM OPERATING MANUAL (NISPOM): DoD 5220.22-M
  – Last Amendment: 18 May 2016: Change 2: Implement an insider threat program; reporting requirements for Cleared Defense Contractors; alignment with Federal standards for classified information systems; incorporated and canceled Supp. 1 to the NISPOM  (Summary here.)

* EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS (EAR): 15 CFR Subtit. B, Ch. VII, Pts. 730-774 
  – Last Amendment:
22 Jun 2017: 82 FR 28405-28410: Russian Sanctions: Addition of Certain Entities to the Entity List

  
*
FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (OFAC FACR)
: 31 CFR, Parts 500-599, Embargoes, Sanctions, Executive Orders
  –  Last Amendment: 16 Jun 2017: 82 FR 27613-27614: Removal of Burmese Sanctions Regulations
 
*
FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS (FTR)
: 15 CFR Part 30
  – Last Amendment: 19 Apr 2017: 82 FR 18383-18393: Foreign Trade Regulations: Clarification on Filing Requirements 
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here.
  – The latest edition (19 Apr 2017) of Bartlett’s Annotated FTR (“BAFTR”), by James E. Bartlett III, is available for downloading in Word format. The BAFTR contains all FTR amendments, FTR Letters and Notices, a large Index, and footnotes containing case annotations, practice tips, and Census/AES guidance.  Subscribers receive revised copies every time the FTR is amended. The BAFTR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance website.  BITAR subscribers are entitled to a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BAFTR.
 
*
HARMONIZED TARIFF SCHEDULE OF THE UNITED STATES (HTS, HTSA or HTSUSA)
, 1 Jan 2017: 19 USC 1202 Annex. (“HTS” and “HTSA” are often seen as abbreviations for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated, shortened versions of “HTSUSA”.)

  – Last Amendment: 26 Apr 2017: Harmonized System Update 1703, containing 2,512 ABI records and 395 harmonized tariff records.

  – HTS codes for AES are available
here
.
  – HTS codes that are not valid for AES are available
here.
 
INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS (ITAR): 22 C.F.R. Ch. I, Subch. M, Pts. 120-130.
  – Latest Amendment: 11 Jan 2017: 82 FR 3168-3170: 2017 Civil Monetary Penalties Inflationary Adjustment
  – The only available fully updated copy (latest edition 10 Jun 2017) of the ITAR with all amendments is contained in Bartlett’s Annotated ITAR (“BITAR”), by James E. Bartlett III.  The BITAR contains all ITAR amendments to date, plus a large Index, over 800 footnotes containing amendment histories, case annotations, practice tips, DDTC guidance, and explanations of errors in the official ITAR text.  Subscribers receive updated copies of the BITAR in Word by email, usually revised within 24 hours after every ITAR amendment.  The BITAR is available by annual subscription from the Full Circle Compliance
website
.  BAFTR subscribers receive a 25% discount on subscriptions to the BITAR, please
contact us

to receive your discount code. 

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EN_a319
. Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories
(Source: Editors)

Review last week’s top Ex/Im stories in “Weekly Highlights of the Daily Bugle Top Stories” published 
here
. 

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EPEDITORIAL POLICY

* The Ex/Im Daily Update is a publication of FCC Advisory B.V., edited by James E. Bartlett III and Alexander Bosch, and emailed every business day to approximately 8,000 subscribers to inform readers of changes to defense and high-tech trade laws and regulations. We check the following sources daily: Federal Register, Congressional Record, Commerce/AES, Commerce/BIS, DHS/CBP, DOJ/ATF, DoD/DSS, DoD/DTSA, State/DDTC, Treasury/OFAC, White House, and similar websites of Australia, Canada, U.K., and other countries and international organizations.  Due to space limitations, we do not post Arms Sales notifications, Denied Party listings, or Customs AD/CVD items.

* RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS: This email contains no proprietary, classified, or export-controlled information. All items are obtained from public sources or are published with permission of private contributors, and may be freely circulated without further permission. Any further use of contributors’ material, however, must comply with applicable copyright laws.

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